Congratulations to our USSU National Mock Trial Competition team

Mikhailis Moulagiannis and Katie Stephens

Congratulations to our team of first year LLB students, Katie Stephens and Mikhailis Moulagiannis on their exceptional performance at the USSU National Mock Trial Competition, coming second. The final round was held in Kingston Crown Court in front of HHJ Sarah Plaschkes QC. The trials were based on various areas of criminal law, such as blackmail and drug dealing. Our team competed against Swansea University in a case regarding large quantities of Class A Drugs.

The teams were scored based on knowledge of the case, application of facts, advocacy skills, overall presentation and ability to adapt, and the top teams from each round went through to the next.
The competition was organised through the University of Surrey Law Society as a national competition sponsored by the University of Law.

It teaches you a lot about working as a team and how crucial attention to detail and knowing the case is” – Katie Stephens

Hague University Visit

On May 17, 2019, Dr Andrea Miglionico attended the LLM Fair at The Hague University of Applied Sciences (THUAS). He met the Dean of the Law Faculty and the Vice-President of the European Commission and presented the wide offering of the School’s programmes to the University’s students.

2nd Year Law students at the SEDA Conference 2019

Year two students Megan Bennett and Tom Fuller presented at the SEDA Conference in Belfast (Staff & Educational Development Association) on 9th May 2019. They had been awarded a student bursary by SEDA to present our collaborative project, and they also took part in a panel answering questions from the audience. Megan and Tom , had been part of a core group of five students working with Amanda Millmore and Dr. Annika Newnham (academics from the School of Law) to design assessments for a new module, which embed employability skills. The five students in the core group were Megan and Tom, plus Jess Davies, Teresa Chew & Krissy Hiu. These students ran focus groups with other second year law students, and collaborated in the design of the assessments, and the new module Children, Families and the State is going to be running for their year group as a Final Year optional module in September 2019 with the employability skills focused assessments. The project was awarded money under the PLanT projects scheme in 2018/19.

Nuclear weapons might save the world from an asteroid strike…

but we need to change the law first.

The Conversation published an article by Professor James Green (School of Law) on law changes that are needed before nuclear weapons could realistically be used to destroy an asteroid heading for Earth, in the style of the film Armageddon.

This piece has also been covered in the Metro, Newsweek and MSN news.

UoR School of Law Launchpad Pancake Race

© S2S Photography. Paul Clarke

The annual Launchpad Reading pancake race has been run on Broad Street for over 20 years to raise money for the Launchpad homelessness charity. Teams from local businesses batter it out, egged on by cheering crowds.

This year a team from the undergraduate land law module at the University of Reading School of Law, comprising of second year students Sarah Lister, Sarah Turner and Emma Francis and lecturer Adrian Aronsson-Storrier participated in the race.

The University of Reading Law School won Best Fundraiser for raising £1000 in five days.

Please follow the link below to see more details and to donate!

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/launchpadlandlawfundraiser

Ruvi Ziegler’s letter to The Times on immigration from the EU

You can read the letter in thetimes.co.uk here.   The full text of the letter is as follows:

Sir, Clare Foges notes that net immigration from the EU has dropped to its lowest level in a decade. She implies that the UK’s approach to family migration from non-European Economic Area countries, including the “minimum income” requirement (which the Supreme Court described in 2017 as “particularly harsh”), has been too lax. Our fellow EU27 citizens rightly feel that, since 2016, Britain has become a less welcoming place for them and their families. The idea of a pecking order of “desirable migrants” may serve only to exacerbate this feeling.
Dr Ruvi Ziegler
Associate professor in international refugee law, University of Reading