Unemployment Down but a Rate Rise Unlikely

Two macroeconomic stories have adorned the main headlines on the BBC website in the last 24 hours.

First, Mark Carney, current Governor of the Bank of England, ruled out interest rate rises in the near future – highly unlikely in 2016, it seems. Then this morning the news is that unemployment, the number of people not in work but seeking work (hence counted as part of the labour force) is at its lowest level since 2005.

As with many economic variables, a change in any direction is not unambiguously a good thing; for interest rates, which have been low for many years now, this is good for borrowers (for example, people with mortgages to buy houses), but bad for savers. This is because the rate the Bank of England sets heavily influences the rates set by banks around the country, so borrowers will continue to have to pay back their loans on lower interest rates, but savers will continue to earn very little interest on their savings.

The reality that the Bank doesn’t think a rate rise is likely implies the Bank thinks the prospects for economic growth are not so great; this comes on the back of the Chancellor’s warning about a dangerous cocktail of factors affecting UK growth in the coming year. Prospects for growth have reduced.

This comes, though, in stark contrast to the good news from the labour market. That unemployment is falling is generally a good thing – it’s hard to think of particularly convincing reasons why it wouldn’t be. Sometimes people point out that the fall might be based only on workers going into short-term or zero-hours contracts, or part-time or self-employment, all of which are seen as less secure jobs for workers, and signs not of high confidence amongst employers.

It may also be that some are back to work, but the 5% that remain have been out of work for a long time and are starting to become discouraged. If people have stopped looking for work, they stop being classed as unemployed and hence the unemployment rate can fall due to this. It is quite standard that after recessions the number of long-term unemployed increases, and while this does not excuse the reality or make light of it, it does present a problem for the government in attempting to find policies to get such people back into the workforce.

Global Monetary Policy

While our focus is often just on what the Bank of England is up to¬†(speaking of which, today is December’s interest rate announcement from the Bank of England), there are other more important central banks out there, most notably the European Central Bank (ECB), and the Federal Reserve, representing the eurozone and the US respectively.

This article in the Guardian worries about what seems likely to happen this month: the US will tighten monetary policy while the ECB will loosen policy further.

Why does this matter? The worry is of considerable exchange rate movements. As we’ll learn towards the end of next term, one of the ways in which we believe exchange rates move in the shorter term as economists is via relative interest rate movements. This is because rates of interest reflect how much an investor could earn by moving their wealth into that country.

Hence, everything else being equal, if interest rates are higher in the US than in the eurozone, it is feared people will move their wealth out of European assets into US-based assets, increasing the demand for US dollars, and reducing the demand for euros. This would then lead to an appreciation in the value of the dollar (more demand), and a depreciation in the value of the euro (less demand). This need not be a bad thing, since a recovering economy ought to be aided by a weaker currency.

Of course things aren’t necessarily that simple; if eurozone producers use goods imported from the US to make their goods, and if eurozone consumption is often of US-produced goods, then eurozone economic activity would likely be negatively affected by the movements.

The bottom line is that larger than normal exchange rate movements ought to be expected in the coming months…

Inflation is still Deflation

united-kingdom-inflation-cpiThis morning the latest inflation numbers have been released: -0.1%. That is, deflation. The Consumer Price Index, what the Bank of England uses to measure inflation, has barely changed since February – see above. To give some context, the Bank of England’s inflation forecasts since February have all suggested inflation would have risen back up to around¬†0.5% by now, yet persistently inflation is around zero.

Why does this matter? It matters on a number of levels; to mention a few:

  • Inflation is seen as a barometer of how well the economy is doing. Strong demand across the economy, given a fairly fixed supply, would yield inflation, and hence this suggests the economy is far from capacity (where supply would be fairly fixed).
  • Inflation is what the Bank of England must set its monetary policy to influence. The target is 2% with a 1% band either side, and hence inflation is below target. In this situation, the Bank might be expected to try and generate a bit of inflation to push back towards its target, yet interest rates, the tool the Bank uses, are already at their (effective) lower bound of 0.5%. It certainly doesn’t suggest the Bank is about to raise interest rates, another fear some have.
  • Inflation is the norm. Deflation has not been; I noted the one historical deflationary UK episode a few weeks ago. Japan has found itself fixed in zero/negative inflation territory for a long time now – it’s not the norm, and at least as far as Japan, and possibly increasingly the UK, are finding, it’s unexpectedly persistent too.

We’ll spend time looking at inflation next term…

Bank of England keeps interest rates on hold

On the first Thursday of the month (or the second, it seems, if the first is the 1st), the Bank of England’s Monetary Policy Committee meets to decide on monetary policy in the UK. At midday on that Thursday, they announce what they have decided to do; it’s just been announced that interest rates will remain at 0.5%, where they have been now for over five years. Here’s the entire history of the Bank of England “base rate”, which is the rate it sets monthly:

You’ll note that the rate reached 0.5% before 2011 (right at the end of the chart), and it’s still there. It’s one of the longest spells without a change for decades.

The MPC is a group of economists, both ones that work for the Bank of England, and a group of external members, often university professors and economists that work in the private sector. The idea is that they apply a wide range of expertise and experience on the UK economy to policymaking decisions. They are trying to hit a target of 2% inflation, that the UK government sets for them, but at the moment inflation is around 0, hence below target.

Prior to this, inflation spent a number of years above target, and perhaps as a result, there have been a number who have called openly for a rethink about the Bank of England’s role in policymaking, not least the new Labour Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer.

We’ll consider monetary policy in about week 8 or 9 next term, once we’ve considered the various constituent parts of what the MPC thinks about when making decisions: inflation, growth, consumption, investment, money, interest rates and banking.