Brexit Referendum: So it all begins!

As was fully expected, the UK In/Out referendum will happen on June 23. Which way will you vote?

If the 48 hours or so since this was announced is anything to go by, it promises to absolutely dominate all news headlines between now and then. So expect to be thoroughly bored by it all by the time June comes around.

However, please as students of the economy, don’t get bored and switch off until you’ve worked out what the right decision is on June 23. This is a huge decision for the UK economy, as hopefully what we’ve learnt in Intro Macro has taught you already.

Everything we’ve learnt about has had implications and applications in the EU debate.

We started with economic growth, and the kinds of conditions that would foster higher trend economic growth, looking at the supply side of the economy, and Total Factor Productivity. This is the most fundamental question we have to ponder: what impact does EU membership have on our trend growth rate? At the moment, most commentators are focussed on relative positions in the business cycle (UK better, EU not so good). But (1) the work of Robert Lucas was cited in our lectures to point out that trend growth is hugely more important than business cycle fluctuations, and (b) it’s been far from always this way, and indeed for much of the post-war economic history, European growth has been stronger than UK growth. Is that a reason for thinking about staying then? I’d argue probably not, I’d suggest you should think about why it might be that trend growth might increase or decrease.

We covered unemployment after that. Isn’t unemployment higher because of free movement of labour, meaning that cheap labour from Eastern Europe can come over and take all “our jobs”? This argument covers over a lot of important detail. Firstly, there isn’t some fixed supply of jobs, which we alluded to by thinking about shifts in labour demand curves. Hence it may be that by having Eastern European migrants here, more is produced in the UK economy, and hence more jobs become available.

Which jobs are being taken? By and large, it’s lower skilled (or unskilled) jobs. And the problem with these kinds of jobs is that they are equally the first to go in economic downturns, and are the easier jobs to be replaced by computers and automation. Hence unskilled labour is under threat from immigration, but equally it’s under threat from the machines.

We can carry on going through the course so far, and I’ll be trying in lecture to relate things we cover to the EU Brexit debate, since it matters hugely. At the outset I’ll make it clear: I think, having thought a lot about the issues, and looked at the arguments in favour of leaving in particular, that the UK is much better off inside the EU. That doesn’t mean some killer argument for leaving isn’t lurking around the corner, and I’ll encourage you to find that killer argument – it’s very important you, and we as a class, have considered all possible arguments, and been rigorous about them, before deciding which way to vote.