Illustrate to communicate – make your point with an image! – info tip

The Library has a number of sources of copyright-cleared images which you can use in your assignments and University work. Why not explore some of the resources listed below in order to enrich your projects with pictures that illustrate your point?

Images can be a persuasive addition to your argument, but remember to consider them critically as with any source and reference images appropriately, giving credit to the original source.

Finding images

The main resource for images is Britannica Image Quest – it includes over 2.7 million images from various collections including National Geographic, Getty Images, National History Museum and more.

There are lots of other databases that provide images, or include both text and images but allow you to search for images only. See what’s available on our Image and sound page.

Image search engines

There is also a wealth of images available online, some of which are made available for non-commercial use in project work and presentations. These are labelled as Creative Commons images.

You can find these by using a number of search engines and photo-sharing websites, including Xpert search and attribution. Xpert searches Creative Commons licensed material and allows you to download the image with the appropriate attribution and licence details integrated – easy!

For further guidance on using images legally, see the University’s advice on copyright

University image collections

The University has several image collections students can use to improve their work. Special Collections have many images of the items in their collections on their website which can be used in unpublished and non-commercial works. Special Collections covers many areas including Samuel Beckett, early English coins, early anatomy books and publishers’ archives. Please contact them if you want to know more about using these images.

Citing images

Like everything you refer to in your academic work, you need to cite the author of your image and where you got it from – see our advice on how to cite an image

Need further advice?

For more guidance contact your subject liaison librarian

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Natalie Guest, Multimedia Manager.

‘Careers on tour’: 7 March: Apollo Teaching

Speaker by large screen addresses audience seated at tablesWant to be introduced to a job assisting in schools with this agency? Chat to Apollo Teaching Services on Tuesday 7 March, 12:00-14:00 on the Library’s Ground Floor – where you will find UoR Careers most Tuesday lunchtimes, sharing their expertise and introducing employers. 

Apollo say, “There is a huge demand for teaching assistants and cover supervisors within schools in the Berkshire region. Apollo Teaching Services provide free certified training, and temporary or permanent vacancies for support staff in schools. You can earn between £75 and £100 per day and work around your schedule.

If you believe you can have a positive effect on the learning experience of children in primary and secondary schools, we want to meet you. Meet us in the Library on the 7 March from 12:00-14:00 or get in touch on 0118 334 0100 for an informal chat and find out how we can broaden your career opportunities.”

Further information

For more from Careers follow UoR Careers on Twitter. (UoR Job Shop covers news of part-time or vacation work).

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Isabella Masciaga, Careers Events Assistant

 

What are the Study Advisers up to? (March 2017)

This post is the first in a planned series of regular updates and timely tips from the Study Advice team. For more on any topic, see our website or contact us at studyadvice@reading.ac.uk.

Thinking about dissertations?

With undergraduates hopefully reaching the final stages of their dissertations and Masters students starting to embark upon theirs, it’s a good time to remind you of our guides and video tutorials to help make dissertations and longer research projects more successful. These include:

Students are also welcome to book one-to-one appointments with us for more individual advice on the process of planning, researching and writing their dissertations (all contact details on our website). Study Advice will be available during Easter and Summer vacations when many people stay on campus to work on their projects. So for dissertation advice and support, do come our way!

New team member

Erika Delbecque has joined the Study Advice Team as a Part-Time Study Adviser. She is no stranger to the University of Reading having previously worked at the University Library as a Trainee Liaison Librarian, and will continue to work as a Part-Time Librarian at the University’s Museums and Special Collections Services alongside her new role.

Her first degree is in English and Dutch Literature, and she has gained postgraduate qualifications in Education and in Librarianship. Erika is particularly interested in digital literacies and the impact of technology on student learning, innovative pedagogical practices, and in supporting international students.

Making exam revision more effective

Spring is on its way and so too are university exams. With this in mind, it’s worth remembering Study Advice resources to help with exam revision. We have a range of information in our study guide and a suite of video tutorials. These cover topics including:

Tutors are welcome to link to any of these resources in revision sessions.

We also have two seminars on exams, both in Palmer 105 from 2-3:

  • Wed 8 March: Revising for Exams
  • Wed 15 March: Writing for Exams

You don’t need to book for these informal workshops; just turn up. In addition, students can book a one-to-one appointment with a Study Adviser to discuss revision plans and strategies on an individual basis.

Bibliotherapy for Mental Health Awareness, 2 March

Have you seen the Library’s bibliotherapy display on our Ground Floor promoting a new Bibliotherapy online reading list. It is just one of several initiatives promoting University Mental Health Day on Thursday 2 March include themed talks and walks – which begin at the Chaplaincy behind the Library.

‘Bibliotherapy’ means therapeutic reading to help us understand our mental and emotional troubles, and how to cope with them. The Library holds a selection of self-help books on a variety of challenges including stress, anxiety, addition, bereavement and insomnia, to name but a few.

