Book moves to 4th Floor complete

As of 18 February the latest round of book moves are complete. All of the books and other materials from the 2nd Floor have been moved to the 4th Floor so that work can start on refurbishing the 2nd Floor.

Where are items now located?

3rd Floor

  • 100s – philosophy, psychology
  • 200s – religion
  • 400s – languages, linguistics
  • 500s – science
  • 600s – technology, business, typography
  • 700s – arts
  • Oversize MF 000-700
  • European Documentation Centre (EDC)
  • Music CDs
  • Teaching Practice Collection

4th Floor

  • 000s – computer science
  • 300s – social sciences, law
  • 800s – literature
  • 900s – history, geography, archaeology
  • Oversize MF 800-900
  • Journals in all subjects
  • Maps

Need help finding something?

If you need help locating an item or subject in the new arrangement please ask at the Information Desks.

More information

Keep up to date with the latest study space and Library refurbishment news on our Library refurbishment webpage.

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian

Getting help with your dissertation – info tip

A shelf of books and some lightsNo matter how many essays you’ve written, working on a dissertation or research project can be overwhelming. They can involve lots of new skills from deciding on research questions through to those tricky final citations.

Whatever stage you are at, there is lots of help available from the Library and Study Advice team!

Starting out: Search strategies and finding information

It can be a little daunting starting such a big project so you might want to start with the Study Advice guide on dissertations and major projects or their video on defining your research question.

Once you have sorted your research questions you will need to start researching your topic. Look at the Library subject guide for your department to find key databases in your area. There is also a guide to doing a literature search, the LibLearn tutorials on Blackboard, or you could watch our videos on literature searching if you would like a break from reading!

If you are struggling to find the information that you need then you can contact the Liaison Librarian for your subject.

railroad tracksStaying on track

Once you have started your research the Study Advice team have some resources to help you keep going. If you are trying to tackle the literature you have found, it might be a good idea to watch their videos on reading academic texts and critical notetaking.

With large projects like dissertations it is easy to feel like you have lots of time left only to find the deadline creeping up on you. When you are trying to balance your dissertation with lectures, other coursework and revision it is easy to fall behind so take a look at the Study Advice video on managing your time to get some tips.

Dissertations and research projects can also be harder to structure than a normal essay due to their size. This Study Advice video on structuring your dissertation has some helpful suggestions to get you started.

Writing up and referencing

When you have a structure in place you will be ready to start writing up. If this seems a little overwhelming take a look at the Study Advice guidance on writing up your dissertation.

As it is a longer piece of writing than you are likely to have written before it is a good idea not to leave your referencing until the last minute – you don’t want to lose precious marks because you ran out of time to format your bibliography! Luckily there is software freely available to help speed this process up. We offer support for EndNote online and Mendeley, which both help to gather your references and automatically create bibliographies. You can check our guidance page to get started or sign up for a workshop.

If you choose to add your citations manually, and are not sure how to reference a particular resource or would like a refresher, there is lots of guidance on the Citing References guide. But don’t forget to check your student handbook for details of the referencing style required by your department.

When you’re finished, you’ll need to get your dissertation printed and bound – the University’s recommended provider is Hollingworth & Moss.

Further help

If you would like more information you can contact your Liaison Librarian or the Study Advice team.

Good luck with your research!

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Dr Kim Shahabudin, Study Adviser.

Library refurbishment: #UoRStudySpace Assistants

three people ditting on soft chairs

Look out for new #UoRStudySpace Assistants to help you find space in the Library@URS, Library or some alternative campus buildings.

We are pleased to announce the University has funded new Study Space Assistants, now in place to advise students on study places available in the Library, and some other campus buildings, during the final months of the Library refurbishment.

Operating term time Mondays to Fridays 11:00-17:00, they’ll check study space capacities in the Library and Library@URS, and other nearby buildings, such as Edith Morley and Palmer, to let you know where there are free study spaces. They will also support the Library team to implement our ‘anti-desk hogging policy’. Look out for assistants in person, and for their Library social media updates using the hashtag #UoRstudyspace (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter).

