Challenge yourself, first edition

University is entirely about personal development in all areas of your life. Developing almost always involves having preconceived ideas challenged. This can be a disconcerting experience – things you previously thought to be true you may find are anything but.

As students of economics, your lecturers and class tutors are most likely to do this in the sphere of economic ideas. It’s very easy, too, as there’s a huge range of economic ideas once you start looking, and the internet makes these much easier to come across than ever before. Every economist, or everyone who would like to think of themselves as an economist, can write a blog.

While this presents risks (who are the ones to believe and treat with respect, which ones are we safe to ignore?), it presents huge opportunities. One particular school of thought, much more common in the US than here, is libertarianism. Libertarian economists place a huge amount of attention on individual liberty, questioning the ability of others, and in particular institutions, to make decisions on behalf of individuals.

If you think that needn’t challenge you, it’s worth thinking a bit deeper. That the government sets a minimum wage is an example where an institution (the government) thinks it knows better than firms and individuals about how markets work, and what the right price would be. It impinges on the liberty of a firm to set a wage, and for an employee to accept a particular wage – if it’s below what is legally mandated.

Here’s an article from today on immigration, which is written by a libertarian economist: “Schengen, Adieu” by Alberto Mingardi. It’s written at theĀ blog of the Library of Economics and Liberty, which gives a strong hint that it is libertarian. It asks the question: how do we “control” borders? Can we really think about controlling borders? We probably can if we erect big walls, and employ huge amounts of people to police the border. But we probably also then need to police things inside our country too, in order to make sure that those that have arrived aren’t doing certain things we don’t like (say, claiming benefits, or access to healthcare).

The problem with all of this is that it will impinge on the liberty of those of us native here. We’ll have much more faff and hassle when leaving the country to go elsewhere – for example,longer queues at the border, as anyone who has taken the ferry or Eurotunnel to France will testify. Additionally, we will find much more stringent checks when we do things we used to take for granted. We’ll be asked when applying for jobs to prove our immigration status even though we come from this country and always have.

Employers will have to devote much greater attention to compliance; the University of Reading has to check what its students from overseas are up to, which then eats into the time of lecturers to lecture, and class tutors to teach (and research). Governments have to employ more and more people to police borders and monitor those that enter, causing greater costs and a larger state.

None of this is to say that “controlling” our borders is not a bad thing; clearly nobody wants to have terrorists from overseas entering our country and prowling our streets without any checks taking place. But it’s to say that the controlling will have implications.

And more broadly, it’s to challenge any preconceptions you might have when thinking about immigration, a very real issue facing us at the moment. Should you do this? You certainly should challenge those views if it means you are less likely to support policy proposals that may be ineffective and have a lot of unforeseen consequences.