Reading students can use our Talis Aspire Bibliotherapy online reading list to see which books are available to them online or are loanable from the Library. Alternativly pick up a leaflet from the display or check out the useful resources, including guides and bibliotherapy lists, produced by UoR Counselling and Wellbeing.

Maybe one of these bibliotherapy books can help you begin to turn your world around – after all, 2 March is also World Book Day!

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

Keep it real with Sage business cases

Laptop, business chartsSAGE Business Cases can be used to see how business works in real life. Put the theories to the test and learn from the successes and failures of real companies in these case studies. Choose from over 1000 business cases.

This trial is available on- and off-campus until 30th March.

Help us to decide

Please send your feedback on this resource to Karen Drury and Ruth Ng, Management and Accounting Liaison Librarians – karenandruth@reading.ac.uk.

 Eóin Davies, E-resources Team

Suggest titles to diversify Library stock

Drawing of books piled up and swathed in chainsIn celebration of RUSU’s ‘Liberate my curriculum’ conference on Wednesday 1 March, we’re asking students to suggest books, DVDs or CDs to help Library collections support a more diverse curriculum. Would you like more on your specialism representing more ethnic or LBGT groups or geographical areas? Complete our new Diversify my curriculum suggestion form to help us spend a special £1,000 fund, over and above resources supporting existing reading lists.

It’s great if you can suggest specific titles, but we still want to hear from you where you feel we just need more in a certain area. For example:

  • [name] is underrepresented in your collection, can you buy more of her novels/poetry?
  • I would like more books on the construction industry in Africa – are there any that can be bought?
  • there aren’t any books on the history/political situation in [country]
  • can you purchase some more books on LBGT issues in higher education?

Your subject Liaison Librarian will be dealing with your suggestions. She or he can also help you with other Library matters, including queries about items on reading lists.

If you would like to suggest other items for the Library, please complete our regular book suggestion form.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator
for Helen Hathaway, Head of Academic Liaison and Support

Resolved – access problems with ScienceDirect

We are pleased to say that the remaining problems with access to ScienceDirect have been resolved and you should be able to use this resource as normal.

If you experience difficulties accessing any of our resources please fill in the E-resources problem report form and we will do our best to assist you.

Apologies for any inconvenience this has caused.

Lucy Ardill – E-resources Team

Count on Statistics! Info Tip

You’ve come up with a great argument for your essay, but how do you prove it one way or the other? Well one way is by using statistical evidence to support your position, and it might just get you a few extra marks as well.

What statistical sources are available?

Pie chart showing energy sourcesThe Library can provide you with access to a wealth of statistics covering a wide range of countries and subject areas.

The best sources of current statistics are online. For help on where to start looking go to the detailed guide to finding statistics.

A host of British statistics, covering agriculture, the environment, business, economic indicators, law, health, population and education, are freely available via the Office for National Statistics or as part of the Census data.

European statistics covering many of the same areas as the British statistics are available via the Eurostat service.

Comparative international statistics are produced by a number of bodies, UNESCO, the IMF, the OECD and the World Bank amongst others, and many of these are available via the UK Data Service (don’t let the name fool you). You do have to register separately with this provider but it is free.

If statistics are particularly relevant to your subject area, your liaison librarian may have written a guide to statistical sources in your subject – check for one for your subject.

Some historical statistics are available online, for example in International Historical Statistics Online, but you may also find what you are looking for amongst our books and periodicals. Search the Enterprise catalogue and include the words ‘statistics’ with the subject of your choice. Try not to be too specific – a more general search will produce better results.

 

Need further help?

If you need further help contact your subject liaison librarian who will be happy to help!

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Gordon Connell, Liaison Team Managers for Business & Social Sciences.

‘Careers on tour’: 28 February: Three

Black outline of large 3 with black flame-like lines insideFancy working for Three? Call on them Tuesday 28 February, 12:00-14:00 on the Library’s Ground Floor – where UoR Careers come to share their expertise and introduce employers most Tuesday lunchtimes.

Three say, “We’re an innovative communications company, driven by a passion to reinvent the rules and make mobile better. We believe everyone has the power to think outside the box and use their imagination to reinvent and make a real difference. We are visiting the University of Reading to talk about opportunities at Three and within the telecommunications industry.

We will also be letting you know about our three-day training programme for undergraduates, Reimagined Learning, where you get to visit us at HQ to work and deliver a business project with employees from across the business. This is a great boost for your CV, experience and confidence in presenting and team projects. Come along to our pop up stand in the Library to find out more and chat to us! We look forward to seeing you there.”

Further information

For more from Careers follow UoR Careers on Twitter. (UoR Job Shop covers news of part-time or vacation work).

