Arts and hums books move floors for refurb

books being packed into cratesIn advance of refurbishing the Library Building’s 3rd Floor, we are moving arts and humanities print books from here to the 2nd and 4th Floors. This is part of our strategy to always give you access to print books in the Library throughout the Refurbishment Project, although they will move location from time to time as work is carried out on different floors, and follows our making space for books by moving print journals off-site.

Where are arts and humanities books going?

Art and humanities books normally shelved on the 3rd Floor include those with Call Numbers in the 100s (philosophy, psychology), 200s (religion), 400s (languages), 700s (arts), 800s (literature), music CDs and the Teaching Practice Collection.

Moving temporarily down to the 2nd Floor will be (progress in red):

  • 100s, 200s, 400s, 700s, 800s normal size items (Call Numbers with no prefix before number) – 100s, 200s, 400s, 700-711.45 already arrived. Subsequent class numbers will move over the next few days/weeks.

Moving temporarily up to the 4th Floor will be:

  • Language dictionaries and 3rd Floor Reference books – already arrived.
  • 100s, 200s, 400s, 700s, 800s larger size items (Call Numbers beginning ‘folio’ or ‘middle folio’) – not yet moved.
  • Teaching Practice Collection – not yet moved.

book shelves in the second floor reading roomThe catalogue will updated as soon as possible, and new floor plans are in progress. If you have any difficulty locating anything during the moves, please ask us for help at the 2nd or 4th Floor Information Desks.

More information

Find more about the Library’s major £40 million refurbishment on the Library Refurbishment Project webpage (see FAQ 6 on book moves) or email us at library@reading.ac.uk.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

Out-of-hours Library chat this summer

The summer vacation is finally here! From Saturday 10 June until Friday 15 September, the Library Building and URS Building will be operating summer vacation opening hours. Wherever you are this summer, there are still a number of Library services and resources available.

Out-of-hours virtual enquiry service

During staffed service hours, you can contact UoR Library staff to help with your enquiries. But what about when the Library and URS Buildings are closed (evenings and weekends over the summer vacation)? During these times, you can chat online via the blue ‘Virtual Enquiry Service’ box on the Library webpage.

This service is staffed by professional librarians working remotely to answer your queries from our website and other information we’ve supplied.  You can keep an email transcript of the chat. If they can’t resolve a particular issue they’ll refer you back to us during staffed hours.

Going away this summer?

If you are travelling further afield this summer, there is still a wealth of information available right at your fingertips. Check out our tips for searching and accessing a wide variety of e-resources from off-campus.

Don’t forget, summer vacation loans also give undergraduate and taught postgraduate students the opportunity to borrow standard loan item all summer! You may even be able to borrow from a university library nearer to you by registering with the SCONUL Access Scheme.

Lucy Shott, Library User Services

Do you use Lidar? New data trial in Digimap

LidarDigimap have announced a trial of a new service – Digimap Lidar. Download Lidar data for England, Scotland and Wales as Digital Terrain Models, Digital Surface Models and the raw LAS point file data.

The data will be available until July 31 – for more information see the Digimap blog post.

If you are using or intend to use Lidar in your research, have a look at what’s there and fill in the short survey – you could win a £20 Amazon voucher!

3D scene with Aerial imagery and Lidar

3D scene showing imagery with hillshading derived from the 50cm Lidar DSM. © Getmapping Plc, © Environment Agency copyright and/or database right 2015. All rights reserved.

Judith Fox, Map Librarian

Reading wherever you are: using Library resources from further afield

Are you away from Reading and the UK this summer? Maybe…

  • Spending a year abroad?
  • Going on industrial placement?

Don’t worry! You will still be able to access thousands of University of Reading Library resources from anywhere in the world – all you need is your University username and password and an internet connection. We have hundreds of thousands of e-books and e-journals for you to choose from.

Resources you can access wherever you are

You can still access most of the e-resources provided by the Library including…

  • The Library catalogue, Enterprise – search to find e-books. Simply conduct your search and then use the limit options on the left of the screen to select ‘Book’, followed by ‘Online’ to find e-books.

Enterprise

  • Search Summon, the Library’s discovery service, to find full-text journal articles, e-book chapters, online encyclopedia and dictionary entries and newspaper articles.
  • If you wish to widen your search to materials held elsewhere, you can search for journal articles and other materials using a database. Some databases contain the full-text of the item, while others provide a reference and maybe an abstract only. If only a reference is provided, you are usually able to check for full-text access via the Item Finder – just click on the blue “Search for item at Reading” link to find out if the Library has online access.
  • Online dictionaries and encyclopedias – these are a good place to start your research and are much more reliable sources of information than Wikipedia. They can be searched individually or through Summon.
  • Google Scholar – finds scholarly literature in all areas of research. Don’t forget to set it up so that it links to the University of Reading Library’s electronic journal holdings as this will increase the number of articles you can access!

