The many perks of festival volunteering

It can’t be denied that volunteering experience is an essential and worthy addition to anyone’s CV, especially for graduates.

A recent Timebank survey stated that 73% of employers would recruit a candidate how has volunteered, over one without, while a staggering 94% also believe that volunteering can improve your current skill set.

Of all the volunteering opportunities out there, nothing can compare to being a festival volunteer, With most of the 700+ UK festivals filling their staff positions with volunteers, they need your help now more than ever.

Not only do you get to enjoy the festival outside of your working hours, but with such a variety of festival assistance needed, you could be working in a role that could benefit your future career.

Roles can vary from the traditional stewarding, bar work and wristbanding, right down to site decoration, reception work and behind the scenes work as a runner.

When you’re not enjoying the festival, many volunteers also receive free meals during their shift, as well as separate camping and shower facilities. Working hours can vary from three hours a day to two sets of 12 hour shifts, with some roles requiring your help before or after the festival, meaning you can enjoy the full event in it’s entirety.

There is often no need to worry about missing your favourite bands either, as the friendly nature of the teams means that many will often swap shifts, or work something out accordingly.

Another benefit to festival volunteering is that no past experience is needed, as all staff receive full training, which can be seen as a free and introductory insight into how large and small scale events are run. When future employers see volunteer experience on your CV this shows adaptability and a candidate with a strong sense of team spirit.

To find out more about festival volunteering, including the chance to read testimonials from those who have volunteered in the past, check out the Wikifestivals Volunteer Page.

Wikifestivals is a not for profit organisation that aims to inform young people about how to find permanent or temporary work at festivals.

Teaching Jobs Abroad – Where Can I Teach?

TeacherPort is a free online resource for new university graduates and qualified  teachers to find suitable teaching jobs abroad.

Teaching overseas has becoming a popular career choice not only for qualified teachers interested in gaining international experience, but also for new university graduates with an itch to see the world while also gaining valuable work experience abroad. If you are interested in exploring various teaching jobs abroad, you’ll want to know what your options are and where you should be focusing your search.

The Middle East is known for offering the most lucrative expat packages and also has the highest demand for schoolteachers at present. Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Oman have international and national schools that are seeking qualified teachers on a yearly basis.

With growing economies throughout Asia, countries such as China, Japan, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam have very reputable international schools with a growing need for teachers. Japan and South Korea have long been popular teaching locations but China has seen a boom in international education in the past decade and Beijing and Shanghai are home to some of the best teaching opportunities in the region.

As a new university graduate with less than 1 year teaching experience, your best bet is to secure a position teaching English abroad in Asia. Many language schools in the Middle East require a minimum of 2 years teaching experience as well as a BA degree and ESL Diploma (TEFL, TESOL or CELTA), so, until you build up your experience and education background, Asia will be a more suitable job market to find your first teaching job abroad.

South Korea continues to have a high need for native English speaking teachers and as long as you hold a valid UK or Ireland passport, and possess a university degree, you already meet the minimum requirements for securing a position. Thailand and Vietnam also offer opportunities for new university graduates, but the teaching market is still maturing and the recruiting practices tend to be conducted mainly for teachers who are currently in these countries (although not exclusively).

 

If you are interested in learning more about your teaching abroad options, head over to TeacherPort’s free Teaching Abroad Guides. Once you have narrowed down the type of position you would like to pursue, you can find a number of recommended positions found on the Teaching Jobs Abroad section,

Good luck!

TeacherPort: http://teacherport.com

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Thinking of doing a PhD…?

10 good reasons to choose Reading for your PhD

1.  World-class research

2.  Professional and personal skills training to help you with your PhD and to equip you for the future

3.  A wide range of funding opportunities

4.  A proven track-record in supporting doctoral candidates through to completion

5.  Membership of the Graduate School

6.  Enhanced career prospects

7.  Significant investment in world-class PhD supervision

8.  Excellent research facilities

9.  More research programmes and modes of learning to suit your needs

10. An award-winning campus in a brilliant location

PE Recruitment – Job finding advice and help for PE Graduates

Article supplied by Fiona McKenzie, PE Recruitment

Are you a PE graduate looking for a teaching job for September? Yes? Then we’d like to help.

PE Recruitment are recruiting newly qualified PE Teachers right now for schools throughout the UK. Competition for jobs has rarely been this tough, and graduate unemployment rates so high, but last year we placed more NQTs than ever in PE Departments around the country.

PE Recruitment is a specialist PE and School Sport recruitment agency and we are contacted by schools throughout the UK, and the world, who are looking to recruit temporary and permanent teachers and sports coaches for their PE departments. All types of schools from both state and private sectors and from both Primary and Secondary levels, increasingly contact us first for their temporary and permanent PE needs.

