Library systems upgrades: 3-4 and 17-18 July

Sam Tyler grins whilst holding travel mug up to the camera

Systems Manager, Sam Tyler, will be celebrating with fizzy pop in his branded Library travel mug once Library systems are all successfully updated in July.

This summer the Library is upgrading its Library Management System in order to gain a more robust system and maintain its security. However, please be aware that there may be some disruption to Library services whilst we are setting this up on Monday 3 to Tuesday 4 July and Monday 17 to Tuesday 18 July 2017.

If you plan to use the Library on these days, either in person or online, please check our University Library News blog nearer the time to see how the system upgrade could affect you. The Library will remain open throughout, as will most of our systems’ functionality.

We hope that you have a great summer and are looking forward to a new upgrades as much as we are!

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Sam Tyler, Library Systems Manager

Print journals move as Library refurb progresses

blue crates on floor beside half-filled shelves of print journalsOur Library Refurbishment Project moved into another phase as we shifted around various print materials on the Library Building’s 2nd, 3rd and 4th Floors. Throughout the Project, you will always be able to access print books here, but they will move location as work is carried out on different floors. We are creating space for books by moving print journals off site.

If you have any difficulty locating anything during the moves, please ask Library staff for help at the 2nd or 4th Floor Information Desks.

Journals move progress

Young man empties library materials from shelves into blue boxes, shelves recede into distance either side of him.We began to move print journals from the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Floors off-site from the week of 22 May 2017 and completed the process by 27 June. A few print journals were identified as essential for study and teaching. Exceptionally, these remain in the Library Building at the back of the 4th Floor, next to legislation and European Documentation Centre (EDC) material, along with all new issues of current titles.

Using journals

Library staff have planned ahead to reduce the impact moving print issues might have had for those using journals:

More informationEmpty shelves reced into distance. Crates in centre. Lone figure pushes away more crates

See our other post about arts and humanities books moving from the 3rd to the 2nd and 4th Floors. Find out more about the Library’s major £40 million refurbishment on the Library Refurbishment Project webpage (see FAQ 3 and 6 regarding journals) or email us at library@reading.ac.uk.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

 

Finding e-journals made easy with BrowZine – info tip

BrowZine logoWe provide you with access to thousands of journals, but how do you find out what’s available? You can search the Library catalogue, Enterprise, but if you’re just after journals, BrowZine is a good starting point. You can also use it to create your own collection of your favourite titles, and be notified when the latest issues become available.

Browse or search

You can browse for your subject to identify useful titles. Alternatively, search for a subject, or search for a specific journal by title, subject or ISSN.

The example below shows browsing Philosophy and Religion for Ethics/Bioethics related titles.

Browsing BrowZine for titles in Philosophy and specifically Ethics, showing a display of journal covers

Click on a title to see the contents of the latest issue, and to access earlier volumes. Clicking on a specific article will take you to the full-text on the publisher’s website, which you can then print or save.

Saving favourite journals & articles

When viewing journals on BrowZine you can create your own bookshelf of your favourite titles. Just click on ‘Add to my bookshelf’ under the journal title. You’ll need to login to do this. Simply sign up for an account if you haven’t already got one.

Once a journal is added to your bookshelf you’ll see notifications next to each title of the number of unread articles in that journal, helping you to keep track of the ones you’ve reviewed. For a quick intro on using the bookshelf to keep up-to-date watch this short video on staying current with Browzine.

You can also save details of useful articles using the ‘Add to my articles’ option.

Both journals and articles can be put into topic groupings of your own choice.

Accessing BrowZine

BrowZine can be used on your computer, or you can download the app for use on an Android or Apple device.

Getting help

Explore these videos which cover using BrowZine on the web or via the app. Alternatively, contact your subject liaison librarian for advice.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding information

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager and Liaison Librarian (English Language and Applied Linguistics & Food and Nutritional Sciences).

 

Summer vacation loans are landing!

AeroplanesFrom Thursday 1 June to Tuesday 5 September the standard loan period for undergraduate and taught postgraduate students is extended until Tuesday 26 September or until the end of your course, whichever is earlier. Standard loan periods for other Library borrowers remain unchanged.

All other loan periods and fines for late return remain the same! So please take care when borrowing 7-day loans, Course Collection items and journals. Make sure you check your University account regularly for due dates.

Remember

  • Standard loans – yours all summer if you are an undergraduate or Masters student!
  • 7-day loans – remain the same so keep renewing! If an item cannot be renewed or is recalled, be prepared to post it back to us.
  • Course Collection items and journals – remain the same so keep checking your account!
  • Fines – pay online via the Campus Card Portal or call us.

