Library/URS buildings open additional weekends in vacation

Christmas presentsThe University is pleased to confirm that, following student feedback, we have made arrangements for the Library and URS buildings to be open for two additional weekends during the forthcoming Christmas vacation period as follows:

  • Saturday 9 and Sunday 10 December (09:00-17:00)
  • Saturday 16 and Sunday 17 December (09:00-17:00)

The Library will be open for access to printed books with self-service borrowing and returns.

The URS Building will be open for study (including use of PCS) and self-service borrowing and returns from Course Collection.

Both buildings will be supervised by our Security team. For any Library-related queries, students can seek advice from qualified staff using our online chat service, accessible from the Library homepage.

Full details of Library and URS Building opening hours, including vacation times, are available online.

We are currently working on finalising our opening hours for the Easter vacation period and will confirm details nearer the time.

Full details of the Library refurbishment, including FAQ, project summary, latest news and study space links, are available on our dedicated project website: reading.ac.uk/library/refurb.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
University Communications

Problems accessing Nature

Computer keyboard
We are currently experiencing access problems with Nature.

If you are trying to link to a Nature article via Summon, or to a journal on this platform you have found via the E-journals Finder, you may find that you are unable to gain access even after you have logged in.

Access is still available

This problem affects off-campus access only – on-campus access is unaffected. We are working to fix the problem as quickly as possible, but in the meantime you can still access the content you need on Nature from off-campus.

Please locate articles in the usual way, either by using Summon or the E-Journals Finder. You will see an option to subscribe to the journal you are accessing underneath the abstract of the article. Please click the ‘Login via Shibboleth’ link underneath this, and search for ‘University of Reading’. Once you have clicked on our institution, you should be able to login with your usual username and password and gain access.

We are working with our supplier to fix this, and will post an update once access is working normally.

If you have tried the method above and are still unable to gain access to content, please submit an E-resources problem report form and we will investigate the issue for you.

Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Sophie Dorman, E-resources Team

IEEE Xplore subscription ending

Open laptop with notepadThe Library has recently taken the difficult decision to cancel our subscription to IEEE Xplore. Since April 2017 we have been in discussions with IEEE and their UK agents over a new 3-year deal for IEEE Xplore Digital Library. In spite of the fact that the University no longer has a School of Systems Engineering, and usage of the resource has been reducing for several years, the proposed pricing from IEEE was unacceptable, and indeed represented an increase on what we had previously paid. There is no transparent pricing system for this resource, and no significant reductions in price were offered. We would have liked to continue the subscription, but unfortunately had reached a point where a resource represents such poor value for money that cancelling it becomes necessary.

We understand that this may cause some difficulties for staff and students, however we will be taking out a number of individual subscriptions to key IEEE journals, which will be hosted on the IEEE Xplore Digital Library platform. These will be available from 1st January 2018, when the subscription year starts.

If you would like any more information, including help on locating specific articles via alternative routes (such as Open Access copies or inter-library loan), please contact your Liaison Librarian

Paul Johnson
Associate Director (Collections Research & Space)

E-books: access key texts wherever you are! – info tip

Are all the print copies of the book you need to read out on loan? Have you reached the limit on the number of books you can borrow at any one time from the Library but you still need to read more? Is it cold and raining and you just don’t want to leave your room? No problem – the Library may have an e-book! E-books are available to you 24/7 from any device which is connected to the internet so are great when you’re off-campus. If you haven’t used e-books before, or want to make sure you’re getting the best experience, have a look at our LibGuide on e-books.

Finding e-books

You can find e-books using either Enterprise or Summon. Enter your search terms into the search box, then refine your results. On Enterprise you will need to choose the Online and Book filters on the left-hand side; on Summon you can select the Publication Type E-book from the filters on the left-hand side. See the Library’s guide on Summon for tips on how to make your results even more specific to what you need.

Accessing e-books

It’s important to know that our e-books are not all available on the same platform. Take a look at the Library’s page on e-books for a list of the different available platforms and more information on what they will let you do.

Woman using laptopAlthough all our e-books can be accessed from any device with an internet connection, most e-book platforms do not automatically re-format the size of the text to fit your device. For the best viewing experience we would recommend accessing our e-books from a PC or laptop computer.