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Isabella Masciaga, Careers Events Assistant

Need maps? Try Digimap – info tip

If you need maps of Great Britain, think aDigimapbout using Digimap – Digimap delivers maps and map data from official sources to UK higher education, and you can easily create authoratative location and site maps.  There are five different collections available to members of the University of Reading:

  • historic_promo_smallDigimap – contemporary Ordnance Survey maps and data, ranging from small scale base maps to detailed large scale plans
  • Historic Digimap – historic Ordnance Survey maps from 1840 to the 1990s.  They can be compared side-by-side to help follow changes in the landscape
  • Geology Digimap – geology maps and data from the British Geological Survey (BGS)
  • Environment Digimap – landcover maps for different years, from the Centre of Ecology and Hydrology (CEH).  This collection includes scans of the Dudley Stamp Land Use maps from the 1930s
  • Aerial Digimap – contemporary aerial photography from Getmapping plc.

You will need to register to use Digimap – it is quick and easy to do.  Follow the instructions on our Digimap page.

geology_promo_smallOnce registered, you can select and print maps of Great Britain using the ‘Roam’ interface from whichever collection you want.  Roam includes tools to annotate your maps, and you can save them for future use. You can also measure distances and areas. Printing is possible at sizes from A4 up to A0, or you can save it as a pdf or a jpg to insert in Word.

If you prefer, you can download the map data to use in a Geographical Information System such as ArcGIS or QGIS.

environment_promo_smallExtensive help is available from the Digimap Resource Centre and from the Digimap YouTube channel, or you can email your Site Representative – Judith Fox, the Map Librarian.

To find out more about maps in the Library see our Maps guide.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by Judith Fox, Map Librarian

Library refurbishment works 20 February – 13 March

Image of refurbished University Library surrounded by seating, trees and hedges.Between Monday 20 February and Monday 13 March the majority of refurbishment work will focus on re-cladding the Library’s exterior and will involve drilling – students may wish to use alternative study spaces if they are not comfortable with the noise around the Library.

The following construction work is expected to be carried out around the outside of the Library:

  • Re-cladding the outside: The majority of work will focus on re-cladding the Library’s exterior – these works will involve drilling and so may be noisy. The work will move around all sides of the Library. Students may wish to use alternative study spaces if they are not comfortable with the noise around the Library.
  • Ground works: Ground works will be evident around all sides of the Library.

For details of alternative spaces and the latest project news, please visit our Library refurbishment project page: www.reading.ac.uk/library/refurb.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator for University Communications

Library study space moves to URS Building

Three femal studetns walk infront of orange building with protruding sturts and undercroft on a sunny dayThe University will shortly be able to offer the URS Building instead of studying in the Library during its major refurbishment. We will be moving furniture and IT equipment from the Library into URS so that students can study in a comfortable and quiet space away from construction works.

What we are doing

  • Studying in URS will be quieter as it is further away from Library building works.
  • The URS Building will be open 24 hours in term (except Saturday night) just like the Library is now.
  • Course Collection will move into URS to maintain full access.
  • Books will remain in the Library and will be borrowed as usual.
  • Although Library staff will be based in URS, they will also run an information service in the Library building to help you find and borrow books there.
  • Using URS means the refurbishment will be finished earlier than originally planned.

838 study spaces (including 145 computers) will move into URS along with Library staff – so there’ll always be someone on hand to help. Cafélibro will also relocate to URS.

All books (excluding the Course Collection) will stay inside the Library and will be available to use and borrow as usual. The Course Collection will move into URS and will continue to be accessible for 24 hours in term-time, as the Library offers now.

As well as providing a quiet and convenient alternative space for students, using the URS Building will mean that the length of the refurbishment programme will be shortened by approximately six months, ending mid 2019 as opposed to late 2019 / early 2020 as originally planned.

The URS Building was vacated in December 2016 in preparation for the building’s own major redevelopment – as the programme is still under revision in light of the URS Building’s grade two listing, the University is now in a position to offer it up as relief space to students. We expect URS to be available until at least August 2018.

RUSU are supportive of the move as it helps provide a suitable environment for work and study in the wake of such a major project. Ben Cooper, RUSU President, said:

“RUSU is committed to campaigning for more study space and better facilities for students on campus. We highlighted that the University must do everything it can to mitigate issues such as noise from the building work and access to books, especially for students currently studying here.

RUSU believes that this move of study space to URS is a good option and will result in less overall problems for students to face. It means that some of the noise problems will be reduced and there will be adequate study space in the busy periods whilst the Library refurbishment is being completed.”

The University is working hard to implement these plans ready for the 2017 Quiet Period. Logistics are still being finalised – we will share final plans as soon as possible. If the move is at risk of affecting the exam period it will be postponed until after exams have finished.

Don’t forget that as well as the URS Building, there are many additional alternative study spaces around campus – a full list is available online and our Free Room Finder helps identify available rooms on a daily basis. For more details of additional study space available on campus, project benefits and the latest news, please visit the Library Refurbishment Project webpage.

Rachel Redrup
for University Communications