Lucy Shott, Library User Services

Help stop desk hogging in Library@URS

Library's 'Looking for study space?' card in red and greyAlthough your study space has moved into the URS Building, we all still think it unfair for students to try to reserve desks by leaving their belongings behind.

If this affects you, please go to either the URS Reception desk by the main entrance or the URS Information Desk next to the Course Collection on the ground floor and ask Library staff for support. We have warning cards you can place on unattended stuff.

Put the belongings to one side and sit down. If the owner returns within the hour, they are entitled to the space back. If not, you can sit there instead. Also ask staff to help explain if anyone returning after an hour complains.

Where unattended stuff hasn’t been moved overnight, staff will remove it to URS Reception. If it is not claimed by the next morning, it will be taken to Palmer Reception, the centre for all lost property in the University  (open in exam-time Monday to Friday, 13:00-14:00 only).

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator for
Sue Egleton, Head of Systems and User Services.

Noisy chat in Library@URS? Text us!

Lower part of face with forefinger placed to lipsAre others chatting too noisily in the Library’s URS Building? Alert us by text, without identifying yourself to others or leaving your seat!

First check your URS study area really is designated as ‘quiet’ or ‘silent’, or that noise in a ‘group study area’ is excessive. If it is, text:

  • NOISYCHAT‘ and your location to 07796 300114 
  • eg NOISYCHAT 2n19 Silent Study.

We’ll come and investigate. We support your right to to work quietly, as protected by Library Rule 13.

For more information, and a list of URS Building locations, see our Noise in the Library webpage.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator
for Robin Hunter, Facilities Manager

 

Savvy searching on the Internet – info tip

Laptop and a bookThe Internet contains huge amounts of information, but do you know which sites are most reliable to use in your academic assignments?

Read on to learn more about internet sources for academic study.

Online reference sources

Reference materials such as dictionaries and encyclopedias are especially useful when you are looking for short introductions to a topic in order to start work on your assignment and they often point to useful books or articles on the subject that you can use for further reading.

General online reference sources

Although Wikipedia is one of the most popular online reference sites you should not cite it in your essays.  Anyone can add or edit pages meaning that articles are not necessarily written by experts; they may be of poor quality or contain errors.

There are more reliable and authoritative general reference sources available, including the following, which the Library subscribes to:

  • Britannica Online– the leading general reference title, peer-reviewed with entries written by experts in their field. Also available in printed format at the Library.
  • Credo Reference – Search over 250 published reference titles. Find longer articles and web pages too.
  • Oxford Reference – high quality, ‘peer-reviewed’ sources from Oxford University Press.

Reference sources for specific subjects

You can also find printed or online reference works that are specific to your subject area. For a list of recommended titles, consult the ‘Dictionaries & encyclopedias’ tab of your Subject guide. In this guide, you will also find a list of reliable, authoritative websites for your subject area.

Alternatively, you can ask your subject liaison librarian, or a member of staff working at a Library Information Desk, to recommend good quality dictionaries for you.

Google scholar

Google Scholar is the academic version of Google.  It allows you to search for scholarly literature from a variety of online resources.  However, be aware that your search results will also include material that the Library does not subscribe to, so you may not be able to access everything you find.

google scholarTo make the most of Google Scholar you might like to adjust the settings so that it displays links to the University of Reading Library. This lets you quickly access material that the Library subscribes to from your results list. Simply click on Settings then Library links to set this up. For full instructions and further information, have a look at our guide to accessing Google Scholar and some useful features of the search engine.

Google Scholar is a useful tool but remember that it only searches a small proportion of publications, so use it alongside other sources for a comprehensive literature search. Also, you should still evaluate the sources that you find for reliability, currency and authority.

Evaluating Internet Resources: Authority, Accuracy, Currency

Phone and books on a deskThere are many different electronic resources available on the Internet, and they are all of varying quality so whether you are looking at reference materials, websites or blogs, make sure you properly evaluate their reliability before you use them in your assignments.

To help you do this there is a Library guide and Study Advice video tutorial on evaluating websites. These contain useful tips to help you judge the accuracy and reliability of your search results, as well as providing some alternatives that are guaranteed to give you good references.

Citing Websites

Once you have found an appropriate website for your research make sure that you reference it correctly. There is guidance on how to do this in the Citing References LibGuide.

This is one of a series of tips to help save you time and effort finding or using information

This tip was written by, Natalie Guest, Liaison Librarian for Biological Sciences and Document Delivery Co-ordinator, and Louise Cowan, Trainee Liaison Librarian for Classics and Philosophy.