Most of our e-books use online e-reader software which is integrated into the platform, so you should not need to download any additional software. For some e-books you will need to download the relevant chapters in PDF format to view them. You will need Adobe Acrobat to read these.

Some of our e-books can be downloaded in full, but you may be prompted to install Adobe Digital Editions software to view them on your device. This software is different to Adobe Acrobat.

How can e-books help you to study smarter?

E-books have features which you can use to help you in your studies. For instance, you can search the text electronically to find key words or phrases. You can easily print off specific pages from most e-books, saving you the trouble of photocopying (though remember that rules about Copyright and the amount you can copy still apply). You can also annotate the e-book, writing your own notes which you can print or export. Don’t try doing this on a paper Library book!

If you’re using reference management software like EndNote, you may be able to directly export the details you will need for your citations. Do remember to use details for the e-book version, as page numbers may not be the same as in the print version. For more information on referencing, see our Citing References guide, or the Academic Integrity Toolkit.

ebookWhy can’t I access this e-book?

Some platforms, such as MyiLibrary and EBSCOhost only allow an e-book to be viewed by one or sometimes three people at a time. If you get a message saying the e-book is already in use, take a quick break and try accessing it again after a few minutes.

Any problems?

If you’d like more help on how to find and use e-books effectively, get in touch with your Liaison Librarian. If you’re experiencing technical difficulties accessing e-books, please contact the E-resources Team via the Problem Report Form.

 

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Rachael Scott, Content Manager and Kim Shahabudin, Study Adviser.

Finding the most useful resources in your subject – info tip

If you’ve ever felt a little overwhelmed by the range of resources that the library has on offer then you might like to take a look at your very own subject guide! Every subject has a liaison librarian, and they have put together a guide for each subject with lots of helpful information and advice.

subject resources link on library webpageWhere do I find my subject guide?

To access the guide for your subject just click on the “Explore your subject guide” button in the Subject Resources section of the Library homepage.

What will I find there?Fine art subject guide

Each guide is set up in a similar way. It will show you how to find books, reference materials, journal articles, electronic resources and other helpful websites that relate specifically to your subject.
You can find out the latest new books that have been bought, which databases will be the most helpful in your research, and also who your liaison librarian is and how to contact them, so you know who to come to for more help! There’s also our useful guide on citing references in your work.

How do I find the type of information I need?subject guide tabs

The subject guides are divided into several sections, each with its own tab at the top of the page.
The Dictionaries and Encyclopedias tab gives links to online dictionaries and encyclopedias as well as highlighting key print titles that are in the reference section in the Library. There are links to general resources such as Credo Reference or Oxford Reference and more specific resources for your subject. It is far more reliable to use these sources than to use Wikipedia for your work.

The Books tab gives you tips on finding books using Enterprise and lists Call Numbers for particular topics within your subject area as well as telling you about new books that have been purchased for your subject.

The Journal articles tab gives you tips on finding journal articles on Summon and gives links to the key databases in your subject.

The E-resources tab will point you toward the key databases, but also suggests other useful resources, such as image databases or company financial databases that may be relevant to your subject.

The Websites tab gives you a list of websites that have been checked by subject specialists and could be useful for your work. There are also hints about how to evaluate a website, so if you run an internet search you can be more confident you are using reliable information.

The Citing references tab points you in the right direction for getting help with referencing and avoiding plagiarism. It also links to our information on using EndNote, bibliographic software which can take the hassle out of referencing.

Your librariansContact us!

We want to help you find the information you need. Please contact your subject liaison librarian if you are stuck.
The subject guide has links to their email address and office hours. You can also check out the Help tab for more advice.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Karen Drury and Ruth Ng, Liaison Librarians.

Weekend study space / Library refurb progress

Weekend Library study space

Students studying in the URS BuildingStarting this Friday (17 November), students will be able to make use of additional study space in the URS building over the weekends. Rooms 2s14, 2s21, 2s25, 2s26 and 2s27 will be open for use from 18:00 on Fridays until 08:00 on Mondays, during term time. These rooms had to be closed when the Large Lecture Theatre in URS was reopened in September. They will still be closed on term-time weekdays but will be open for use over the weekends and also during vacations and summer terms when the lecture theatre is closed.

