The UK-EU Deal

Today we have found out what all the renegotiation was about: the possibility that the UK might be able to put a stop temporarily to in-work benefits being paid to EU nationals working in the UK (assuming other EU countries are happy with this happening in any particular situation).

If that sounds a little underwhelming, it is probably because it is, which must be both good and bad.

Good, since there is no dramatic altering of the right of free movement of labour within the EU, as was hoped by some in the Conservative Party. As we’ve just covered in unemployment in our lectures, labour mobility is a good thing. Yes, it does lead to more uncertainty for us since there’s a larger pool of labour potentially for any job we do, but equally it gives both us, and firms, great opportunities to move into new jobs that are better suited to us, and better suited to firms. Workers aren’t restricted simply on the basis of a passport within the EU from taking their ideal job, and equally, firms aren’t stopped from recruiting the ideal worker for the post they’ve advertised because the ideal worker doesn’t have the right (European) passport.

Bad, since those hoping for big reforms in order to vote to remain may well be unhappy with this rather weak deal. Those seeking the UK’s exit claim that the UK gets little back from the EU, and simply gets told what to do. Rules and regulations we just have to accept are made in Brussels, not Westminster. This outcome, which reflects on Cameron’s inability to get what members in his party would ideally have hoped for (ability to stop inward migration unilaterally, plus other grabs back of national sovereignty). As I’ve written before on this blog, and mentioned in lecture, such issues regarding sovereignty clash with the reality of a common market – we can’t be involved in a common market without a common regulatory structure determined by some central regulatory body.

On balance, will it leave the UK any closer to the exit door? This is obviously impossible to say; even opinion polls can only give so much insight.

Will it even matter? Clara Sanderlind makes the point here that since most EU migrants working in the UK don’t claim in-work (or out of work) benefits, the deal will make no difference whatsoever to actual flows of migrants.

This week in lectures we’re covering trade and globalisation, topics which have so many obvious applications into the current UK relationship with the EU. See you later in the week!