Unemployment Down but a Rate Rise Unlikely

Two macroeconomic stories have adorned the main headlines on the BBC website in the last 24 hours.

First, Mark Carney, current Governor of the Bank of England, ruled out interest rate rises in the near future – highly unlikely in 2016, it seems. Then this morning the news is that unemployment, the number of people not in work but seeking work (hence counted as part of the labour force) is at its lowest level since 2005.

As with many economic variables, a change in any direction is not unambiguously a good thing; for interest rates, which have been low for many years now, this is good for borrowers (for example, people with mortgages to buy houses), but bad for savers. This is because the rate the Bank of England sets heavily influences the rates set by banks around the country, so borrowers will continue to have to pay back their loans on lower interest rates, but savers will continue to earn very little interest on their savings.

The reality that the Bank doesn’t think a rate rise is likely implies the Bank thinks the prospects for economic growth are not so great; this comes on the back of the Chancellor’s warning about a dangerous cocktail of factors affecting UK growth in the coming year. Prospects for growth have reduced.

This comes, though, in stark contrast to the good news from the labour market. That unemployment is falling is generally a good thing – it’s hard to think of particularly convincing reasons why it wouldn’t be. Sometimes people point out that the fall might be based only on workers going into short-term or zero-hours contracts, or part-time or self-employment, all of which are seen as less secure jobs for workers, and signs not of high confidence amongst employers.

It may also be that some are back to work, but the 5% that remain have been out of work for a long time and are starting to become discouraged. If people have stopped looking for work, they stop being classed as unemployed and hence the unemployment rate can fall due to this. It is quite standard that after recessions the number of long-term unemployed increases, and while this does not excuse the reality or make light of it, it does present a problem for the government in attempting to find policies to get such people back into the workforce.