The Library also has arrangements in place to open up space in the Chancellor’s Building on Saturdays and Sundays between 10:00 and 18:00 if the Library@URS reaches capacity. Users are requested to talk to Library staff at the URS Ground Floor Information Desk if they are having difficulty in finding a space.

Library refurbishment progress

Work has begun on the installation of the cladding towards the front of the University Library. Over the next weeks, the contractors will be installing cladding brackets and rails on the exterior walls, which will involve heavy drilling. Occupants of Edith Morley, Whiteknights House and URS buildings may experience a higher than usual noise level, but are advised that the noisiest drilling work will finish by 10:00 every day.

Meanwhile, work continues inside the Library with the focus on the internal and service works on the Basement, Ground and 1st Floors; surveying and ductwork on the 4th Floor; works to the roof and 5th and 6th Floor plant room; and, weather proofing of the north, east and south sides.

The path diversion in place outside the Library will continue and we will keep you updated on the progress.

Stay up-to-date 

Keep checking the Library blog for the latest refurbishment news and updates. For more information on the Library refurbishment, please see our dedicated project page: www.reading.ac.uk/library/refurb.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator
and University Communications

More Library study space at weekends

Students studying in the URS Building

Weekend group study rooms include sofas and easy chairs.

We’re providing more Library group study space for students at weekends within the URS building, plus an option to open more space in Chancellor’s building on request!

Weekend/vacation/summer URS group study rooms

Due to fire safety limits on URS building occupancy, certain group study rooms had to be closed when the University brought the Large Lecture Theatre back into use in September 2017. However, from Friday 17 November 2017 we have arranged for weekend reopening of those study rooms whilst the theatre is unused. Rooms 2s14, 2s21, 2s25, 2s26 and 2s27 will open at 18:00 on term-time Fridays and close at 08:00 on Monday mornings.

These rooms will also open during vacations and summer terms, ensuring the maximum study space capacity can be used at exam revision time.

Ask for extra weekend space in Chancellor’s building

Even with the full complement of study space restored to around 800, we appreciate that the URS building may still become very busy at weekends. Although RUSU’s The Study and The Study @ TOB2 also open weekends, other additional campus study space available weekdays may not.

Therefore, we have arranged that if URS study space reaches capacity on a Saturday or Sunday between 10:00 and 18:00, the senior library supervisor will be able to request the Chancellor’s building be opened as well. So please ask at the URS Information Desk if you think you need more space.

More information 

Details of URS and Library building weekend opening hours are available online.

All the latest Library refurbishment news is available on the Library blog. For more information on Library refurbishment, please see our dedicated Library Refurbishment Project page.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator

Referencing headaches? Online tools can help – info tip

Do you struggle with referencing? Have you been Laptop, book and glassesmarked down for incomplete or inconsistent references? There are some online tools that can help!

Why use online referencing tools?

  1. You can use them to store accurate details of publications to use in your assignments.
  2. They can save you time compiling, checking and correcting references – just insert the citation and a bibliography is created automatically. You can also reformat your citations in a different style at the click of a button.
  3. You can add notes to your references, to remind yourself of specific parts you might want to use.
  4. Some allow you to store PDFs of the sources with your references, so that everything is together and in most cases available on any computer.

If you use an online tool you still need to know when to include a citation, and understand the principles of referencing. You can find help on this in Study Advice’s referencing guide or referencing video tutorials. You also need to be aware of which style your department requires you to use – consult your course handbook for details.

Which one should I use?

If you are an undergraduate or masters student…

… we recommend using EndNote Web. This online resource can be used on any computer (including your own PC or laptop) and is free to use.

You can get accurate reference details into it by: using the Online Search facility with the Library catalogue; the export option from Web of Science or EBSCO resources; or by importing records from Summon and other databases.

Once the EndNote toolbar is installed in Word, you can insert citations from EndNote Web into your assignments and it will automatically build the bibliography at the end. Select from a list of common referencing styles (including the University’s own ‘Harvard for Reading’ style) to format your bibliography.

EndNote Web is fully supported by the Library, so if you need 1-1 help, there will be someone here who can help.

