Citing references made easy with EndNote Web – info tip

Books, glasses and laptopAre you starting your dissertation? Do you lack confidence citing references in your work? Have you been marked down for inconsistencies in your bibliography?

EndNote Web can help!

What is EndNote Web?

EndNote Web is an online service you can use to:

  • store and organise useful references you find whilst researching topics
  • insert references in your Word document
  • automatically build and format your bibliography in a style of your choosing

It is designed for use by undergraduates and Masters students as it is a cut-down version of the Desktop EndNote program used by researchers (which is available on all PCs on campus).

How do I use it?

EndNote Web is freely available, but University members can access an enhanced version as part of the Library’s subscription to the Web of Science database. It can be used on a PC or a Mac.

Just log in to the Web of Science and sign up for an account. Once registered you can use it both on- and off-campus.

How do I get references into my EndNote Web library?

You can type in details of useful books and articles you have found. However, the quickest and most accurate methods are to export references from Library databases or use the Online search facility from within EndNote Web.

Direct export

This method is available on the Web of Science and all of the Ebsco databases (including Business Source Complete). Just search the database for your topic and save/export to EndNote Web.

Import

For many other databases it is easy to save a file of references and then Import them into EndNote Web. For more information on the method you will need to use for your favourite database take a look at our page about the database, this will include details of the Import option you need to select as part of the process. If you need advice, contact your subject liaison librarian.

Online search

The Online search facility within EndNote Web is particularly useful for searching library catalogues, and you can use it to get book references from our catalogue into your library.

Writing your essay or dissertation

Once you have references in your EndNote Web library you can insert them into your Word document as you write your essay or dissertation. Just download the Cite While You Write toolbar and use it in Word to search your library for the reference you want to insert and it will automatically put the citation in the text and build the bibliography at the end of your document.

EndNote Web Cite While You Write toolbar

You can select from a number of referencing styles (such as Numbered, APA, MHRA) or use the customised Harvard style which matches the style required by many of the science and life science departments here at Reading. Once you select a style, all of your citations and references will be reformatted automatically.

Getting help

Take a look at our Guide to getting starting with EndNote Web (PDF) will take you through all the steps involved in creating your EndNote Web account, getting references into your library and using it with Word to write your essays or dissertation. Or View videos on using EndNote Web produced by Thomson Reuters (suppliers of EndNote Web).

Alternatively, contact your subject liaison librarian for individual help and support.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding information

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager and Liaison Librarian (English Language and Applied Linguistics & Food and Nutritional Sciences).

Using University Special Collections for your dissertation – info tip

Are you planning your dissertation? You might want to consider using the University’s Special Collections of archives, manuscripts and rare books.

Why use Special Collections?

Rare book spinesOur collections include rare books, manuscripts, records, letters, photographs, maps and drawings. Using this type of material can add a unique dimension to your work and enliven your dissertation. You could, for example, encounter the annotations of previous readers in a book and discover what they thought of a text, get a glimpse of the inner workings of a farm or a publishing company by looking at their records, or find out how new discoveries in your discipline were communicated and disseminated at the time.  You are also much more likely to produce original research, which will help you gain you a better mark, and you will develop valuable research and critical thinking skills.

Walking into Special Collections can sometimes seem daunting – but it doesn’t have to be! We’re helpful folk down here, and we’re always happy to get you started. The University’s Special Collections are available for all students in the University, and you can access over 150 important collections covering a wide range of arts and humanities, science and social science discipline areas.

In the past, students have used Special Collections to research a wide range of subjects, including:

  • A collection of historical postcardsMills & Boon romantic fiction
  • Botanical illustration
  • Robinson Crusoe
  • The publishing industry
  • Mathematics
  • Bees
  • Farming records
  • Women’s history
  • Children’s literature
  • Architectural history

Finding items on your research topic

You may be surprised at the variety of material you can access to support your research! See the A-Z list of collections or our list of featured items for a flavour of what’s available.

Try the following to see if there is useful material for your research project:

Using Special Collections

A Wizard of Oz illustrationItems from our collections cannot be borrowed, but they can be consulted in our reading room. You’re advised to plan ahead and contact Special Collections prior to your visit, so that we can have the material ready for you for when you arrive. We are based on the London Road campus, in the same building as the Museum of English Rural Life.

Go to the Special Collections website for more useful information on using the service.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Erika Delbecque & Claire Wooldridge, UMASCS Librarians.

Getting help with your dissertation – info tip

A pen on a notebook next to a laptopNo matter how many essays you’ve written, working on a dissertation or research project can be overwhelming. They can involve lots of new skills from deciding on research questions through to those tricky final citations.

Whatever stage you are at there is lots of help available from the Library and Study Advice team!

