Awards

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Judges have today released the shortlist for this year’s British Archaeological Awards showcasing the very latest discoveries and innovations in archaeology across the UK, with Reading University’s long-term Silchester excavation shortlisted for Best Archaeological Project 2016.

The results will be announced at the British Archaeological Awards ceremony at the British Museum in London on 11 July, compèred by ‘Meet the Ancestors’ archaeologist and TV presenter Julian Richards.

John Lewis, Chair of the British Archaeological Awards judging panel for the Best Archaeological Project Award commented on the Silchester project,

The aim of this long-running project is the publication of the total excavation of a large sample (25%) of one insula (block) to characterise the changing nature of the occupation of the Roman town at Silchester. The Judges were impressed with the way the project maximised environmental techniques and the development and use of a sophisticated database to aid analysis and make the findings accessible for future generations. The project has had a long-standing programme of public engagement, with many thousands of visitors each year.

Deborah Williams, Chair of the British Archaeological Awards added,

“The entries this year reflect the incredible wealth and range of archaeology that is going on across the United Kingdom, the quality and expertise of our world-leading archaeologists, and the ever increasing fascination of the public with the history and archaeology of their local area.

“Increasingly archaeologists are responding to this interest by developing new ways to help people to take part in research and excavations, start up their own projects, and share and understand new discoveries – and this shines through in our shortlisted entries. All the finalists have a common theme – involving and enthusing young people and the public in their archaeological heritage.

The British Archaeological Awards entries are judged by independent panels made up of leading experts from across the archaeology field in the UK, including both professional and voluntary sectors and aim to celebrate and share the best of British archaeology with the public.

 

See the shortlisted projects at www.archaeologicalawards.com and follow the Awards on twitter @BAAWARDSUK

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The School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science has been successful in receiving the Silver Athena SWAN award, given by the Equality Challenge Unit.

Athena SWAN was established in 2005 to encourage and recognise commitment to tackling gender inequality in higher education. It has traditionally covered science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine (STEMM) disciplines, but has been expanded to include arts, humanities, social sciences, business and law departments (AHSSBL) as well.

The winning submission from the Gender & Fieldwork photo competition, by George Hibberd

The winning submission from the Gender & Fieldwork photo competition, by George Hibberd

SAGES received the Bronze Athena SWAN Award in 2011 and has continued to be committed to creating an inclusive environment for all. Our School-specific objectives for Athena SWAN are:

1. To aspire to a culture of equality for our staff (academic, admin, research and technical) and students;

2. To enhance induction, communication and consultation processes within and between Archaeology, GES and SAGES;

3. To improve collegiality and achieve a more cohesive structure in SAGES;

4. To foster a supportive culture of mentoring, review (PDRs), training and promotion across SAGES (regardless of career stage).

Dr Nick Branch, current Head of School, says “The last three years has been a period of rapid and positive change for the School. Since our Bronze Award, we have extensively refurbished the School infrastructure, changed the School name and mission, and prioritised equality, diversity and wellbeing. Athena SWAN has been the key platform for transforming the culture and improving working lives within the School.”

Ellie Highwood, Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, said the silver award to SAGES reflected the impact of innovative actions, such as a year-long School-wide “Gender in Fieldwork” project, on everyone in the School.

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RobertaGilchrist_3283-e (1)Professor Roberta Gilchrist has been nominated for ‘Archaeologist of the Year’ in the 8th Annual Current Archaeology Awards.

Roberta’s nomination recognises her work as a pioneer of social approaches to medieval archaeology, a champion of equal opportunities, and her work with Norwich Cathedral and Glastonbury Abbey. The full nomination reads:

“Roberta Gilchrist is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Reading.  She has pioneered social approaches to medieval archaeology, opening up new questions on gender and age and publishing important studies on medieval nunneries, hospitals, castles, and burials. Roberta has been a champion for equal opportunities, promoting women in archaeology and leading initiatives to integrate disability into the teaching of archaeological fieldwork. She was archaeologist to Norwich Cathedral and published a major study of Norwich Cathedral Close. Her monograph on the excavations at Glastonbury Abbey (1904–79) has just been published, making the results of 36 seasons of antiquarian excavations available for the first time. She is currently working with the Abbey on digital reconstructions and educational resources to make this work accessible to visitors.”

 

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Dr Hella Eckardt’s book ‘Objects and Identities: Roman Britain and the North-Western Provinces’ has been nominated for ‘Book of the Year’!

“Every object, however humble, has a tale to tell, and in this fascinating book carefully-chosen case studies tease out the ways that artefacts reflect their owners’ values and aspirations. From utilitarian kit to imported luxury goods, the items examined paint a vivid picture of regional variation, and approaches to consumption and display.”

 

You can cast your vote for both nominees here.

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Dr Duncan Garrow has been successful in gaining a grant of £9842 from the Honor Frost Foundation to undertake underwater survey, geophysics and remote sensing work in several lochs in Lewis, Outer Hebrides, with his long-time collaborator and Principal Investigator on the project Fraser Sturt (Southampton).

Divers and local archaeologists from Lewis have found a number of complete Neolithic pots on the bottom of several lochs, suggesting they may have come from submerged settlements (dating to c. 4000-2500 BC) preserved under the water. Duncan and Fraser, in collaboration with various expert colleagues, are hoping to find out what these settlements looked like, how well preserved they are, and why they became submerged. Find out more about the sites here.

Congratulations, Duncan!

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Mike accepts the 2015 Current Archaeology Award for Archaeologist of the Year (sponsored by Andante Travels). It was presented by Julian Richards of Meet the Ancestors (L) Credit to: Current Archaeology/Mark Edwards

Mike accepts the 2015 Current Archaeology Award for Archaeologist of the Year. It was presented by Julian Richards of Meet the Ancestors (L)
Credit to: Current Archaeology/Mark Edwards

Professor Mike Fulford was honoured at Current Archaeology Live! 2015 last week, winning ‘Archaeologist of the Year’ by popular vote.

The awards pay tribute to archaeology’s star projects and publications that made the pages of CA this year, and the people judged to have made outstanding contributions to archaeology.  They are voted for entirely by the public, and there are no panels of judges.

Accepting the award, Mike says “I’m really delighted to receive the ‘Archaeologist of the Year Award’ for 2015.  It’s a great honour and  a particular pleasure to have received the award from a former University of Reading student, Julian Richards.”

Mike poses with Amanda Clarke, site director of the Silchester Town Life project, and Julian Richards.  Credit to: Current Archaeology/Mark Edwards

Mike poses with Amanda Clarke, site director of the Silchester Town Life project, and Julian Richards.
Credit to: Current Archaeology/Mark Edwards

Mike has directed excavations at Silchester, a major Roman and Iron Age site in Hampshire, for almost 20 years. The Reading Archaeology Field School was based at the excavations until the project ended last year. However, the work continues with the new Silchester Environs Iron Age project, and there will continue to be opportunities for our students to take part in further archaeological work both inside and outside the Roman town over the next 3 years.

About Mike

Michael Fulford is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Reading. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1994 (currently serving as its Treasurer), and was appointed CBE in the 2011 New Years Honours for Services to Scholarship. He was appointed a Commissioner of English Heritage last May and in that role chairs the English Heritage Advisory Committee. For the past 18 years he has directed the recently-concluded Silchester Town Life Project, and is also director of a five-year Leverhulme Trust-funded project on the Rural Settlement of Roman Britain. Check out his staff profile for more.

 

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