Borrowing and opening hours over Easter

With the Easter vacation approaching, make sure you know our upcoming opening hours and borrowing policies for the break!

Opening hours

Our opening hours will be changing over the Easter Vacation period.

Between Monday 1 and Friday 5 April the Library Building will be open from 09:00-17:00.

Between Monday 1 and Friday 5 April the Library@URS Building will be open from 08:30-19:00.

Between Saturday 6 and Tuesday 16 April we will revert to normal term-time opening hours. 

Both Library buildings will be closed for the University Easter Closure between Wednesday 17 and Monday 22 April.

Please see our opening hours webpage for more information.

Borrowing

To help with all that revision over the break, it will be ‘business as usual’ with loan periods remaining the same in vacation as all term. However, no items will be due for return between Wednesday 17 and Monday 22 April; during the University closure period.

Please keep up to date with your Library account as due dates could change as items are recalled.

More information

Please visit our website for more information. 

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services.

Library closed for Easter

The Library has now closed for the University Easter Closure period. We will re-open on Tuesday 23 April with Library@URS opening at 08:30. Please see our full opening hours for more information.

Online resources still available

Access to our online resources will stay the same despite the closure. Please use our resources as per normal via our website.

What if I have a question?

If you have a Library-related query whilst we’re not here you can still get help. Chat online via the blue ‘Virtual Enquiry Service’ box on the Library homepage. The Virtual Enquiry Service is staffed by professional librarians working remotely to answer your queries from our website and other information we’ve supplied.  You can keep an email transcript of the chat. If they can’t resolve a particular issue they’ll refer you back to us when the Library re-opens.

Enjoy the break and we look forward to seeing you again in the summer term!

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services.

 

Problems accessing resources

We are currently experiencing problems with resources that we link to via DOI. A DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a unique alphanumeric string that is used to identify content and provide a persistent link to its location on the internet. An example of a resource that links via DOI is this, http://idpproxy.reading.ac.uk/login?url=https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316338773.

Open laptop

Unfortunately one of our authentication methods is currently interfering with such linking and preventing users from accessing content. If you find a link with this problem it will take you to a webpage with a ‘Bad Gateway’ error message. This is affecting resources that are using our Proxy that link via DOI, and as such may appear in Talis, Enterprise or Summon. We are aware of the urgency of this problem and are working with the company that manages this authentication system to resolve the situation. In the meantime we have changed links in Talis and Summon so that they no longer authenticate with the proxy, these changes may take up to 48 hours to complete. Once on a platform you may need to login to a resource via the institutional sign in.

If you come across such an error message you can still access the resource by using our A-Z databases list to search for the platform the eBook or article is on, and then search the database using the title or author to find the resource.

I apologise for the inconvenience caused.

Lindsay Warwick, E-resources Team

Resolved – problems with Lexis

The problems we were experiencing accessing international content and news content on Lexis Library have now been resolved.  Open laptop

You can now access these two platforms by using the links below.

For International content these are the new on campus and off campus links.

For News content these are the new on campus and off campus links.

We will be updating the Library website with the new links shortly. In the meantime please use the above links for access to Lexis’ international and news platforms. To access all other areas of the Lexis platform please use the links found on the A-Z database.

If you are still having any problems with access, please contact us at eresourceshelp@reading.ac.uk or submit an e-resources problem report form.

Thank you for your patience during this time.

Lindsay Warwick- E-resources Team

Last call for Store and Closed Access requests!

Get your requests in before our deadlines to collect items in time for the Easter closure that are not found on our subject floors! 

  • Off-Site Store items will need to be requested before 08:15 on Monday 15 April
  • Closed Access items will need to be requested before 10:30 on Tuesday 16 April.

Normal service will resume on Tuesday 23 April with the first Closed Access collection on that day and the first Store collection on Thursday 25 April.

For more information and detailed instructions on how to make Closed Access and Store requests, check out the ‘Requesting items from Store and Closed Access‘ information page or our Store items video guide.

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services

Restricted Library/URS entry for exam-time

Despite opening extensive hours from Saturday 6 April until Friday 14 June, please note access restrictions to Library buildings. From Monday to Friday, Library space is reserved for University Campus and Library Card holders only. Visitors are only permitted at weekends with prior arrangement. This is to prevent disruption to our revising students from non-University members, right until their last exam is over.

We operate a ‘no card, no access policy’ and reserve the right to refuse access to anyone, including University members, who cannot identify themselves adequately.

