Call for book proposals: Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity

Call for book series proposals: Literary & Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity
For more than a decade now, Literary and Scientific Cultures of Early Modernity, http://www.ashgate.com/LITSCI, has provided a forum for groundbreaking work on the relations between literary and scientific discourses in Europe, during a period when both fields were in a crucial moment of historical formation. We welcome proposals that address the many overlaps between modes of imaginative writing typical of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries—poetics, rhetoric, prose narrative, dramatic production, utopia—and the vocabularies, conceptual models, and intellectual methods of newly emergent ‘scientific’ fields such as medicine, astronomy, astrology, alchemy, psychology, mapping, mathematics, or natural history. In order to reflect the nature of intellectual inquiry during the period, the series is interdisciplinary in orientation and publishes monographs, edited collections, and selected critical editions of primary texts relevant to an understanding of the mutual implication of literary and scientific epistemologies.
As the series continues to evolve, we particularly seek submissions to do with:
·         alchemy
·         science in the New World
·         meteorology
·         knowledge networks
·         global science
·         machines
·         poetics and science
·         navigation/mapmaking
 
To submit a proposal, or for more information, please contact: Erika Gaffney, Publishing Manager,egaffney@ashgate.com
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Material Cultures of Early Modern Women’s Writing

November sees the publication of a collection of essay, Material Culture of Early Modern Women’s Writing, edited by Patricia Pender and Ros Smith and  sponsored by the Early Modern Women’s Research Network. Many of these essays arise out of papers delivered at the Reading Early Modern Studies Conference in 2013.

Material Cultures of Early Modern Women's Writing

Material Cultures of Early Modern Women’s Writing

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EMRC Seminar: Hannah Newton

On Wednesday 12th November, Dr Hannah Newton will speak on ‘The Sick Child in Early Modern England, 1580-1720’, the title of her recent book published by OUP,

Hannah Newton, The Sick Child in Early Modern England, 1580-1720.

Hannah Newton, The Sick Child in Early Modern England, 1580-1720.

at 1.15pm in HUMMS 127, University of Reading.

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The American Society of Church History and the Ecclesiastical History Society (EHS)

The American Society of Church History and the Ecclesiastical History Society (EHS) will hold a joint meeting in in Oxford, UK 3-5 April 2014. The primary theme of the conference is Migration and Mission in Christian History. Further details may be found here: http://www.churchhistory.org/conferences-meetings/

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Prize-winning essay

An essay by EMRC member, Rebecca Bullard, has been awarded the Sylvia Bowerbank Award 2013 by the International Margaret Cavendish Society. Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, was an extraordinary woman — one of the first female scientists in England, she was also a political exile who spent the Civil Wars in continental Europe on account of her royalist beliefs. Rebecca’s essay, ‘Gatherings in Exile: Interpreting the Bibliographical Structure of Natures Pictures Drawn by Fancies Pencil to the Life (1656)’, published in the journal English Studies, takes a closer look at the physical composition of the large folio volumes that Cavendish published throughout the 1650s while she was in exile. It argues that we can read the material structure of Margaret Cavendish’s volume — the way it was constructed out of folded and bound sheets of paper — as a form of autobiography.

Like many researchers at the University of Reading, Rebecca is interested in tracing the ways in which the physical or material aspects of early modern books might be read and interpreted alongside their literary characteristics.

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Palgrave ‘Early Modern Literature in History’ series at the Reading Early Modern Studies Conference

This year’s conference features sessions and a book exhibit celebrating the long and continuing success of the book series affiliated to the Early Modern Research Centre at Reading, Early Modern Literature in History.  Its founding editor and current co-editor Cedric Brown began the series in 1997 in association with the high-profile international Literature and History conferences inaugurated at that time.  The list has now grown to more than 60 titles and includes the work of scholars from many countries.

The 2013 conference programme includes two sessions sponsored by EMILH, one chaired by Cedric Brown, the other by Andrew Hadfield (the other current co-editor), both sessions built around recent work published in the series.  EMLIH is also in collaboration with the Australian research group, Early Modern Women Research Network (EMWRN), associated with several recent and forthcoming volumes in the series and the sponsor of a series of sessions at the conference.

There will be a book display dedicated to the series, showing not just current and recent titles but the whole range going back to the founding titles in 1997.  The co-editors wish to thank Palgrave-Macmillan for their co-operation in mounting this display.

