never closer to midnight: live performance 26 September

Credit: Janine Harrington

never closer to midnight

Thursday 26 September

1pm and 3pm, Palmer Quad, Whiteknights Campus;

6pm, Reading Town Centre

 

A meditative, rhythmic outdoor live art installation, exploring our felt sense of urgency in the face of climate change. The project draws inspiration from the Doomsday Clock imagined by scientists in 1947 to convey threats to humanity and the earth.

 

This new work from artist Janine Harrington is a co-commission between the University of Reading and Reading Thames Festival. During her research process, Janine is in conversation with a number of researchers from the University of Reading, whose research interests overlap with the themes of the piece. The work will be performed by an 11-strong cast including members of the University and wider Reading communities.

 

Janine Harrington is an artist whose practice involves choreography, installation, writing and performance. She is interested in game structures, play, access, neurodiversity and the poetics of movement practices. Increasingly her work addresses sociality or ways of being together through exploring scales and movements beyond the human scale. 

 

Please note: in the event of heavy rain, performances may be stopped or moved indoors to the Bob Kayley Theatre, Minghella Building. Please wear weather appropriate clothing as audience members will be outdoors and standing throughout.

Arts Ambassadors sought: never closer to midnight

Arts Ambassador role – paid

required for up to 10 hours between 24-26 September, £8.38 per hour

 

I am looking for up to four Arts Ambassadors to help spread the word about a free, live art event happening on campus on the 26 September, as part of the Reading Thames Festival.

 

‘never closer to midnight’ is a meditative, rhythmic outdoor live art installation, exploring our felt sense of urgency in the face of climate change.

 

The project draws inspiration from the Doomsday Clock imagined by scientists in 1947 to convey threats to humanity and the earth. Through repetition of human action and the familiar image of the clock, the work seeks to evoke conflicting senses of scale in the face of an individual’s response to the climate emergency.

 

The work will be performed twice during the afternoon of September 26th in Palmer Quad. It will be free to attend and will be drop in – so it doesn’t matter how long you stay for to watch or at what point you arrive.

 

Ambassadors will be roaming Whiteknights campus on the day and the previous day, telling people about the event and encouraging them to come and watch.

During the event, some ambassadors will also be needed to steward the performances, ensuring that people remain safe and being an information point.

 

Skills required:

Comfortable talking to people

Outgoing and friendly

Responsible and punctual

Able to work alone

 

Desirable:

Interest in arts and/or events

Interest in theme of climate change and environmental sustainability

Please apply by 18 September via Campus Jobs