Library refurbishment works: 5-22 May

Image of refurbished University Library surrounded by seating, trees and hedges.Between 5– 22 May the following work is expected to be carried out inside the Library building:

  • Mechanical and electrical works will carry on across various points throughout the building.
  • Ground, 1st and 3rd Floors work will continue and there may be concentrated activity around the staircase enclosed behind the white hoardings.

Study space across campus

Including the study space inside the URS Building, there are approximately 1,700 spaces available for study on campus (subject to teaching timetabling and departmental use).

Stay up-to-date

Keep checking the Library blog for the latest news and updates.

See our dedicated URS Building page for details of Library services here, maps and opening times.

All of the above can be easily accessed through our Library refurbishment project page: www.reading.ac.uk/library/refurb.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator
for UoR Communications

 

Study space at Whiteknights this Bank Holiday weekend

For students looking to study on Whiteknights campus this weekend, Saturday 29 April, Sunday 30 April and Monday 1 May:

  • Study space in the URS Building will be open 24-hours (except Saturday night). Please speak to Library staff if you need help finding a space.
  • The Library Building is also open 09:00-22:00 for access to books.
  • RUSU’s The Study will also be open 08:00-21:00 on these days.
  • If you want access to a computer, you can access 24-hour labs in other buildings with your Campus Card:
    • Agriculture (GL20) – 30 PCs
    • Meteorology (GL68) – 20 PCs
    • Palmer (G09) – 20 PCs

For further information about weekday alternative study spaces, check out the ‘FIND STUDY SPACE BEYOND THE LIBRARY’ section on the Library Refurbishment Project page

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator

Leavers! Settle up before you go

It will soon be time to close one account… and maybe open another?

Settle up before you go!

If you are graduating this summer then please don’t forget to return your loans and clear your account before you go. If you have any outstanding fines or bills you can pay online via the Campus Card Portal or at the Ground Floor Information Desk now situated in the URS Building.

Before you leave don’t forget to return:

  • Standard loan, 7-day loan and journal items to the Library Building
  • Course Collection items to the URS Building

Money left on your card?

Save the pennies and avoid having any leftover money on your Campus Card at the end of your course. When you top-up your card via the Campus Card Portal there is now no minimum amount you have to spend. This means you can top-up exactly what you need to see you through to the end of term!

Membership after you graduate

If you are interested in borrowing from the University Library after you graduate, annual Library membership is half-price at £45! Alternatively, if you are beginning a new course at UoR next session you can apply for membership over the summer for a reduced charge of £20. Registrations for membership can be made at the Ground Floor Information Desk in the URS Building.

Lucy Shott, Library User Services

Citing references made easy with EndNote Web – info tip

Books, glasses and laptopAre you starting your dissertation? Do you lack confidence citing references in your work? Have you been marked down for inconsistencies in your bibliography?

EndNote Web can help!

What is EndNote Web?

EndNote Web is an online service you can use to:

  • store and organise useful references you find whilst researching topics
  • insert references in your Word document
  • automatically build and format your bibliography in a style of your choosing

It is designed for use by undergraduates and Masters students as it is a cut-down version of the Desktop EndNote program used by researchers (which is available on all PCs on campus).

How do I use it?

EndNote Web is freely available, but University members can access an enhanced version as part of the Library’s subscription to the Web of Science database. It can be used on a PC or a Mac.

Just log in to the Web of Science and sign up for an account. Once registered you can use it both on- and off-campus.

How do I get references into my EndNote Web library?

You can type in details of useful books and articles you have found. However, the quickest and most accurate methods are to export references from Library databases or use the Online search facility from within EndNote Web.

Direct export

This method is available on the Web of Science and all of the Ebsco databases (including Business Source Complete). Just search the database for your topic and save/export to EndNote Web.

Import

For many other databases it is easy to save a file of references and then Import them into EndNote Web. For more information on the method you will need to use for your favourite database take a look at our page about the database, this will include details of the Import option you need to select as part of the process. If you need advice, contact your subject liaison librarian.

Online search

The Online search facility within EndNote Web is particularly useful for searching library catalogues, and you can use it to get book references from our catalogue into your library.

Writing your essay or dissertation

Once you have references in your EndNote Web library you can insert them into your Word document as you write your essay or dissertation. Just download the Cite While You Write toolbar and use it in Word to search your library for the reference you want to insert and it will automatically put the citation in the text and build the bibliography at the end of your document.