How card-holders get in

You already need your campus card to enter the Library building at all times. You will also need your card to enter Library@URS after 17:00 and before 08:30 on weekdays, and all weekend. When other doors are locked, please enter by the right-hand doors of Library@URS. Card-holders gain automatic entry by placing their Campus Card on the ‘proximity reader’ beside the right-hand door.

Restrictions for visitors

6 April—14 June Members of the public without cards are only admitted on weekends, by prior appointment.

Regrettably, they may not use study spaces here as these are required by our own students revising for exams. Visitors are encouraged to look to their own school, college or public library for study space.

As always, our policy is that children in the Library must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

The Library Café will remain accessible throughout, but we apologise to visitors unable to use Café Libro during restricted periods.

UoR campus card faulty?

Should your University Campus Card fail to open our doors with the card reader, please ask Campus Card Services to fix the fault via their Campus Card non-residential door access report form or email cardfinance@reading.ac.uk.

Alternative study space during Library refurb

Whilst refurbishment works continue in the Library building this summer there will be some construction noise. Besides the quieter Library@URS building, UoR students can also use additional study space listed on the Library Refurbishment Project page.

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian for
Sue Egleton, Associate Director (Systems & User Services)

What have you watched? Kanopy in 2018/19

This term the Library purchased access to the Kanopy Video Streaming service – it’s a huge collection of online videos including documentaries, films, and instructional videos. You can watch Kanopy videos online, on- and off-campus, and they’re all accessible through the Library here: https://www.reading.ac.uk/library/eresources/image-sound/lib-kanopy.aspx

What have you been watching?

Since the start of Spring Term, 874 of you have watched a total of 247 hours of content – mostly on Sunday or Monday nights… we won’t ask why!

Most Popular Films

These are the top 5 films that you’ve been watching, and their summary from Kanopy.

  1. Tongues Untied
    Marlon Riggs’ essay film TONGUES UNTIED gives voice to communities of black gay men, presenting their cultures and perspectives on the world as they confront racism, homophobia, and marginalization.
  2. L’avventura
    An iconic piece of challenging 1960’s cinema and a gripping narrative on its own terms, L’AVVENTURA concerns the enigmatic disappearance of a young woman during a yachting trip off the coast of Sicily.
  3. Stars
    Stationed in a secluded Bulgarian village in 1943, Walter, an artist and sergeant in the Wehrmacht, lives an almost idyllic life far away from the war. Then one day a transit camp is set up for Jews arriving from Greece.
  4. Definite Articles and Nouns
    Learn the gender of Spanish nouns by practicing each new noun with its masculine or feminine definite article.
  5. Type Hunters
    This film plunges us into the “typographic cauldron” of the great modern metropolis.

What else will you discover?

There’s a wide range of films available, as you can see from the list above. Take a look for yourself! You can browse by subject or topic, or search for a filmmaker or subject area to see what Kanopy has to offer.

Kim Coles, Liaison Team Manager

Contactless borrowing with Self-Service Points

Campus Card reader

Simply tapping your Campus Card here will give you access to your Library account!

Soon you will no longer need to scan the barcode of your Campus Card to borrow items at our new Self-Service Points in the University Library.

Simply holding your Campus Card up to the mifare chip reader beneath the screen will allow you to borrow items and check the status of your account as normal.

Course Collection machines?

Please note that the Self-Service Points in Course Collection will still require you to scan your Campus Card to be able to borrow items.

When?

Our new Self-Service Points will be updated in the week commencing 1 April.

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services

Language for Resilience exhibition comes to UoR Library

Bronze reflective light fittings above flimsy poster on frame

The British Council’s Language for Resilience exhibitionruns until 29 March at Reading.

In partnership with the University, the British Council has brought the Language for Resilience exhibition to Reading. Running until 29 March, this free and public exhibition is hosted in the University Library building’s new exhibition space on its ground floor, created as part of the Library Refurbishment Project.

Based on research by the University’s Dr Tony Capstick and in collaboration with international institutions across the Middle East, Africa, EU and Americas, this interactive exhibition demonstrates the ways language is used to build resilience among the millions of people that have been displaced from their homes by conflict and civil unrest.

Language learning is imperative to helping refugees and communities overcome miscommunications and social barriers. This exhibition is a valuable opportunity to understand the challenges associated with building resilience, and gives a voice to the young people and adults who deserve to have their stories heard.

Exhibiton posters on frames and boxes containing masks and shoes

The Language for Resilience exhibition celebrates items used in teaching languages as well as people involved.