How to access electronic resources from off-campus

Aeroplanes

If you follow links from the Library website, Enterprise, or Summon you will be given the easiest route to logging in when you are off-campus. Usually you will just be prompted to login with your University username and password. Occasionally, if you access an e-resource via a search engine, you may need to select ‘University of Reading’ from a list of institutions before you can login. To find out more, see Accessing e-resources.

Please note: These resources are for your personal use only (you should not use them on behalf of your placement company or your friends); for more details, see our terms and conditions of use for Library e-resources. A few databases are only accessible from the UK; consult your liaison librarian if you have any questions or concerns.

Studying a language abroad as part of your degree?

Find the Useful Websites page for the language you study. It will give you lists of, and links to, selected resources in your country of destination, such as library catalogues, listings of journals, access to the media, links to organisations and other useful tips.

Going on industrial placement in the UK?

If you go on an industrial placement in the UK as part of your course and there is another university library nearby, you may be able to borrow from there by registering via SCONUL Access.

Help in your subject

If you require further guidance about the e-resources available in your subject, remember to look at the relevant Library subject guide. You are also welcome to contact your subject liaison librarian for advice on locating resources; they are always happy to answer your email enquiries.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Charlie Carpenter, Liaison Librarian (History, GCMS and International Study and Language Institute).

Library systems upgrades: 3-4 and 17-18 July

Sam Tyler grins whilst holding travel mug up to the camera

Systems Manager, Sam Tyler, will be celebrating with fizzy pop in his branded Library travel mug once Library systems are all successfully updated in July.

This summer the Library is upgrading its Library Management System in order to gain a more robust system and maintain its security. However, please be aware that there may be some disruption to Library services whilst we are setting this up on Monday 3 to Tuesday 4 July and Monday 17 to Tuesday 18 July 2017.

If you plan to use the Library on these days, either in person or online, please check our University Library News blog nearer the time to see how the system upgrade could affect you. The Library will remain open throughout, as will most of our systems’ functionality.

We hope that you have a great summer and are looking forward to a new upgrades as much as we are!

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Sam Tyler, Library Systems Manager

Print journals move as Library refurb progresses

blue crates on floor beside half-filled shelves of print journalsOur Library Refurbishment Project moves into another phase as we begin to shift around various print materials on the Library Building’s 2nd, 3rd and 4th Floors. Throughout the Project, you will always be able to access print books here, but they will move location as work is carried out on different floors. We are creating space for books by moving print journals off site.

If you have any difficulty locating anything during the moves, please ask Library staff for help at the 2nd or 4th Floor Information Desks.

Journals move progress

Journals began to move off-site from the week of 22 May. By the week beginning 12 June, we had moved to storage all 3rd and 4th Floor journals are in storage, and are beginning to move out 2nd Floor journals which should take another two and a bit weeks to complete.

The few print journals will remain in the Library Building because they are essential for study and teaching. They will be housed at the back of the 4th Floor, next to the legislation and European Documentation Centre (EDC) material, along with all new issues of current titles. They should arrive there in the week beginning 19 June.

Using journals

Library staff have planned ahead to reduce the impact moving print issues might have had for those using journals:

More informationEmpty shelves reced into distance. Crates in centre. Lone figure pushes away more crates

Find more about the Library’s major £40 million refurbishment on the Library Refurbishment Project webpage (see FAQ 3 and 6 regarding journals) or email us at library@reading.ac.uk.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

 

Summer vacation loans are landing!

AeroplanesFrom Thursday 1 June to Tuesday 5 September the standard loan period for undergraduate and taught postgraduate students is extended until Tuesday 26 September or until the end of your course, whichever is earlier. Standard loan periods for other Library borrowers remain unchanged.

All other loan periods and fines for late return remain the same! So please take care when borrowing 7-day loans, Course Collection items and journals. Make sure you check your University account regularly for due dates.

Remember

  • Standard loans – yours all summer if you are an undergraduate or Masters student!
  • 7-day loans – remain the same so keep renewing! If an item cannot be renewed or is recalled, be prepared to post it back to us.
  • Course Collection items and journals – remain the same so keep checking your account!
  • Fines – pay online via the Campus Card Portal or call us.

Lucy Shott, Library User Services

Help stop desk hogging in Library@URS

Library's 'Looking for study space?' card in red and greyAlthough your study space has moved into the URS Building, we all still think it unfair for students to try to reserve desks by leaving their belongings behind.

If this affects you, please go to either the URS Reception desk by the main entrance or the URS Information Desk next to the Course Collection on the ground floor and ask Library staff for support. We have warning cards you can place on unattended stuff.