Starting out: Search strategies and finding information

It can be a little daunting starting such a big project so you might want to start with the Study Advice guide on Dissertations and major projects or their video on defining your research question.

Once you have sorted your research questions you will need to start researching your topic. Look at the Library subject guide for your department to find key databases in your area. There is also a guide to doing a literature search, the LibLearn tutorials on Blackboard, or you could watch our videos on literature searching if you would like a break from reading!

If you are struggling to find the information that you need then you can contact the Liaison Librarian for your subject.

railroad tracksStaying on track

Once you have started your research the Study Advice team have some resources to help you keep going. If you are trying to tackle the literature you have found it might be a good idea to watch their videos on reading academic texts and critical notetaking.

With large projects like dissertations it is easy to feel like you have lots of time left only to find the deadline creeping up on you. When you are trying to balance your dissertation with lectures, other coursework and revision it is easy to fall behind so take a look at the Study Advice video on managing your time to get some tips.

Dissertations and research projects can also be harder to structure than a normal essay due to their size, this Study Advice video on structuring your dissertation has some helpful suggestions to get you started.

Writing up and referencing

Woman using MacBook

From wocintechchat.com

When you have a structure in place you will be ready to start writing up, if this seems a little overwhelming take a look at the Study Advice guidance on writing up your dissertation.

As it is a longer piece of writing than you are likely to have written before it is a good idea not to leave your referencing until the last minute, you do not want to lose precious marks because you ran out of time to format your bibliography! Luckily there is a way you can speed this process up; EndNote Web is a reference manager which can store details of what you have read, insert references into Word and automatically format your bibliography. There is a detailed guide on the Library website to get you started.

If you choose to insert your citations manually, and are not sure how to reference a particular resource or would like a refresher, there is lots of guidance on the Citing References guide. But don’t forget to check your student handbook for details of the referencing style required by your department.

Further Help

If you would like more information you can contact your Liaison Librarian or the Study Advice team.

Good luck with your research!

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Liaison Librarian English Language and Applied Linguistics & Food and Nutritional Sciences

My account is back!

Laptop, tablet and mobile on a deskWe’re pleased to let you know that the problem with logging in to Library accounts has been fixed. You should be able to access your account, renew your loans, pay fines and place holds as normal. However, there are ongoing IT issues on campus which means that this service might still be at risk of disruption.

Apologies for any inconvenience this has caused. If you experience any problems accessing your Library account please email library@reading.ac.uk.

Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager

Referencing headaches? Online tools can help – info tip

Laptop, book and glassesDo you struggle with referencing? Have you been marked down for incomplete or inconsistent references? There are some online tools that can help!

Why use online referencing tools?

  1. You can use them to store accurate details of publications to use in your assignments.
  2. They can save you time compiling, checking and correcting references – just insert the citation and a bibliography is created automatically. You can also reformat your citations in a different style at the click of a button.
  3. You can add notes to your references, to remind yourself of specific parts you might want to use.
  4. Some allow you to store PDFs of the sources with your references, so that everything is together and in most cases available on any computer.

If you use an online tool you still need to know when to include a citation, and understand the principles of referencing. You can find help on this in the referencing guide or from the referencing video tutorials. You also need to be aware of which style your department requires you to use – consult your course handbook for details.

Which one should I use?

If you are an undergraduate or masters student…

… we would recommend using EndNote Web. This online resource can be used on any computer and is free to use.

You can get accurate reference details into it by: using the Online Search facility with the Library catalogue; the export option from Web of Science or EBSCO resources; or by importing records from Summon and other databases.

Once the EndNote toolbar is installed in Word, you can insert citations from EndNote Web into your assignments and it will automatically build the bibliography at the end. Select from a list of common referencing styles (including the University’s own ‘Harvard for Reading’ style) to format your bibliography.

EndNote Web is fully supported by the Library, so if you need 1-1 help, there will be someone here who can help.

To get started, come along to a workshop, try our step-by-step guide to using EndNote Web, or watch an introductory video.

If you are a research postgraduate or member of staff…

… we recommend using Desktop EndNote. This can be installed free of charge on any University-owned computer, and is already available on most campus PCs. A personal copy can be purchased at the discounted price of around £75.

References can be easily captured from many databases, and you can use the ‘Find full-text’ feature to automatically attach article PDFs to those references. A very large number of referencing styles are provided, including those for specific journals. You can also download other ones from the EndNote website, or create your own by editing existing styles. It is also possible to share your EndNote library by synchronising with an EndNote Web account – useful for collaboration.

Find out more by coming along to a workshop, trying our step-by-step guides, or watching a brief introductory video.

Other options

There are a number of other referencing tools available, including Mendeley, Zotero and Word’s own referencing facility. Although we do not provide support for these, we have provided links to online guidance and videos via our Managing references guide.