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Literature, theatre and the arts in the Italian Academies, 1525-1700

The Italian Academies Project is hosting a one-day conference at the University of Reading on Monday 24 June, 2013. The plenary lecture will be delivered by Professor Roberto Gigliucci (La Sapienza, Rome), who will speak on “The Academies and the Creation of New Genres between the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries”. The Italian Academies Project is a collaborative research project between the British Library, Royal Holloway University of London and the University of Reading, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). For the programme, visit http://italianacademies.org/.

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Reading Early Modern Studies Conference

Each July, scholars from around the world meet at the Reading Early Modern Studies conference to debate current issues in the field. This year, our plenary speakers are Professor Benjamin Kaplan, from University College, London, who will speak on ‘ “Between Them Sleeps the Devil”: The Tribulations of An Interfaith Couple in the Eighteenth Century’, and Professor Virginia Cox, from New York University, whose lecture ‘Anthologizing Early Modern Italian Women’s Lyric’ coincides with the publication of her edition Lyric Poetry by Women of the Italian Renaissance, the first modern anthology of verse by Italian women of this period. The conference is also hosting a very rich strand of papers sponsored by Early Modern Women’s Research Network. A highlight of the first evening will be a very rare performance of Lady Jane Lumley’s adaptation of Euripides’ Iphigenia At Aulis, which is the first translation of Euripides into English and the first known dramatic work by a woman in English. The conference will also celebrate the publication of the sixtieth title in the Early Modern Literature in History series at Palgrave MacMillan, which has a long-standing affiliation with the Early Modern Research Centre at Reading, whose origins can be traced back to the very first early modern studies conference at Reading held almost twenty-five years ago in 1989, ‘Politics, Patronage and Literature in England’. For further details of the conference, including a copy of the draft programme, see:http://www.reading.ac.uk/emrc/conferences/emrc-conference.aspx.

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Printed Image and Decorative Print, 1500-1750 , Friday 22 March, 2013

pontani

The EMRC is hosting a one-day colloquium this Friday on the ‘Printed Image and Decorative Print, 1500-1750’. Eric Kindel will speaking in the morning session on ‘Recording knowledge: Christiaan Huygens and the invention of stencil duplicating’, and James Mosley on ‘A Buried Text and an Unknown Iconography of the Making of Books: the Description des Arts et Métiers of the Académie Royale des Sciences, Paris’. In the afternoon, Clare Backhouse will give a presentation on ‘Ballad Pictures in Seventeenth-Century England: Conventions of Representation’ and Angela McShane on ‘Rethinking the Unstable Image: Kings, Queens and Cobblers on Seventeenth-Century English Ballads’. At lunchtime there will be an exhibition of early modern printed material from Reading Special Collections and Typography.

 
 

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Paul’s Cross and Our Democratic Heritage, Sept. 24

Seminar on St Paul’s Cross: Preachers, People and Power

 Date: 25th September 2012 Venue: Wren Suite, St Paul’s Cathedral Time: 3.00pm – 4.30pm

Paul’s Cross, located in the gardens of St Paul’s Cathedral, has been considered one of the great symbols of free speech and democracy in England.  This seminar will explore what truth lies behind often romanticised ideas about the area, using historical scholarship to inform public discussion of the obligations and responsibilities of interpreting this democratically resonant part of London.
This session is one of two being held on the day in conjunction with Our Democratic Heritage.  The academic exploration of the afternoon session will be coupled with another seminar event in the evening exploring the modern context.

Speakers:
Dr Peter McCullough – Professor of English and Fellow of Lincoln College Oxford, Lay Canon of St Paul’s Cathedral.

Dr Mary Morrissey – Lecturer, Department of English and American Literature University of Reading, Author of Politics and Paul’s Cross Sermons, 1558-1642 (Oxford 2011).

Dr David Colclough – Senior Lecturer, School of English and Drama, Queen Mary, University of London.  Author of Freedom of Speech in Early Stuart England (Cambridge 2005).

 This session will be Chaired by Dr Dan Plesch – Co-Founder of Our Democratic Heritage.

This seminar is free and open to all. Spaces are limited so registration is required to attend. If you would like to register please contact institute@stpaulscathedral.org.uk or call 020 7489 1011.

http://www.stpaulsinstitute.org.uk/Events/St-Pauls-Cross-Preachers-People-and-Power

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