Refugees displaced by conflict often find themselves far from home, without essential language skills for even basic communication, which hinders the education and career opportunities for both themselves and their children. The exhibition aims to break down barriers by protecting the use of refugee’s home languages and allowing refugee communities to integrate with their host communities so they can feel valued within their new society. Building language resilience will reduce isolation and play a huge role in helping create a safe space for refugees to address the trauma caused by their displacement.

As it stands, only 1 to 5 percent of young refugees are currently enrolled in a university programme in their host countries. Improving language skills will allow more refugees to access the information required to progress in the education system and start to rebuild their lives.

For more information please visit the project Language for Resilience website. To learn more about language and migration research at the University of Reading, please visit the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator with Tim Yates, Marketing Communications and Engagement Team

Planning your revision – info tip

Boy reading in sunshineEaster’s coming up fast, and you’re probably still completing assignments for the end of term. Exams might still seem a long way off now but they’ll be here before you know it. It’s a good time to start thinking about your revision – and the Library and Study Advice are here to help.

Working out a schedule

It’s important to have a plan, to make sure you have time to cover all the topics you need to. Avoid making your revision plan too detailed and prescriptive though – you will need to build in time for relaxation, exercise – and the unexpected!

The Study Advice guide on preparing for exams includes tips for planning your revision, including how to work out your revision schedule. You might also find our video tutorials on time management helpful – we have tips on planning and avoiding procrastination, for instance.

Finding materials for revision

You will probably start by reading through your lecture notes, and then looking at texts on your reading list. The Library has guidance on finding different types of publication as well as videos that will help you to get the most out of the Library.

You should also check the subject resources and guidance for information resources in your topic – much more reliable than ‘just Googling it’. And remember that, whether you’re revising on or off campus, our ebooks and ejournals are accessible 24/7.

Where will you revise?

It’s good to think about the place that you study best. Some students prefer to study at home or in Halls, and 24/7 access to e-resources makes this a viable option without taking mountains of books home. If you do this, make sure you make a schedule and stick to it – it’s easy to watch just one more episode of that box set!

Many students prefer to study in the Library, and study spaces will be available in the URS Building and the Library as usual. However it’s worth considering some of the other places to study on campus; being somewhere different may help you to avoid distractions. Or consider other places off-campus like public libraries. Going to a new place that you’ve identified as a ‘place to do revision’ can help you to focus.

Wherever you revise, remember to take breaks. Library@URS may be open 24 hours but that doesn’t mean you have to work through the night – your brain needs rest and time for processing information.

Making your revision effective

If you can find six minutes in your busy schedule, you have enough time to watch the Study Advice video tutorial on effective revision – and save yourself a lot of wasted time. Our guide on preparing for exams also has tips on revision and memory techniques. If you’re taking exams in the UK for the first time, have a look at our information on assessment by examination in UK higher education to give you a clearer idea of how they may differ from what you have done in the past.

Remember that the purpose of revision is not to memorise everything you can find about the subject, but to prepare yourself to answer exam questions. Check the Past Paper archive on the Exams Office website to find examples of questions for your modules which you can use to write practice answers – to time and by hand, ideally. We have a Study Seminar on Writing for University Exams on Wed 20 March 2019, 2-3pm in Edith Morley G25 – no need to book. And have a look at our video tutorials on exams for guidance on the best way to prepare for different kinds of exams.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Kim Shahabudin, Michelle Reid, Sonia Hood and Linda Shroeder (Study Advice team).

Referencing workshops for Undergraduate and Masters students

Open book on a laptopThere are spaces still available on our upcoming EndNote Online and Mendeley workshops for undergraduates and masters students.

Come along to these beginners workshops to learn how to …

  • store details of the books and articles you read
  • download references from databases such as the Web of Science
  • insert citations in your Word documents
  • build a bibliography in a style of your choosing at the click of a button

Workshop times

  • Wednesday 13 March, 14:00 – 15:30 (EndNote Online)
  • Wednesday 21 March, 14.00-15.00 (Mendeley)

Book your place

Book your place via the ‘Library course bookings’ link on the RISISweb portal. The bookings link is located in the ‘Actions’ tab.

These workshops are part of the Student Training and Experience Programme (STEP) and count towards the RED Award.

Unable to make this date?

If you can’t make either of these sessions but would like to know more, take a look at our reference management guide or contact your Liaison Librarian.