Help

If you need help with using EndNote, or with any aspect of citing references, contact your subject liaison librarian who will be happy to help.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager & Liaison Librarian

Goodbye ‘old-style’ Athens access

Eduserv, the company who provide the Athens service, are decommissioning this access route on the 31 October 2016. They will no longer be providing this service for any institution. Those with long memories might remember the news three years ago regarding the move from old-style Athens to Institutional login for accessing e-resources. Since then we’ve continued to work on ensuring your access and authentication to our resources is as simple and seamless as possible, and with IT have enabled access for the majority of them via the Single Sign On (SSO) page.

Almost all of you will be used to going via the SSO page, so the news that the old-style Athens login is finally being removed should have no impact at all. However we are aware there are a few people still logging in via the old Athens sign-in page:

Athens login screen

You might have reached this page either because you have an old bookmark for a resource, or because you have found the University of Reading listed under ‘Login via Athens’ options on resource websites. After 31 October you will no longer find us listed here, we will only be listed via the Institutional login options, often shown on the same pages.

You may need to update your links

If any of your favourites or bookmarks for resources take you to the page above, you will need to replace them with up-to-date links that direct you to login via the SSO page. To find an up-to-date link:

  • Go to our Databases A-Z list.
  • Locate your resource and click on the link for it.
  • On the next page, click on the off-campus link to the resource. This should take you via the SSO page.
  • Enter your University username and password and click on log in.
  • You should now be in the resource and you can favourite or bookmark this page.
  • The next time you use your new favourite link it will automatically route you to the SSO page so you can login.

Alternatively, if you are trying to access a specific book or journal, just follow the links from the Enterprise catalogue.

Need help?

If you have any problems accessing a specific resource please fill in our e-resources problem report form and a member of the E-resources Team will investigate your issue.

Jackie Skinner, on behalf of Sue Egleton, Head of Systems & User Services

The Library website – your gateway to information – info tip

Spider's webThe Library website contains a wealth of help and information to support your studies.

Where to find what…

Use the menu on the left of every page to explore the site.

  • Using the Library – information on facilities and services, including borrowing, opening hours, floor plans and photocopying
  • Finding information – help and guidance on finding information, including details of resources in your subject
  • E-resources – links to e-journals, e-books and databases, and information about accessing them
  • Contacts & support – people, sites and services
  • About us – policies, facts and figures
  • Libraries beyond UoR – using other libraries or getting items via inter-library loan

Up front

Library homepageThe things you want most frequently are on our homepage.

  • Enterprise catalogue search box – most people come to the Library website to search the catalogue, so it takes centre stage
  • Summon search box – our new discovery service allows you to find online journal articles and book chapters on a topic
  • Opening hours – this week’s opening hours are on the homepage, enabling you to check them quickly and easily
  • Subject resources – jump straight to our subject guides to find the most relevant resources and information for you
  • E-resources – quick links to our databases, e-books and e-journals; all available 24-7
  • Library news – keep up-to-date with the latest Library news (or follow us on Twitter or Facebook)

Scroll to the bottom of our homepage for more useful links, including guidance for specific groups of Library users, and links to related services.

Enterprise – more than just books…

Enterprise is the Library catalogue. Use it to find items in the Library including books, journals, DVDs, theses etc. You can also search Enterprise to find our e-journals and e-books – so you don’t even need to set foot in the Library to make use of our resources! Just search for a book or journal as you usually would and you may find a record that links you to the online version.

You can also use Enterprise to check your account to find out when your books are due and to renew your loans. Just login with your University username and password.

Enterprise also covers many of the collections held across the University, including those at the Museum of English Rural Life and the Special Collections Service (archives and rare books) – a one-stop-shop to find out about the wealth of materials you could use for your dissertation.

To find out more about Enterprise, and tips on using it, go to our Help using Enterprise.

Summon online materials for your studies

Search results on SummonThe Summon discovery service to enables you to easily find full-text articles and book chapters on any subject.

Everything you find should be available to read as the results are limited to articles and chapters covered by the Library’s subscriptions.

You will also find definitions from reliable encyclopedias and dictionaries related to your topic. Other materials covered include newspaper articles, standards, conference proceedings, government documents, trade publications and book reviews.

To find out more about Summon, and tips on searching it, go to our Help using Summon.

Hidden depths

Some pages you might not have discovered…

  • Jargon buster What does ‘folio’ mean? I need to use an ‘Institutional login’ – what is it? What is a ‘hold’? Answers to these and more in our Jargon buster
  • How to… – quick links to answers to our most frequently asked questions
  • Wikipedia alternatives – online dictionaries and encyclopedias you can rely on

Can’t find what you are looking for?