Library's 'Looking for study space?' card in red and greyAs a reminder, our anti-desk hogging policy means that leaving your belongings (but no valuables!) for less than an hour while you borrow a book or get refreshments for example is not a problem. However, Study Space Assistants will be placing warning cards on any unattended desks wrongly ‘reserved’ for longer than an hour and directing other students to use them.

Library buildings

During term-time, Library@URS provides quiet study space 24 hours a day. The Ground and 1st Floors of the Library building can also be used for study during term-time 09:00-22:00 daily, but please remember that construction continues until autumn 2019, so there will be noise associated with this. Check the Library opening hours page for full details.

Alternative study space

Student Services blog highlights extra study areas in Edith Morley (near Support Centre + SAIL Away upstairs), Palmer building (foyer), Chemistry building (lobby areas) and some halls of residence to increase opportunity during the Library refurbishment.

Find out where to study across campus at www.reading.ac.uk/study-space.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator with University Communications

 

Play fair and share in the Library

Male students reading books

Help make the Library work effectively by respecting everyone’s right to resources and space. Just a minute checking when your Library loans are due back or clearing a desk space for others can help make this term a success for everyone.

Here’s some simple suggestions on how to keep on top of your Library account, save time and money, help your friends, and provide a pleasant and productive working environment for all:

 

  • Return Library items on time

Avoid fines and help fellow users access the material they need. Make use of the e-receipts function on the Library’s new Self-Service machines to keep track of those important due dates!

 

  • Keep up to date with your account

Remember to check your University email to keep updated with any reminders the Library sends you – including new due dates for recalled items!

 

  • Don’t hog study spaces with your belongings

Please free up study spaces for other users when you are leaving the area for a substantial time. This allows other users the chance to utilise out study areas and keeps your valuables safe.

 

Check out our ‘Using the Library’ and ‘Policies and Rules’ pages for more information.

 

Matthew Pearson, Library User Services

Book moves continue: 11 February

On Monday 21 January, books began moving from the 2nd Floor to the newly reopened 4th Floor.

This week

This week, the remaining large books (000s, 300s and 800s), oversize books and journals will be moving from the 2nd to the 4th Floor. So if you’re looking for books about computer science, social science, law or literature, or journals on any subject, they may have moved. Look out for signs on the shelves to point you in the right direction.

Please ask our friendly Library staff for help at the Information Desks or Ground Floor Help Point if you get stuck. The Library catalogue will be updated to reflect the new locations, usually within a day.

Last week

Last week moves were completed on the normal size 300s. These joined the normal size 000s, 800s and 900s on the 4th Floor.

More information

You can read more about the book moves here. We’ll also provide weekly updates on what is moving via this blog, Twitter (@UniRdg_Library) and Facebook (@universityofreadinglibrary).

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian

Try out LION – a new literature resource

LionWe have trial access to Literature Online (LION) until the 30th April. This trial is available on- and off-campus.

Literature Online (LION) contains the full text of more than 350,000 works of poetry, drama and prose stretching back to the eighth century and through to the present day, including:

  • 340,000 poems by poets such as Angelou, Auden, Byron, Chaucer, Dickinson, Heaney, Hughes, Pound, Sidney and Whitman.
  • 25,000 new rare and hard to find works from the romantic period.
  • 6,000 works of English and American drama from the late 13th century to the early 20th century, including works by Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Dunbar, Sheridan, Wilde and Synge.
  • 3,250 works of prose from 1500 to the early 20th century by authors such as Austen, Dickens, Dostoyevsky, Hawthorne, Melville, Woolf and Zola.
  • 900 videos featuring poets reading their own and others’ works and dramatic audio recordings of all of Shakespeare’s plays in the renowned Arkangel Shakespeare series.

LION also contains a library of criticism and reference works, covering contemporary scholarship in a wide variety of fields from literature studies to cultural studies and theatre studies as well as critical theory, philosophy, feminist studies, folklore and rhetoric.

Help us to decide

Please send your comments on this resource to Kim Coles, Liaison Librarian for English Literature and Film, Theatre and Television – k.coles@reading.ac.uk.

Lindsay Warwick, E-resources Team

Book moves continue: 4 February

On Monday 21 January, books began moving from the 2nd Floor to the newly reopened 4th Floor.

This week

This week, Call Numbers in the 300s will be moving from the 2nd to the 4th Floor. So if you’re looking for books about social science or law, they may have moved. Look out for signs on the shelves to point you in the right direction.

Our 2nd Floor Information Desk will also be moving this week to the 4th Floor, with the 3rd Floor Information Desk remaining in place. Please ask our friendly Library staff for help at the Information Desks or Ground Floor Help Point if you get stuck. The Library catalogue will be updated to reflect the new locations, usually within a day.

Last week

Last week moves were completed on the normal size 000s and 800s. They have now joined the 900s on the 4th Floor.  If you’re looking for books on computer science, literature, history, geography or archaeology, these will now be on the 4th Floor.

More information

You can read more about the book moves here. We’ll also provide weekly updates on what is moving via this blog, Twitter (@UniRdg_Library) and Facebook (@universityofreadinglibrary).

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian

New e-resource – Stream films with Kanopy

Two film reels side by side.We now have access to Kanopy!

Kanopy is an online streaming platform, providing access to thousands of films from over 800 film makers. Whether you’re a Film student or an Historian, you will find a range of films related to the arts & humanities – including documentaries, Hollywood cinema, early film, a range of genres, and The Criterion Collection.

Access is provided by the Library, so it is free for you to access, and you can stream films on-campus and off-campus. Use the Browse feature to search by subject or genre, or the search bar at the top of the page to look for a film by title.

Sophie Dorman, E-resources Team

LGBT History Month – Discover and diversify our Library collections

New Library research guide

LGBT+ is an area of research which can cover a wide range of academic disciplines. In celebration of February’s LGBT History Month, the Library has introduced a new online guide to support research into LGBT+-related topics. The guide takes the same format as our subject guides but focuses on the range of materials available from the Library and Special Collections relating to LGBT+ topics.

It has been created, in consultation with staff and student representatives, to help you find some of the key resources the Library can provide in this area, as well as point you towards other useful online resources, libraries and archives.

We’d love to hear your feedback on our new guide, so let us know what you think!

Suggest resources to help diversify our collections

You can also help us to diversify the Library’s collections by putting forward your suggestions for Library materials to help support a more diverse curriculum.

If you would like to suggest other items for the Library, please complete our regular book suggestion form.

Examples of material recently purchased from this fund include:

You can see all the Diversity fund titles purchased in current and previous academic years on our dedicated Library Diversity fund reading lists

Kerry Webb, Associate Director (Academic Liaison and Support)

Stay search-savvy: evaluating online information – info tip

Lots of question marks - two are brightly-colouredWhen you’re searching online for information for your assignments, you’ll find a wealth of information – but how do you know what you can trust? What’s reliable enough to be included in your academic work?

Top 5 tips for evaluating online information

1. Ask questions

Before quoting information that you find, ask yourself the following questions:

Authority: is the author of the page/site a subject expert, or a trustworthy organisation?

Accuracy and reliability: is the information fact or opinion? Is it influenced by an agenda, or providing only one point of view? Is the spelling and grammar correct?

Currency: is the page and its information up to date, and updated regularly?

Audience: who is the information aimed at? Schoolchildren, university students, medical professionals – and is this the right level for the work that you are doing?

Feel: does the site look well-maintained and well-structured?

 

2. Think about trying a different source

A general Google search returns all sorts of information, some of it personal to you, and for your academic work you’ll want to use more scholarly, academic research rather than personalised searching. Google Scholar can be used to narrow your general search to more academic sources. To make the most of Google Scholar you can adjust the settings to show links to items available through the Library. For instructions and further information, have a look at our guide to accessing Google Scholar, or Google’s own search tips.

 

3. Make the most of the Library resources

Be aware that Google Scholar has limited reach online, and might have patchy coverage of the articles or topics you’re interested in! You don’t want to miss information, so use the Library’s Summon discovery service and subject databases – your subject guide includes a list of selected reliable, authoritative databases and website for your subject.

 

4. Evaluate everything!

You should always be evaluating your sources – use the criteria above to consider how appropriate the information you find is to your assignment. Apply the criteria above to general online searching, and on academic databases as well.

 

5. Still not sure? Ask for help

You can ask your subject liaison librarian for guidance on finding good quality resources for your study and research.

Watch the Study Advice tutorial on evaluating your sources – this is great if you’re new to academic study and aren’t sure which sources of information are best placed to include in your academic work.

One thing to take away from this post: you’ll find all of this guidance on the Library’s online guide to evaluating websites, bookmark this page and read it again!

This is one of a series of tips designed to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Kim Coles, Liaison Team Manager.

 

Overwhelmed by reading? – info tip

Two students reading and studyingIf your resolution this term is to be more efficient when studying, a good area to focus on is your reading and note-making. Independent reading and taking notes are likely to make up a large part of your study time at university, so a few small adaptations to your reading strategies could potentially save you a lot of time over the term.

Reading with a purpose

The Study Advice team has a guide on managing academic reading which includes ideas on how to select material, deciding how much to read, and reading techniques. We also have a brief video tutorial on reading academic texts that introduces the kind of reading needed for academic work and appropriate strategies.

To get started, try this simple three-step plan to make your reading more active and targeted:

 1. Understand the purpose for your reading:

2. Think about what you need to find out:

Ask yourself what you already know about the topic, from previous lectures, seminars or wider knowledge. Use this to identify your gaps and what you need to find out – it can be useful to phrase this as a series of questions so you can then search for answers to those questions.

3. Identify where you can find this information:

Your reading list is often a helpful place to start – the Library has a guide to understanding your reading list. But to get the best marks you will most likely need to go beyond your reading list – see the Library guide on doing your literature search for information on where to look, effective search tips, finding the items you need. For targeted resources and more advice on finding information in your subject, take a look at your subject resources pages or contact your subject liaison librarian.

An open notebook and pensNote this!

Efficient reading goes hand-in-hand with good note-making, so if you feel you are being slowed down by taking too many, or too few notes, have a look at our guide to effective note-taking and our video tutorial on critical note-taking.

The secret is not trying to capture everything you’ve read (or you’ll just end up with more notes than there are pages in the book itself!) but to keep good records so you know where to find the information again when you need it. Watch this short video tutorial on finding bibliographical details you need for note-making and referencing. If you find it hard to keep track of your references, consider using reference management software, such as EndNote.

Spending too long reading?

Reading is a potentially open-ended task – there is always one more book or journal article in the Library that you could read. If you feel your reading is taking too long, have a look at the Study Advice guides on managing your time and our video tutorial on how to make more hours in the day

If you find it difficult to focus on your reading, list the things that distract you and take steps to deal with these distractions. For example, disable pop-up notifications on your phone if you know social media can easily draw your attention away from your reading. Another helpful strategy is to think about the time of day when you are most focused and productive, and use your best thinking time to tackle the most difficult texts.

Putting limits around your reading time and stopping it from becoming an endless task can also improve your efficiency and your motivation! Make an estimate of how much time you need to do your reading, break your reading down into manageable chunks, and schedule it into a weekly study timetable. For more advice on how to make one, watch our video tutorial on making a study timetable.

Need more help?

If you need more advice on how to manage your reading and improve your note-taking techniques, contact the Study Advice team to book an appointment.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Dr Michelle Reid, Study Adviser.

Welcome Back Week in the Library

Welcome Back Week starts on Monday 21 January and we’re getting involved at the Library!

University Services Fair

The Library team will have a stand at the University Services Fair in RUSU Upper 3Sixty on Monday and Tuesday next week. Come and chat with our friendly staff if you have an questions about the Library.

You can also have a go at our Summon Speed Search! It only takes a couple of minutes and you’ll be in with the chance of winning a prize. Can you make it to the top of our leaderboard? Visit our stand to see if you can win.

Library tours

If you’ve not yet had a chance to look around the Library, come along to one of our tours which are running every day next week. Tours start at 13:10 and will last 20-30 minutes. No need to book – just turn up at the Library and meet by our display in the foyer. We’ll guide you round the building and tell you everything you need to know about using the Library. If you’re a Postgraduate student, come along to our Wednesday tour!

More information

We’ll be posting about what we’re up to throughout the week so check Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for further updates.

As always, you can also ask for help at an Information Desk. Go to the URS Ground Floor Information Desk for general enquiries. Go to the Library Building, 2nd or 3rd Floor Desks for help finding books.

Katie Winter, Trainee Liaison Librarian