If you are a student still without a job for September, or a 2011 graduate still looking to start the NQT Induction year, then we’d like to help. Lots of help and advice from the ex-PE Teachers on our team and lots of PE jobs available on our website.

What we can offer students & graduates:

  • A recruitment agency purely for PE Teachers and school sport professionals.
  • Job seekers can sign up for our free Job Alerts and visit our website to check out our current Vacancies:
  • Permanent jobs in state and independent schools throughout the UK.
  • Supply Contracts for PE Teachers with QTS or QTS pending.
  • With ex-PE Teachers on the team here, we aim to place the right PE Teacher in the right PE position. Lots of honest help and advice from people who have been PE Teachers themselves. Visit our NQT Advice Centre and our Top Tips for Job Hunting

Call 08456 44 88 29 or email info@perecruitment.co.uk for more information.

Safeguarding and good recruitment practice is an area that PE Recruitment takes great care in, making sure that all the DfE required checks have been carried out for all of our PE supply teachers. All our teachers are required to hold an Enhanced CRB. As members of the REC (Education) and holders of the DfE’s Quality Mark for teacher recruitment, candidates, teachers and schools can be assured of our recruitment good practice procedures.

PE Recruitment – Our Specialist Subject

www.perecruitment.co.uk

Getting a teaching job

Introduction

Before you read on… you are advised to consult the Prospects page on Getting a Teaching Job, which contains detailed information on local authority recruitment procedures, sample CVs and covering letters and guidance on application forms and interviews.

Local Authority first teaching appointment procedures

  1. LA “pool” – you apply centrally to the LA, and if successful are invited to a pool panel interview. If successful, the LA places you or head teachers will contact suitable candidates for an interview in their school. Closing dates from January onwards.
  2. LA database or brokerage system – you apply centrally to the LA, which then holds your details on file for head teachers to browse. Available from January onwards.
  3. Applications direct to the school – you apply to individual schools. This is the only method of application in some LA areas and can be combined with 1 and 2 above in most cases. March onwards.

Applications

Independent schools tend to favour a CV and letter of application. State schools and LAs usually require application forms and ask for a supporting statement.

In both cases you have the opportunity to describe your qualifications, experience and skills. It is important to “market” yourself. Give plenty of examples. Relate your application to the school, whenever possible. Always follow the instructions given. You can call in to the Careers Centre to have your application checked.

Supporting Statement/Letter of Application

As a guideline you could break down your information into five main areas:

  1. Teacher Training Course – including specialist subject, age range taught, special projects or interests.
  2. Teaching Practices – including type and size of schools, special responsibilities, subjects taught, resources you developed, example of a good lesson, special needs, ICT, EAL, school visits, parents’ contact, inset days etc.
  3. Your “philosophy” – how you manage your classroom, the teaching styles and strategies you use. What you believe is important to a child’s education.
  4. Relevant work experience in or outside education.
  5. Leisure activities – including other skills, abilities and interests.

What should go on my CV?

A CV should cover no more than two sides of A4, be clearly laid out and should cover the following:

  • Personal details
  • Education and qualifications (in reverse chronological order)
  • Teaching practices
  • Employment
  • Other experience
  • Skills
  • Leisure interests
  • Referees (usually your course leader and the head teacher of your last teaching practice school).

Vacancies

LAs now advertise on the web, examples below. The Times Educational Supplement (Fridays) carries many adverts for state, independent and overseas posts.

Interviews

You are strongly advised to visit a school prior to an interview, although this is more usual when applying for primary posts. Read through the advertisement and your application again. Think of the likely questions you will be asked and prepare your answers. Research the school, e.g Ofsted report, handbook. Arrive on time. Answer questions succinctly and relevantly. Above all be yourself! Any visits should be made during school hours so that you can meet the children and teachers and generally get a feel for the school and staffroom.

Interviews differ widely. You may be asked to teach a lesson, or demonstrate how you would teach a specific topic. The number on the panel might range from 1 – several. The length of the interview could be 20 – 45 minutes.

Portfolio

If applying to teach primary or a practical subject, you may be asked to bring evidence in support of your application. This could include carefully-selected photos of children at work, examples of children’s work, resources you have created, or an example of a particularly successful lesson.

Successful candidates are often offered the job on the same day as the interview, so prepare yourself for this occurrence.

Remember that an interview not only provides school staff with the opportunity to question you but also for you to ascertain whether you feel the school is right for you. You should be given the opportunity to ask questions at the end of your interview. If you are in doubt about any aspect of the post, ask.

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