  • Site search – use the search box at the very top of the screen, or to limit your search to pages on the Library site use the ‘Site search’ Useful link at the bottom of the page
  • Site index – this ‘Useful link’ gives an alphabetical list of what’s on the website

Any comments?

If you have any comments about the Library website, or suggestions for improvement, just fill in the Website comments form or contact the Library Web Manager Jackie Skinner.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding information

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, the Library Web Manager.

New architecture resource – try it now!

Eiffel towerTry out Art and Architecture Complete and let us know what you think.

This database for the study of art and architecture provides easy access to academic journals, magazines, trade publications and books. It includes full-text coverage for hundreds of journals with some dating back to 1937.

The trial is available both on- and off-campus and will last until 25 November.

Let us know what you think!

Please send your comments on this resource to the Architecture Liaison Librarian, Helen Hathaway. Email: h.m.hathaway@reading.ac.uk.

Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager

New student? Make the most of your Library – info tip

studentsongroundfloorWelcome!

We are here to support your studies, providing you with access to information – online, multimedia or printed – and the skills to make the most of it.

For a general intro…

Learning how to use the Library

A large academic library can be confusing and hard to find your way around.

Come to a workshop

Like a tour but better! Our interactive workshops run throughout Welcome Week and Week 1. Find out how to search the catalogue, find books in the Library and borrow them. Each workshop lasts around 50 minutes, but could save you a lot more time in the long run!

To find out more and book your place see – Finding your way workshops.

student using e-resourcesExplore your Library in Welcome Week

We are open through Welcome Week, so why not explore before all the other students return?! Between 09:00 and 17:00 you can:

  • Collect a self-guided Library tour leaflet to follow – stop off at whatever is relevant to you.
  • Visit ‘your’ subject floor to find resources for your subject – pick up a guide to your subject there; discover your favourite study areas (we’ve silent, quiet and group spaces); and pick-up a freebie from one of our information suppliers.
  • Tweet a Library selfie to @UniRdg_Library with the hashtag #UoRLib to tell us what you think. The best three will win a goodie bag prize.
  • Meet Study Advice and Maths Support on the 1st Floor – pick up a free planner to organise your new university life!

Visit us in the Marquee

On Tuesday 20 September, Library staff and the Study Advice Team will be in the Marquee for academic sucess and module selection day. Please pop in and have a chat with us about how we can support your studies.

Explore our online help

We’ve got lots of resources on our website to support your studies and develop your skills.

  • Try one of our LibLearn Tutorials to find out how to use the Library, search the catalogue, and more. Available 24/7 on Blackboard, the University’s online learning system.
  • Watch our videos – these cover a variety of topics ranging from placing holds on books, to doing your literature search.
  • Take a look at your subject guide, to discover key resources relevant to your studies.
  • Develop your study skills by exploring the wide range of guides and videos provided by our in-house Study Advice Team.

Our friendly subject liaison librariansGet individual help

Your friendly subject liaison librarian will be happy to give you individual help with any subject-related enquiries, or questions about the Library. You might also see yours as part of a Library session organised by your Department.

For 1-1 help with study skills contact the Study Advice Team.

For more information…

For extra guidance see Information for new Library users on our website.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Learning Support Co-ordinator Sally Smith and Library Web Manager Jackie Skinner.

Summon – new and improved!

Our Summon Discovery Service has been upgraded, resulting in an improved interface and some new features. Summon allows you to search across the Library’s online collections of journal articles, book chapters, and other publication types. Search it via the Summon search box on the Library homepage.

Summon search results

Results display

  • To see a summary of each item click on the ‘Preview’ link. This will display the abstract, subject keywords and other details of the item in the body of your results, instead of in the right-hand panel.
  • You can cite, email or export details of individual items. This is in addition to being able to add items to your ‘Saved items’ folder to cite, email or export details for multiple references.
  • Definitions from reliable sources, such as Encyclopaedia Britannica, will appear in the right-hand pane. Along with suggested searches you might wish to try.
  • Displays of citation counts from the Web of Science/Scopus and social media interaction indicators from Altmetric have been improved. Use these to help you judge the impact of an item.

Refine options improved

  • It is now possible to exclude items using the refine options on the left of the screen. Just hover over one of the refine options and click on the red cross that appears. This will exclude items in that category from your results. This is in addition to being able to click on an option, to just look at items in that category.
  • Publication date limits have also been improved. Some pre-set options are available, enabling you to easily limit your results to items published in the last 12 months, 3 years, or 5 years. Alernatively, you can use the date slider to select your own custom date range.

Feedback

We hope you find these new features useful. If you have any comments about Summon, please contact Jackie Skinner.

Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager