Macroeconomic Uncertainty

Today’s BBC headline is the Chancellor warning about a “‘dangerous cocktail’ of economic risks” facing the UK economy in 2016, suggesting this year will be the toughest since the financial crisis. It’s more politics than economics as one reads what the Chancellor actually said in a BBC Radio 4 interview this morning, representing expectations management: after all the positive talk about the economy by the Conservatives before the election and since, things have changed somewhat in recent months to challenge that outlook.

One of those things was that GDP growth for 2015Q3 was revised down – not by a huge amount, from 0.5% to 0.4% – but a downward revision nonetheless, and along with other downward revisions has meant that the UK grew significantly less in 2015 than was previously thought.

Another is the continued low oil price which, while great at the petrol pump for the paying customer, has mixed impacts on the UK economy which does export oil.

Perhaps most interest, however, is to also consider the Independent’s take on the Chancellor’s recent actions (as well as rhetoric): it talks about the role that economic forecasts played in the Chancellor’s budget giveaway in the Autumn Statement in November, noting that they might have been “potentially unreliable”. We noted here at the time that the budget giveaway did rely heavily on forecasts for GDP growth: governments need forecasts of economic growth in order to project the tax receipts they will get, and the amounts of benefits they’ll have to pay out, which heavily influences the level of the budget deficit/surplus. If growth now comes in lower than was forecast, this will almost certainly mean that the budget deficit will be worse than expected, casting doubt on the ability of the UK economy to meet the Chancellor’s new Fiscal Charter: to balance the budget in normal economic times.

As well as lecturing Introductory Macroeconomics this term and hence covering issues mentioned here in greater depth, I’ll also be lecturing a third year course on forecasting, where we will discuss the kinds of methods that are used to produce the kinds of forecasts that underly government budget decisions like these. Many of our undergraduate students take placements and graduate roles with the Government Economic Service, which could see them being placed in the Treasury, hence right in the centre of the process of generating those forecasts. What you are doing here as a student could play a crucial role in shaping the future of our country!