To get started, come along to a workshop, try our step-by-step guide to using EndNote Web, or watch an introductory video.

If you are a research postgraduate or member of staff…

… we recommend using Desktop EndNote. This can be installed free of charge on any University-owned computer, and is already available on most campus PCs. A personal copy can be purchased at the discounted price of around £98.

References can be easily captured from many databases, and you can use the ‘Find full-text’ feature to automatically attach article PDFs to those references. A very large number of referencing styles are provided, including those for specific journals. You can download other ones from the EndNote website, or create your own by editing existing styles. It is also possible to share your EndNote library by synchronising with an EndNote Web account – useful for collaboration.

Find out more by coming along to a workshop, trying our step-by-step guides, or watching a brief introductory video.

Other options

There are a number of other referencing tools available, including Mendeley, Zotero and Word’s own referencing facility. Although we do not provide support for these, we have provided links to online guidance and videos via our Managing references guide.

Help

If you need help with using EndNote, or with any aspect of citing references, contact your subject liaison librarian who will be happy to help.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager & Liaison Librarian.

Book it, Borrow it! Introducing Course Collection.

What is Course Collection?SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Course Collection consists of high demand and essential reading list materials suggested by your lecturers and is located on the ground floor of the URS Building.

Most items are available to borrow but a few items can only be used within the section.

So how does it work?

  • Borrow 2 items at a time
  • 6-hour loans
  • Overnight loan on items borrowed after 16:00
  • Weekend loans on items borrowed after 16:00 Friday

Book the book!

Did you know you can book Course Collections items for use on a specific day? Book up to two items on our Library catalogue up to seven days in advance. Just click the “Book a Course Collection Copy” link.

bookingsChoose to pick up your book between the following times:

  • Daytime: 10:00 – 11:00
  • Overnight: 16:00 – 17:00

Items booked for collection between 16:00 – 17:00 on Friday will be due back the following Monday at 10:00.

Remember to always check your receipt for the return time!

Fines for overdue Course Collection items are 80p per hour or part of an hour.

Holly Thomas, Library User Services

 

 

Refurbishment: Covered walkway over Library entrance

Scaffolding bridges grey hoarding infront of building

Work on a covered walkway up to the entrance should take place before the Library opens at 09:00.

From the week beginning 6 November, contractors aim to work early in the morning to build a covered walkway up to the Library building door. They will cease before the Library opens at 09:00, so access to all your books will not be compromised.

This work completes precautions to safely separate us from refurbishment works soon progressing to the front of the building. Hoarding has already moved forward, with paths moved to where bike shelters used to be. Alternative bike racks are by the URS building, in Palmer quad and outside Whiteknights House.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

 

Library recall notices – check your clutter!

If you’re using Office 365 to access your University email account remember to check your clutter folder regularly. Some Library communications such as urgent recall notices maybe sorted into your clutter folder, so please be vigilant.

To ensure these emails are automatically sorted into your Inbox in future, either right click on the message and choose ‘Mark as not clutter’, or just drag it to the Inbox. These recall notices are important reminders that you need to return checked out items sooner than the original due date, otherwise fines of 80p per item per day will be incurred on your account. Find out more about borrowing from the Library here.

Holly Thomas, Library User Services

 

 

Help stop Library@URS desk hogging!

Library's 'Looking for study space?' card in red and greyPlease help us share study space in the URS building fairly. It is fine to pop over to the Library building for a book and return to your desk within a short time. However, we think it unfair for students to reserve desks with their belongings for long periods when other students want to use that space.

If you find unattended study places apparently ‘booked’ with clothes, stationery and the like, please ask Library staff for support at either the URS Reception desk by the main entrance or the URS Information Desk next to the Course Collection on the ground floor. We will give you a timed warning card you can place on the abandoned stuff. Put the belongings to one side and sit down. If the owner returns within the hour, they are entitled to the space back. If not, you can sit there. Also ask staff to help explain, should anyone returning after an hour complain.

Where unattended stuff hasn’t been moved overnight, staff will remove it to URS Reception. If it is not claimed by the next morning, it will be taken to Palmer Reception, the centre for all lost property in the University.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Sue Egleton, Head of Systems and User Services.