Borrowing and opening hours over Easter

With the Easter vacation approaching, make sure you know our upcoming opening hours and borrowing policies for the break!

Opening hours

Our opening hours will be changing over the Easter Vacation period.

Between Monday 1 and Friday 5 April the Library Building will be open from 09:00-17:00.

Between Monday 1 and Thursday 4 April the Library@URS Building will be open from 08:30-19:00. On Friday 5 April it will be open from 08:30-17:00.

Between Saturday 6 and Tuesday 16 April we will revert to normal term-time opening hours. 

Both Library buildings will be closed for the University Easter Closure between Wednesday 17 and Monday 22 April.

Please see our opening hours webpage for more information.

Borrowing

To help with all that revision over the break, it will be ‘business as usual’ with loan periods remaining the same in vacation as all term. However, no items will be due for return between Wednesday 17 and Monday 22 April; during the University closure period.

Please keep up to date with your Library account as due dates could change as items are recalled.

More information

Please visit our website for more information. 

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services.

Language for Resilience exhibition comes to UoR Library

Bronze reflective light fittings above flimsy poster on frame

The British Council’s Language for Resilience exhibitionruns until 29 March at Reading.

In partnership with the University, the British Council has brought the Language for Resilience exhibition to Reading. Running until 29 March, this free and public exhibition is hosted in the University Library building’s new exhibition space on its ground floor, created as part of the Library Refurbishment Project.

Based on research by the University’s Dr Tony Capstick and in collaboration with international institutions across the Middle East, Africa, EU and Americas, this interactive exhibition demonstrates the ways language is used to build resilience among the millions of people that have been displaced from their homes by conflict and civil unrest.

Language learning is imperative to helping refugees and communities overcome miscommunications and social barriers. This exhibition is a valuable opportunity to understand the challenges associated with building resilience, and gives a voice to the young people and adults who deserve to have their stories heard.

Exhibiton posters on frames and boxes containing masks and shoes

The Language for Resilience exhibition celebrates items used in teaching languages as well as people involved.

Refugees displaced by conflict often find themselves far from home, without essential language skills for even basic communication, which hinders the education and career opportunities for both themselves and their children. The exhibition aims to break down barriers by protecting the use of refugee’s home languages and allowing refugee communities to integrate with their host communities so they can feel valued within their new society. Building language resilience will reduce isolation and play a huge role in helping create a safe space for refugees to address the trauma caused by their displacement.

As it stands, only 1 to 5 percent of young refugees are currently enrolled in a university programme in their host countries. Improving language skills will allow more refugees to access the information required to progress in the education system and start to rebuild their lives.

For more information please visit the project Language for Resilience website. To learn more about language and migration research at the University of Reading, please visit the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator with Tim Yates, Marketing Communications and Engagement Team

Planning your revision – info tip

Boy reading in sunshineEaster’s coming up fast, and you’re probably still completing assignments for the end of term. Exams might still seem a long way off now but they’ll be here before you know it. It’s a good time to start thinking about your revision – and the Library and Study Advice are here to help.

Working out a schedule

It’s important to have a plan, to make sure you have time to cover all the topics you need to. Avoid making your revision plan too detailed and prescriptive though – you will need to build in time for relaxation, exercise – and the unexpected!

The Study Advice guide on preparing for exams includes tips for planning your revision, including how to work out your revision schedule. You might also find our video tutorials on time management helpful – we have tips on planning and avoiding procrastination, for instance.

Finding materials for revision

You will probably start by reading through your lecture notes, and then looking at texts on your reading list. The Library has guidance on finding different types of publication as well as videos that will help you to get the most out of the Library.

You should also check the subject resources and guidance for information resources in your topic – much more reliable than ‘just Googling it’. And remember that, whether you’re revising on or off campus, our ebooks and ejournals are accessible 24/7.

Where will you revise?

It’s good to think about the place that you study best. Some students prefer to study at home or in Halls, and 24/7 access to e-resources makes this a viable option without taking mountains of books home. If you do this, make sure you make a schedule and stick to it – it’s easy to watch just one more episode of that box set!

Many students prefer to study in the Library, and study spaces will be available in the URS Building and the Library as usual. However it’s worth considering some of the other places to study on campus; being somewhere different may help you to avoid distractions. Or consider other places off-campus like public libraries. Going to a new place that you’ve identified as a ‘place to do revision’ can help you to focus.

Wherever you revise, remember to take breaks. Library@URS may be open 24 hours but that doesn’t mean you have to work through the night – your brain needs rest and time for processing information.

Making your revision effective

If you can find six minutes in your busy schedule, you have enough time to watch the Study Advice video tutorial on effective revision – and save yourself a lot of wasted time. Our guide on preparing for exams also has tips on revision and memory techniques. If you’re taking exams in the UK for the first time, have a look at our information on assessment by examination in UK higher education to give you a clearer idea of how they may differ from what you have done in the past.

Remember that the purpose of revision is not to memorise everything you can find about the subject, but to prepare yourself to answer exam questions. Check the Past Paper archive on the Exams Office website to find examples of questions for your modules which you can use to write practice answers – to time and by hand, ideally. We have a Study Seminar on Writing for University Exams on Wed 20 March 2019, 2-3pm in Edith Morley G25 – no need to book. And have a look at our video tutorials on exams for guidance on the best way to prepare for different kinds of exams.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Kim Shahabudin, Michelle Reid, Sonia Hood and Linda Shroeder (Study Advice team).

The age of extremes?

newspapers

We currently have trial access to Political Extremism and Radicalism in the Twentieth Century. This resource provides online access to a range of documents and audio recordings, such as campaigning materials, propaganda, government records, various ephemera and oral histories, covering the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The archive focuses on political extremism and radical thought in the UK, Europe, Australia and North America, making it one of the first digital archives on far-right and left political groups.

Access is available on-campus and off-campus until 11th April.

If you have any comments about this resource, good or bad, please send them to Charlie Carpenter, Liaison Librarian for History: c.a.carpenter@reading.ac.uk

 

Lindsay Warwick, E-resources Team

Referencing workshops for Undergraduate and Masters students

Open book on a laptopThere are spaces still available on our upcoming EndNote Online and Mendeley workshops for undergraduates and masters students.

Come along to these beginners workshops to learn how to …

  • store details of the books and articles you read
  • download references from databases such as the Web of Science
  • insert citations in your Word documents
  • build a bibliography in a style of your choosing at the click of a button

Workshop times

  • Wednesday 13 March, 14:00 – 15:30 (EndNote Online)
  • Wednesday 21 March, 14.00-15.00 (Mendeley)

Book your place

Book your place via the ‘Library course bookings’ link on the RISISweb portal. The bookings link is located in the ‘Actions’ tab.

These workshops are part of the Student Training and Experience Programme (STEP) and count towards the RED Award.

Unable to make this date?

If you can’t make either of these sessions but would like to know more, take a look at our reference management guide or contact your Liaison Librarian.

Sally Smith, Learning Support Co-ordinator

Looking east – the East India Company

Old looking shipWe currently have trial access to East India Company: India Office Records from the British Library, 1599-1947. This online archival collection provides access to a range of documents, such as minutes of council meetings, council resolutions, charters and correspondence, from the Company’s charter in 1600 to Indian independence in 1947. The archive tells the story of trade with the East; politics; and the rise and fall of the British Empire. It will be of interest to those studying or researching British imperial history; maritime trade; global commerce, and the history of the first great multinational corporation.

Access is available on-campus and off-campus until 4th April 2019.

Help us to decide

If you have an comments about this resource, good or bad, please send them to Charlie Carpenter, Liaison Librarian for History: c.a.carpenter@reading.ac.uk

 

Sophie Dorman, E-resources Team

Check out artists videos on Electronic Arts Intermix

Try out Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) now! We have trial access until the 10th May.

Electronipaint brushesc Arts Intermix (EAI) is a streaming service that provides access to video works by artists. The collection spans the mid 60s to the present. It includes works by established artists and new works by emerging artists.

This is also available on-campus and off-campus.

Help us to decide

Please send any comments on this resource to Karen Drury and Ruth Ng, Liaison Librarians for Art- karenandruth@reading.ac.uk

Lindsay Warwick, E-resources Team

Cite it right – and avoid unintentional plagiarism! – info tip

You may think that advice on avoiding plagiarism doesn’t apply to you, because you’re not planning to buy an essay from the internet, or copy someone else’s work. But you may not be aware that it is possible to plagiarise unintentionally if:

  • you’re not aware of the differences between referencing at university and any referencing you may have been used to doing previously;
  • you haven’t been meticulous about keeping records of your reading;
  • you don’t know how to use references in your academic writing to support your discussion and critical analysis.

It’s important to take referencing seriously and not just guess, or assume that you know how to do it. The consequences can be serious with marks deducted – it can even lead to accusations of academic misconduct.

However, it can be confusing when you have advice and guidance on referencing from so many different sources. It’s tempting to just Google it! But that’s far less likely to give you the right answer than guidance produced at your own university. You should always check your own Course Handbook first for advice (it will be on Blackboard).

Our Citing References guide combines previous guidance from the Library and Study Advice to cover the why, what, when and how of referencing in a single place. Study Advice video tutorials on referencing are embedded in the guide, which includes:

You could also look at The Academic Integrity Toolkit, which shows how understanding referencing is an important part of studying at university and ‘becoming a graduate’ generally. The Toolkit includes tips, explanations and exercises (with answers) to help you develop your understanding of essential skills including:

If you’re a Part 1 undergraduate and have enrolled on Study Smart, you could also go back over the relevant guidance in Week 1.

The guidance below focuses on three important points to help you avoid unintentional plagiarism.

References in a footnote1.Know when to include a reference

Whenever you include an idea that you have gained from your reading in an assignment, you must ensure that you reference it correctly, both in the text and at the end in your reference list or bibliography. If you use the original words you have found in your reading, you must mark them with quotation marks, even if you only use part of the sentence. It is not enough to give the details of where the words came from; they must be marked out, or it will look as if you are claiming them as your own words. If you are writing the idea up in your own words, don’t be tempted to just change a few words. If you use quotations inadequately or paraphrase badly it will certainly be viewed as poor academic practice and may subject your work to penalties. It may even be seen as plagiarism.

Watch this brief video tutorial on using paraphrases.

See Library and Study Advice guidance on using quotes and paraphrases.

2. Develop good note-taking practices

Ever looked at your notes and thought, “I wonder where that came from?” or “I wonder if those are my words or copied from the text?” It’s frustrating when you can’t be sure – but it could cause you problems if you use the material without being able to reference it accurately. To avoid this, make it a habit to have good record-keeping practices. Always note the details of each text you use (author, title, year) when you start writing notes on your reading; include page numbers as you go along, even if you are not copying text directly but writing the ideas in your own words; have a system of markers to indicate if something is a quote (put in quotation marks), an idea explained in your own words, or a query or new idea stemming from what you’re read (perhaps an asterisk *). The Study Advisers have guidance on effective note-taking and a brief video tutorial on critical note-taking with more suggestions.

If you’re using an e-book, you may be able to make notes electronically as you’re reading the text. See the section in our LibGuide on Studying with e-books for more information. If you have an online reading list, you can also make brief notes on this – our LibGuide page on What else can I do with my list? has details.

You might also consider using reference management software to keep details of your reading including all the bibliographic information. EndNote online and Mendeley are free software which work with Word to create citations and bibliographies for you.  If you’re a researcher with lots of references to manage you might choose the more sophisticated Desktop EndNote. For advice on which version to use, and for self-paced training guides on EndNote, or book a place on a training workshop, see the Library’s web pages.

3. Know what to do if you can’t find all the details of a reference

bibliographic details screencast screencapIf you have a quote but don’t know where it came from, try typing it into Google. You may find it’s better to use a short phrase rather than the whole quote; try to find a grouping of words that is less common. If you have some details of the text, you could try looking at your reading list or searching the Library catalogue. You can also look back through your Library account to see the titles of books you’ve borrowed. If you have the author and title of a journal article or even just the title of the journal and a date it may be possible to find the complete reference in Summon or one of the Library’s databases. What you must never do is invent details, or include things in your assignment if you cannot be sure about the source. This may lead to accusations of academic misconduct.

For more help watch this brief video tutorial on how to find bibliographic details.

Need more help?

If you’re still confused, or you have a specific question about referencing that isn’t answered in our guide, you can always contact your Liaison Librarian or the Study Advice team to discuss this in person. Just remember to do it in plenty of time – the day your assignment is due to be submitted is not ideal!

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Dr Kim Shahabudin, Study Adviser and Caitlin McCulloch, Trainee Liaison Librarian.

Library refurbishment: new walkway

New walkway to Library building entrance (marked in blue).

Starting this week, there will be a new temporary walkway created to access the Library building. This will allow landscaping work to be undertaken next to the Library entrance.

This new walkway (marked on the image in blue) will be slightly further away from the building. This will be used when approaching the Library from the direction of Palmer quad or Whiteknights House. Access from the direction of the URS building remains the same.

The area marked in red is where the landscaping work will be taking place. This work is due to be completed at the start of May.

Further information

To keep up to date with the latest Library refurbishment news, please visit the Library refurbishment webpage and look out for posts on this Library blog.

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian

Cuban Culture – trial access to archive

Try out the archive of Cuban Culture and Cultural Relations now! We have trial access until 22 March.

This primary source collection from 1959 onward is split into two parts, covering the culture and cultural relations of Revolutionary Cuba and countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Part 1, “Casa y cultura”, provides unique access to 45,000 documents, covering almost 60 years of cultural relations between Revolutionary Cuba and abroad.

This is available on-campus and off-campus.

Part 2, Writers, provides access to more than 63,800 digital files and records on 1,046 writers and artists .

This is also available on-campus and off-campus.

Help us to decide

Please send any comments on this resource to Katie Winter, Liaison Librarian for Modern Languages and European Studies – k.l.winter@reading.ac.uk.

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian

Try out a new census and socio-economic data service

Digimap, the online map and data delivery service, has a new trial service available. In addition to Ordnance Survey, Historic, Geology, Aerial, Environment, Marine and Global, we now have access to Society Digimap.

Society Digimap

Society Digimap example

Digimap Society logoSociety Digimap provides a wealth of census and socio-economic data for Great Britain. Although census data is available through the UK Data Service, the processing required to show census and other demographic datasets on a map can be a barrier to use for many interested in the value of the datasets. By providing these datasets as layers to visualise along with high quality Ordnance Survey data, users can access this rich information source to gain valuable insights for their areas of interest without the need to learn how to use a GIS.

Over 40 layers of data from a range of Census 2011 data, broadband availability and Output Area Classification (OAC) are available. Initially this can be mapped using a Roam mapper, but a download facility is also planned.

Is this service useful?

If you are using or planning to use this service in your teaching or research, please let us know! The trial is available until 31 July 2019.  Please send any feedback about it to Judith Fox, Digimap Site Representative.

Judith Fox, Map Librarian

Use other libraries with SCONUL Access scheme

Are you going home for a break but still want to get some research done? Or are you someone thinking of visiting our Library and want your own access card to make your visits here that much easier?

Then follow the instructions below to see if you could join the SCONUL scheme!

What is SCONUL?sconul logo

The SCONUL Access scheme is a reciprocal relationship between many university libraries across the UK and Ireland allowing members of the different institutions to make use of each other’s libraries.

What access can I get?

Depending on whether you are a full or part-time student, an undergraduate, postgraduate or staff member, you could be eligible for borrowing books or reference access to other SCONUL Access member libraries.

How do I apply?

Go to the SCONUL Access participating libraries page and select your status and home institution.  You will then see a list of all the libraries that you are eligible to use. Select the library that you wish to use and click on the ‘apply for access’ button and complete the online form.

You will receive an email authorizing your registration at all the libraries you are eligible to join.  Simply take your email and University Campus Card along to the Library you wish to access and you will be issued with your own access or library card.

Remember you only need to apply once – you can use the same email to join as many libraries as you want!

Note: Not all libraries are members of the scheme, and not all members of the scheme accept all types of users. Each library participating in SCONUL Access chooses which types of users to accept under the scheme. The SCONUL Access participating libraries page will only the display the ones you can use. If you are unsure please contact the Library.

Further information

If you are a current University of Reading student or staff member looking to use another institutions library please follow the link here.

If you are a member of another institution looking to use the University of Readings Library resources please follow the link here

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services