Sally Smith, Learning Support Co-ordinator

Cite it right – and avoid unintentional plagiarism! – info tip

You may think that advice on avoiding plagiarism doesn’t apply to you, because you’re not planning to buy an essay from the internet, or copy someone else’s work. But you may not be aware that it is possible to plagiarise unintentionally if:

  • you’re not aware of the differences between referencing at university and any referencing you may have been used to doing previously;
  • you haven’t been meticulous about keeping records of your reading;
  • you don’t know how to use references in your academic writing to support your discussion and critical analysis.

It’s important to take referencing seriously and not just guess, or assume that you know how to do it. The consequences can be serious with marks deducted – it can even lead to accusations of academic misconduct.

However, it can be confusing when you have advice and guidance on referencing from so many different sources. It’s tempting to just Google it! But that’s far less likely to give you the right answer than guidance produced at your own university. You should always check your own Course Handbook first for advice (it will be on Blackboard).

Our Citing References guide combines previous guidance from the Library and Study Advice to cover the why, what, when and how of referencing in a single place. Study Advice video tutorials on referencing are embedded in the guide, which includes:

You could also look at The Academic Integrity Toolkit, which shows how understanding referencing is an important part of studying at university and ‘becoming a graduate’ generally. The Toolkit includes tips, explanations and exercises (with answers) to help you develop your understanding of essential skills including:

If you’re a Part 1 undergraduate and have enrolled on Study Smart, you could also go back over the relevant guidance in Week 1.

The guidance below focuses on three important points to help you avoid unintentional plagiarism.

References in a footnote1.Know when to include a reference

Whenever you include an idea that you have gained from your reading in an assignment, you must ensure that you reference it correctly, both in the text and at the end in your reference list or bibliography. If you use the original words you have found in your reading, you must mark them with quotation marks, even if you only use part of the sentence. It is not enough to give the details of where the words came from; they must be marked out, or it will look as if you are claiming them as your own words. If you are writing the idea up in your own words, don’t be tempted to just change a few words. If you use quotations inadequately or paraphrase badly it will certainly be viewed as poor academic practice and may subject your work to penalties. It may even be seen as plagiarism.

Watch this brief video tutorial on using paraphrases.

See Library and Study Advice guidance on using quotes and paraphrases.

2. Develop good note-taking practices

Ever looked at your notes and thought, “I wonder where that came from?” or “I wonder if those are my words or copied from the text?” It’s frustrating when you can’t be sure – but it could cause you problems if you use the material without being able to reference it accurately. To avoid this, make it a habit to have good record-keeping practices. Always note the details of each text you use (author, title, year) when you start writing notes on your reading; include page numbers as you go along, even if you are not copying text directly but writing the ideas in your own words; have a system of markers to indicate if something is a quote (put in quotation marks), an idea explained in your own words, or a query or new idea stemming from what you’re read (perhaps an asterisk *). The Study Advisers have guidance on effective note-taking and a brief video tutorial on critical note-taking with more suggestions.

If you’re using an e-book, you may be able to make notes electronically as you’re reading the text. See the section in our LibGuide on Studying with e-books for more information. If you have an online reading list, you can also make brief notes on this – our LibGuide page on What else can I do with my list? has details.

You might also consider using reference management software to keep details of your reading including all the bibliographic information. EndNote online and Mendeley are free software which work with Word to create citations and bibliographies for you.  If you’re a researcher with lots of references to manage you might choose the more sophisticated Desktop EndNote. For advice on which version to use, and for self-paced training guides on EndNote, or book a place on a training workshop, see the Library’s web pages.

3. Know what to do if you can’t find all the details of a reference

bibliographic details screencast screencapIf you have a quote but don’t know where it came from, try typing it into Google. You may find it’s better to use a short phrase rather than the whole quote; try to find a grouping of words that is less common. If you have some details of the text, you could try looking at your reading list or searching the Library catalogue. You can also look back through your Library account to see the titles of books you’ve borrowed. If you have the author and title of a journal article or even just the title of the journal and a date it may be possible to find the complete reference in Summon or one of the Library’s databases. What you must never do is invent details, or include things in your assignment if you cannot be sure about the source. This may lead to accusations of academic misconduct.

For more help watch this brief video tutorial on how to find bibliographic details.

Need more help?

If you’re still confused, or you have a specific question about referencing that isn’t answered in our guide, you can always contact your Liaison Librarian or the Study Advice team to discuss this in person. Just remember to do it in plenty of time – the day your assignment is due to be submitted is not ideal!

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Dr Kim Shahabudin, Study Adviser and Caitlin McCulloch, Trainee Liaison Librarian.