Put the belongings to one side and sit down. If the owner returns within the hour, they are entitled to the space back. If not, you can sit there instead. Also ask staff to help explain if anyone returning after an hour complains.

Where unattended stuff hasn’t been moved overnight, staff will remove it to URS Reception. If it is not claimed by the next morning, it will be taken to Palmer Reception, the centre for all lost property in the University  (open in exam-time Monday to Friday, 13:00-14:00 only).

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Sue Egleton, Head of Systems and User Services.

Noisy chat in Library@URS? Text us!

Lower part of face with forefinger placed to lipsAre others chatting too noisily in the Library’s URS Building? Alert us by text, without identifying yourself to others or leaving your seat!

First check your URS study area really is designated as ‘quiet’ or ‘silent’, or that noise in a ‘group study area’ is excessive. If it is, text:

  • NOISYCHAT‘ and your location to 07796 300114 
  • eg NOISYCHAT 2n19 Silent Study.

We’ll come and investigate. We support your right to to work quietly, as protected by Library Rule 13.

For more information, and a list of URS Building locations, see our Noise in the Library webpage.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator
for Robin Hunter, Facilities Manager

 

Savvy searching on the Internet – info tip

Laptop and a bookThe Internet contains huge amounts of information, but do you know which sites are most reliable to use in your academic assignments?

Read on to learn more about internet sources for academic study.

Online reference sources

Reference materials such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are especially useful when you are looking for short introductions to a topic in order to start work on your assignment and they often point to useful books or articles on the subject that you can use for further reading.

General online reference sources

Although Wikipedia is one of the most popular online reference sites you should not cite it in your essays.  Anyone can add or edit pages meaning that articles are not necessarily written by experts; they may be of poor quality or contain errors.

There are more reliable and authoritative general reference sources available, including the following, which the Library subscribes to:

  • Britannica Online– the leading general reference title, peer-reviewed with entries written by experts in their field. Also available in printed format at the Library.
  • Credo Reference – Search over 250 published reference titles. Find longer articles and web pages too.
  • Oxford Reference – high quality, ‘peer-reviewed’ sources from Oxford University Press.

Reference sources for specific subjects

You can also find printed or online reference works that are specific to your subject area. For a list of recommended titles, consult the ‘Dictionaries & encyclopedias’ tab of your Subject guide. In this guide, you will also find a list of reliable, authoritative websites for your subject area.

Alternatively, you can ask your subject liaison librarian, or a member of staff working at a Library Information Desk, to recommend good quality dictionaries for you.

Google scholar

Google Scholar is the academic version of Google.  It allows you to search for scholarly literature from a variety of online resources.  However, be aware that your search results will also include material that the Library does not subscribe to, so you may not be able to access everything you find.

google scholarTo make the most of Google Scholar you might like to adjust the settings so that it displays links to the University of Reading Library. This lets you quickly access material that the Library subscribes to from your results list. Simply click on Settings then Library links to set this up. For full instructions and further information, have a look at our guide to accessing Google Scholar and some useful features of the search engine.

Google Scholar is a useful tool but remember that it only searches a small proportion of publications, so use it alongside other sources for a comprehensive literature search. Also, you should still evaluate the sources that you find for reliability, currency and authority.

Evaluating Internet Resources: Authority, Accuracy, Currency

Phone and books on a deskThere are many different electronic resources available on the Internet, and they are all of varying quality so whether you are looking at reference materials, websites or blogs, make sure you properly evaluate their reliability before you use them in your assignments.

To help you do this there is a Library guide and Study Advice video tutorial on evaluating websites. These contain useful tips to help you judge the accuracy and reliability of your search results, as well as providing some alternatives that are guaranteed to give you good references.

Citing Websites

Once you have found an appropriate website for your research make sure that you reference it correctly. There is guidance on how to do this in the Citing References LibGuide.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by, Natalie Guest, Liaison Librarian for Biological Sciences and Document Delivery Co-ordinator, and Louise Cowan, Trainee Liaison Librarian for Classics and Philosophy.

Study space at Whiteknights this Bank Holiday weekend

For students looking to study on Whiteknights campus this weekend, Saturday 29 April, Sunday 30 April and Monday 1 May:

  • Study space in the URS Building will be open 24-hours (except Saturday night). Please speak to Library staff if you need help finding a space.
  • The Library Building is also open 09:00-22:00 for access to books.
  • RUSU’s The Study will also be open 08:00-21:00 on these days.
  • If you want access to a computer, you can access 24-hour labs in other buildings with your Campus Card:
    • Agriculture (GL20) – 30 PCs
    • Meteorology (GL68) – 20 PCs
    • Palmer (G09) – 20 PCs

For further information about weekday alternative study spaces, check out the ‘FIND STUDY SPACE BEYOND THE LIBRARY’ section on the Library Refurbishment Project page

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator