Library open for study space and Click & Collect

Open sign in rainbow colours

The Library is open – stay safe!

During the new national lockdown the Library is open every day for bookable study space and to collect print materials via our Click & Collect service.

The Library will be open for study space; Monday – Thursday, 08:30 – 19:00 and Friday – Sunday, 08:30 – 17:00

Click & Collect is open; Monday – Thursday, 10:00 – 19:00 and Friday – Sunday, 10:00 – 17:00.

For more information about how the library is operating during the pandemic, please look at our Current Library Services guide

 

Natalie Guest, Document Delivery Co-ordinator / Academic Liaison Librarian

Study space bookings – changes for 2021

Through feedback from Library users and observation we have noticed that it’s sometimes unclear for users where they should sit and that spaces are booked but not occupied. So in order to improve your experience when visiting the Library to study and ensure that we can continue to operate in a Covid safe way we’re making some changes to our study space booking system and allocating a numbered space to each booking and sending you a reminder the day before. During the Autumn term we’d already started checking your bookings on our system when you arrive at the Welcome Desk to keep study areas from becoming over-populated. It’s important that we have plenty of space for you to effectively social distance in the building, and to guarantee only people who have a genuine booking gain entry.

CLose up picture of a desk showing a label with number

Sit at the desk labelled with the number and area in your booking confirmation email

From 4 January 2021 all study spaces in the Library will have a number. When you book a Study space you’ll be allocated a specific desk to sit at – yours for the duration of your booking. The desk number and area will be on the booking confirmation email you receive. Desk areas are indicated by signage in the building and desk numbers by a label on each space.

You’ll receive a reminder email the day before your booking, if you don’t need the space any more the email will contain details on how to cancel it to make it available for another user. The same option is available in the original booking confirmation email too.

To book and use a study space please follow these steps

  • Book your space online – please only book for yourself, all our study spaces are for individual study as per government guidance.
  • Bring your Campus Card and booking confirmation email to the Library, and please wear a face covering unless exempt
  • Check your study space area and seat number – ask us if you are unsure where it is
  • Sanitise your space with the supplies provided
  • Once seated you can remove your face covering, but please use it whenever you’re moving around inside the building
  • Please vacate your space on time – someone else will be arriving to use it after you

Not received your confirmation email? Don’t book again! Please contact us and we can check your booking is there and re-send the confirmation email. If the space you booked is unavailable, please ask us for help either in person at the Welcome Desk on the Ground Floor or call us on 0118 378 8770.

We want the Library to continue to be a welcoming and safe space for you to study – please continue to help us by following our study space etiquette guidance. We know space is limited but with your help all Library members can have a fair chance to use our facilities.

Sue Egleton, Associate Director (Systems and User Services)

Off-site Store collection cancelled this week

We are unable to fetch items from our Off-site Store this week due to staffing issues so with regret there will be no collection on Thursday 22 October.

We hope to resume Off-site Store collections next week, so any items Shelves with boxes of documentsrequested will be fetched on Thursday 29 October. If you have requested an item you will receive an email when it is available to collect.

 

Natalie Guest
Document Delivery Coordinator / Academic Liaison Librarian

Remember your Campus Card

Remember your Campus Card – you need it every time you visit the Library to enter through our new entrance gates.

Library user tapping campus card to enter library through security gates

Tap your Campus Card to enter and exit the Library

The gates are to increase your security and prioritise study space for University members.

Library members: you can enter and exit just by tapping your Campus Card (the same one you use to borrow) at the gates …. so there’s nothing you need to do other than carry it with you. If you forget your card, speak to staff at the Welcome Desk who can grant you temporary access on a limited number of occasions.

Members of the public over 18You are welcome to use and copy Library printed materials Monday to Friday, 09:00-17:00. Please bring phographic proof of ID with you when you visit and speak to staff at the Welcome Desk who will ask for your ID, gather some information about you, and ask you to abide by the Library rules. You need to book ahead to gain access evenings and weekends. Please email library@reading.ac.uk telling us when you want to visit and we will arrange for Security staff to give you entrance: if you have not contacted the Library beforehand you will not be admitted.

Everyone can still use the Library Café and Ground Floor toilets, which you will find before you reach the barriers.

Natalie Guest, Document Delivery Co-ordinator / Academic Liaison Librarian

New subscription to IEEE Xplore

We have a new subscription to IEEE Xplore, a collection of more than four-million articles from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (and partners,) in electrical engineering, computer science, and electronics.

In November 2017 the Library undertook the difficult decision to cancel our subscription to IEEE Xplore. Since the subscription ceased we have been involved in constructive discussions with the publisher and their representatives, and we are pleased to report that we have now reached an agreement, which will see access to IEEE Xplore restored from February 2018.

We understand that this has caused considerable disruption for academic staff and students in some subject areas, so we would like to thank everyone for their patience while negotiations were taking place.

We are currently updating Enterprise, the library catalogue, Summon and the E-Journals Finder to show IEEE Xplore content, but access is available immediately via the IEEE Xplore database

Paul Johnson
Associate Director – Collections, Research and Space

IEEE Xplore subscription ending

Open laptop with notepadThe Library has recently taken the difficult decision to cancel our subscription to IEEE Xplore. Since April 2017 we have been in discussions with IEEE and their UK agents over a new 3-year deal for IEEE Xplore Digital Library. In spite of the fact that the University no longer has a School of Systems Engineering, and usage of the resource has been reducing for several years, the proposed pricing from IEEE was unacceptable, and indeed represented an increase on what we had previously paid. There is no transparent pricing system for this resource, and no significant reductions in price were offered. We would have liked to continue the subscription, but unfortunately had reached a point where a resource represents such poor value for money that cancelling it becomes necessary.

We understand that this may cause some difficulties for staff and students, however we will be taking out a number of individual subscriptions to key IEEE journals, which will be hosted on the IEEE Xplore Digital Library platform. These will be available from 1st January 2018, when the subscription year starts.

If you would like any more information, including help on locating specific articles via alternative routes (such as Open Access copies or inter-library loan), please contact your Liaison Librarian

Paul Johnson
Associate Director (Collections Research & Space)

Book EndNote Web training for easy referencing!

Student studyingThere are spaces still available on next week’s EndNote Web workshop for undergraduates and masters students.

Come along to learn how to use EndNote Web to…

  • store details of the books and articles you read
  • download references from databases such as the Web of Science
  • insert citations in your Word documents
  • build a bibliography in a style of your choosing at the click of a button

Workshop time

Wednesday 25 October, 14:00 – 15:30

Book your place

Book your place via the ‘Library course bookings’ link on the RISISweb portal. The bookings link is located in the ‘Actions’ tab if you’re a student. If you’re a member of staff click on ‘Specialist Actions’ in the ‘Specialist Actions’ tab.

This workshop is part of the Student Training and Experience Programme (STEP) and counts towards the RED Award.

Unable to make this date?

Check the EndNote training webpage for other dates when this workshop is running this term.

Sally Smith, Learning Support Co-ordinator

Making the most of our map resources – info tip

Field mapsDid you know that University of Reading Library has more than 70,000 maps and atlases and is one of the largest university collections in the country? Our maps can be used for your teaching, research, and holidays!

Geographical cover

We have excellent coverage of Britain, including detailed coverage of Berkshire and the Reading area. Coverage of Europe is also very good, at least to road map level of most countries.

Coverage of the rest of the world varies with what is available – it may not be possible to obtain recent maps of some areas, especially as many governments consider maps to be politically sensitive. However we will certainly have something for all parts of the globe.

Date range

Reading 1761Although the collection is mostly post-1900, we have many facsimiles of earlier maps, including reproductions of English 18th century county atlases.

We also have Ordnance Survey maps dating back to 1830, as well as access to Historic Digimap, so it is possible to produce a time sequence of maps of a particular place.

Older versions of atlases and maps may reveal hidden information about a place and its past.

Types of map

You need to consider the type of map you need, and what you are planning to do with it.  Maps come in a variety of different types:

  •     Sheet maps or atlases
  •     Flat or folded
  •     Loanable or reference
  •     General purpose or thematic
  •     Paper or digital

Atlases are generally available for loan, and are mostly found in the 912 and FOLIO–912 sequences on the 2nd Floor.

Most of the map collection is non-loan, but a set of folded ‘Field maps’, including British Landranger and geology maps, are available for loan on the 2nd Floor.

Thematic maps show geology, soil types, land use, population, languages – anything which can be shown with a spatial distribution.  Many maps of this type are included in atlases, but may also be found as sheet maps.

Digital maps

roam TowerDigital maps are of increasing importance. For Great Britain, Digimap delivers maps and map data from official sources to UK higher education, and you can easily create authoritative location and site maps.  There are five different collections available to members of the University of Reading:

  • Digimap – contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and data, ranging from small scale base maps to detailed large scale plans
  • Historic Digimap – historic Ordnance Survey maps from 1840 to the 1990s.  They can be compared side-by-side to help follow changes in the landscape
  • Geology Digimap – geology maps and data from the British Geological Survey (BGS)
  • Environment Digimap – landcover maps for different years, from the Centre of Ecology and Hydrology (CEH).  This collection includes scans of the Dudley Stamp Land Use maps from the 1930s
  • Aerial Digimap – detailed aerial photography in a single seamless coverage, captured since 2000

A simple print out can be produced, or data can be downloaded and used in a Geographical Information System in conjunction with your own data. Look at the GIS & remote sensing section of our LibGuide to find other online sources of digital maps and data.

How to find them

To find paper maps the first step is to search the Enterprise catalogue. Search for the location you want, then refine using the format in the ‘Limit these results’ function to include only maps and atlases (atlases are listed separately – you may need to select ‘more’ to see all the options). Try not to be too specific – a more general search will produce better results.

For more information about searching for maps in Enterprise, and maps in general see the Maps LibGuide.

