Just a few images of the Myerscough lawn. The season is changing and the lawn is quieting down for the winter, but there are still places for the eyes to wander. I for one never get bored of the complexity that develops.

I find myself just looking and contemplating, it’s almost like a soothing meditation – although inevitably my eye spots a blade or two of the grasses that need removing. I also find I quite like to tend to the task, somehow taking care of the lawn has a therapeutic effect too. Looking after a thing of beauty (to my eyes anyway) somehow doesn’t seem a hardship.

Myerscough lawn tangle 1

Myerscough lawn tangle 1

Myerscough lawn tangle 3

Myerscough lawn tangle 2

The blue pea Parachetus communis beats the frost this year.

The blue pea Parachetus communis beats the frost this year.

I was recently invited to the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) in Uppsala to give a talk on tapestry lawns. It seems that T-lawns create debate wherever they are discussed. Generating as much scepticism and confusion as admiration and enthusiasm. A key question was would they work in Sweden? It is hard to say with any certainty yay or nay on that point, but Sweden has many of the same useable plant species and maybe its worth a try? A public survey carried out by Professor Maria Ignatieva’s LAWN research team at the university indicated that there was roughly a 50/50 split between those who thought it was a good idea and those that couldn’t see themselves finding it comfortable to walk or sit on flowering plants.

Remarkable how some can walk on a flowering daisy or clover without much thought in a grass lawn but find it uncomfortable in a T-lawn. Certainly I have one student that now makes it almost a habit to stride across the Myerscough lawn whenever he gets the chance, and another young hortic surprised me when he said he’d thought T-lawns had been around for ages since it was such an obvious garden feature to have. I’m not sure what I make of that, but it did make me smile.