Remaining in the EU “disastrous”

It seems increasingly likely that the EU referendum we’ve been promised is going to happen sooner rather than later – potentially this year, not 2017 as originally expected.

Given that, the messages being put out by ministers are becoming louder and louder. A prominent Eurosceptic in the Conservative Cabinet, Chris Grayling, yesterday wrote in the Telegraph that staying in the EU would be “disastrous” for the UK.

It’s not clear exactly what it is about “more Europe” (vaguely defined) that would be particularly disastrous as far as Grayling is concerned – this isn’t made clear. Reference is made to immigration, although again immigration is simply implied to be a bad thing, since apparently the current levels should not be sustained moving forward (only half of our net inward migration flows are actually from the EU, it’s worth bearing in mind).

Grayling talks about some aspects of the economic idea behind the EU: the single market, or common market: common standards across countries so that exporters aren’t having to match a whole range of different standards for different countries. There then appears to be a misunderstanding about exactly how that would be achieved, because Grayling complains about “giving the EU more and more scope to involve itself in matters that were once the preserve of national governments.”

If a group of countries all have different product standards and regulations, and they agree a common market where these must be harmonised, then clearly each of those countries must give up powers that were once their preserve. It cannot be that a common market can exist where each country can still decide to set its own regulations a bit different for a bit for some reason or another – that would then cease to be a common market.