You can also see our short video presentation, Using maps for your research in University of Reading Library.

Or you can ask the Map Librarian! I am happy to help –  email me for an appointment, or find me at the 3rd Floor Information Desk.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Judith Fox, Map Librarian.

Video for teaching and learning – find out more at TEL Fest 2017!

Recently we posted our Info Tip about some of our great Video streaming resources that you can use in lectures and course materials to engage students and bring some variety to your teaching and learning. If you are a member of Staff at University of Reading and would like to find out more the Library will be getting involved with some of the events at this week’s TEL Fest 2017!

Tuesday 11 July, 13:00-14:00 we’ll be at the TEL Roadshow to talk informally about Box of Broadcasts and how you can use it in lectures, reading lists and BlackBoard. Come and join us in Carrington 201- no need to book, just drop in at 13:00 for a bite to eat and a chat!

Thursday 13 July, 14:30-16:00 Markeda Cole from Learning on Screen is presenting: Bob’s your uncle! Using TV & radio programmes from Box of Broadcasts to enhance T & L – more information and how to book a place on this session

So come along and get involved in the festival experience!

Natalie Guest, Multimedia manager

Do you use Lidar? New data trial in Digimap

LidarDigimap have announced a trial of a new service – Digimap Lidar. Download Lidar data for England, Scotland and Wales as Digital Terrain Models, Digital Surface Models and the raw LAS point file data.

The data will be available until July 31 – for more information see the Digimap blog post.

If you are using or intend to use Lidar in your research, have a look at what’s there and fill in the short survey – you could win a £20 Amazon voucher!

3D scene with Aerial imagery and Lidar

3D scene showing imagery with hillshading derived from the 50cm Lidar DSM. © Getmapping Plc, © Environment Agency copyright and/or database right 2015. All rights reserved.

Judith Fox, Map Librarian

Need maps? Try Digimap – info tip

If you need maps of Great Britain, think aDigimapbout using Digimap – Digimap delivers maps and map data from official sources to UK higher education, and you can easily create authoratative location and site maps.  There are five different collections available to members of the University of Reading:

  • historic_promo_smallDigimap – contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and data, ranging from small scale base maps to detailed large scale plans
  • Historic Digimap – historic Ordnance Survey maps from 1840 to the 1990s.  They can be compared side-by-side to help follow changes in the landscape
  • Geology Digimap – geology maps and data from the British Geological Survey (BGS)
  • Environment Digimap – landcover maps for different years, from the Centre of Ecology and Hydrology (CEH).  This collection includes scans of the Dudley Stamp Land Use maps from the 1930s
  • Aerial Digimap – contemporary aerial photography from Getmapping plc.

You will need to register to use Digimap – it is quick and easy to do.  Follow the instructions on our Digimap page.

geology_promo_smallOnce registered, you can select and print maps of Great Britain using the ‘Roam’ interface from whichever collection you want.  Roam includes tools to annotate your maps, and you can save them for future use. You can also measure distances and areas. Printing is possible at sizes from A4 up to A0, or you can save it as a pdf or a jpg to insert in Word.

If you prefer, you can download the map data to use in a Geographical Information System such as ArcGIS or QGIS.

environment_promo_smallExtensive help is available from the Digimap Resource Centre and from the Digimap YouTube channel, or you can email your Site Representative – Judith Fox, the Map Librarian.

To find out more about maps in the Library see our Maps guide.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Judith Fox, Map Librarian

Eye spy… try out our new resource showing Britain from the air

Avebury Aerial DigimapWe now have access to Aerial Digimap, a new addition to the Digimap suite of mapping databases. It consists of detailed vertical aerial photography, which can be viewed, annotated, printed or downloaded.  Maps are viewed in Aerial Roam as a single seamless coverage of Great Britain, with optional Ordnance Survey background mapping.

The imagery is provided by Getmapping plc in a jpg format, and can be printed at scales from 1:250 to 1:175,000. A sliding control in Aerial Roam allows you to choose how much of the background mapping you show, and the data will be regularly updated. Downloaded data can be combined in a geographical information system (GIS) with other Digimap data such as OS MasterMap or used to produce 3D models in conjunction with, for example, OS Terrain DTM.

Why should I use it?

  • Henley Business School Aerial DigimapIf you are studying archaeology it will aid visualisation of a site within its landscape, and may allow things not visible at ground level to be discerned.
  • Environmental and biological scientists can use it to help to identify conservation areas and habitats, and to measure specific land uses.
  • Studying architecture and urban planning? Use Aerial Digimap to view infrastructure networks, and to closely examine buildings using the detailed, 25 cm resolution of the imagery.

Using Aerial Digimap

To use Aerial Digimap you will need to accept the licence terms and conditions.  It will prompt you to do this the first time you use it.

Help is available in the Digimap Resource Centre, and there are useful videos available on the Digimap YouTube channel.  Alternatively, contact the Map Librarian for information and help.

Judith Fox, Map Librarian