EndNote Web Cite While You Write toolbar

You can select from a number of referencing styles (such as Numbered, APA, MHRA) or use the customised Harvard style which matches the style required by many of the science and life science departments here at Reading. Once you select a style, all of your citations and references will be reformatted automatically.

Getting help

Take a look at our Guide to getting starting with EndNote Web (PDF) will take you through all the steps involved in creating your EndNote Web account, getting references into your library and using it with Word to write your essays or dissertation. Or View videos on using EndNote Web produced by Thomson Reuters (suppliers of EndNote Web).

Alternatively, contact your subject liaison librarian for individual help and support.

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding information

This tip was written by Jackie Skinner, Library Web Manager and Liaison Librarian (English Language and Applied Linguistics & Food and Nutritional Sciences).

Library study space now located in URS Building

blue sofas and tables and chairs

One of the new group study rooms relocated to the URS Building.

Much of the study furniture from the Library has relocated to the URS Building. It now provides students with a contemporary and versatile space to work and study – including around 800 spaces (145 computers), work areas for collaborative, quiet and silent study, and several key facilities from the Library Building.

Including URS, students can now access over 1,700 study spaces across our Whiteknights and London Road campuses.

URS Building key features

  • Library Information Desk: For general and registration enquiries, located on the Ground Floor.
  • Study space: A variety of study areas – group, quiet and silent – are available on the Ground and 2nd Floors.
  • Study Advice and Maths Support: Get help with study skills and maths on the Ground Floor.
  • Course Collection: Find key texts for your modules in the Course Collection on the Ground Floor.  Holds are also available to collect here.
  • IT Service Desk and facilities: PCs and printing facilities are available on the Ground Floor.  If you need help, just ask at the IT Service Desk there.
  • Café Libro: The Library’s popular café is located on the 2nd Floor of the URS Building.
  • Opening Hours: The URS Building will adopt the 24 hour opening during term (except closing 21:00 Saturday to 08:30 Sunday) as is currently the case in the Library.

Take a look at the map and floor directory to see what’s been moved where.

Preparation of space

Furniture being moved form outside the Library, passing hoardings

Vitra staff moved and reassembled our modern study furniture in URS

The relocation was carried out over the Easter vacation – during this time, several new improvements were made to the URS Building in order to make its study environment as welcoming as possible:

  • Rooms have been configured to meet a wide range of study needs – you’ll find individual study booths, group areas, quiet study spaces and more.
  • We have improved several of the building’s existing features in order to make it a better place to study – new lights have been fitted to make studying easier, and south-facing windows on the Second Floor have been tinted to deflect heat.
  • We have balanced creating a maximum number of spaces with ensuring that students can study in comfort and safety. Health & Safety guidelines recommend that URS holds a maximum capacity of 800 students.
  • Our job as a University is to provide students with comfortable spaces to study, and we believe that URS will prove to be a popular home to Library study space until summer 2018, when facilities will move back into the Library Building.

Why has the space moved?

Relocating study space and facilities from one to building to another posed several benefits.

Moving study space from the Library into URS will provide a quieter environment for study while still being close enough to borrow and use materials. It also means we can carry out more work inside the Library than previously planned, and so will complete the refurbishment around six months earlier.

With URS in such close proximity to the Library, you won’t have far to take the materials you’ve just borrowed from the original Library building for studying.

Library Building key features

The Library remains open for use – inside you will still find:

  • Printed materials: All printed material (other than Course Collection) will remain inside the Library for borrowing or reference.
  • Library staff: Although Library staff are now based in URS, they will still offer a Help Point by the Library entrance and Information Desks on the 2nd and 4th Floors.
  • Opening Hours: The Library Building will open 09:00-22:00 seven days per week during term time. URS will be open 24/6+ during term time (closed Saturday nights).

Construction work will continue in the Library Building whilst we strive to complete the project as soon as possible, so you may experience considerable noise whilst using this building.

Alternative study space across campus

Including URS, there are approximately 1,700 spaces to study on campus (subject to teaching timetabling and departmental use).

Keep in touch

While we have taken great care to ensure that URS meets your needs, we appreciate that there may be more to improve over the coming weeks. Please pass on any feedback or comments to library@reading.ac.uk.

Further information

A dedicated URS Building page has been created to help clarify exactly what has moved from the Library. It will be kept updated by our Library team, who will also share regular news and updates via the Library blog. The Library opening hours page lists opening times for both the Library and URS buildings.

Further details of the Library’s major £40 million refurbishment can be found on our Library Refurbishment Project webpage: www.reading.ac.uk/library/refurb.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator
for University Communications