Leavers! Settle up before you go

Graduattion2If you are graduating this summer then please don’t forget to return your loans and clear your account before you go. If you have any outstanding fines or bills you can now pay online as well as at the Library.

Membership after you graduate

If you are interested in borrowing from the University Library after you graduate, annual Library membership is half-price at £45! Alternatively, if you are beginning a new course at UoR next session you can apply for membership over the summer for a reduced charge of £20.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

Alternative UoR study space

Palmer and Carrington Buildings at night

Are you a UoR student? Whilst Library study areas may be your favourite revision space, you have alternatives on campus. Try:

Visitors, please note!

The above facilities are reserved for University members only. Library entry is also restricted during our students’ exam period.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

 

Illustrate and illuminate your work – add an image! – info tip

The Library has a number of sources of copyright-cleared images which you can use in your assignments and University work. Why not explore some of the resources listed below in order to enrich your projects with illuminating images?

Images can be a persuasive addition to your argument, but should be considered critically as with any source. Remember to reference images appropriately, giving credit to the original source.

Finding images

You can access the following databases through the Library website, or follow the links below.

Britannica image web pic 1

Britannica Image Quest – includes over 2.7 million images from various collections including National Geographic, Getty Images, National History Museum and more.

 

 

 

 

Mediahub web pic 1

MediaHub – includes still images, video and audio covering all subjects, selected especially for use in Higher Education. MediaHub also acts as a portal to many other online image collections and allows you to search across all the collections with one click!

 

 

There are lots of other databases that provide images, or include both text and images but allow you to search for images only. See what’s available on our Image and sound page.

Image search engines

CC logoThere is also a wealth of images available online, some of which are made available for non-commercial use in project work and presentations. These are labelled as Creative Commons images.

You can find these by using a number of search engines and photo-sharing websites, including Xpert search and attribution. Xpert searches Creative Commons licensed material and allows you to download the image with the appropriate attribution and licence details integrated – easy!

For further guidance on using images legally, see the University’s advice on copyright

University image collections

The University has several image collections students can use to improve their work. Special Collections have many images of the items in their collections on their website which can be used in unpublished and non-commercial works. Special Collections covers many areas including Samuel Beckett, early English coins, early anatomy books and publishers’ archives. Please contact them if you want to know more about using these images.

Students can also take advantage of the Visual Resource Database (VRD) which stores high quality images of works of art and architecture that range in date from antiquity to modern times. These images can be downloaded, but can be used only for purposes of study – for example in student presentations and essays. Students from any subject area are welcome to use the VRD which is based in the HUMSS building in room G27J – if you wish to do so please contact Diana Reynolds

Need further advice?

For more guidance contact your subject liaison librarian

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Natalie Guest, Multimedia Manager.

Restricted entry for exam-time

Rows of small tables and chairs set out for examsFrom now until Friday 12 June, Library space is reserved for University Campus and Library Card holders overnight and all weekend (Monday to Thursday, 17:00 – 08:00; Friday 17:00 – Monday 08:00).  This is to prevent disruption to our own revising students from non-University members, right until their last exam is over.

We operate a ‘no card, no access policy’ and reserve the right to refuse access to anyone, including University members, who cannot identify themselves adequately.

HOW TO GET IN – CARD-HOLDERS

University of Reading Campus Card-holders and Library Card holders are welcome at all times. However, during restricted times, the revolving door will be locked, so please enter by the right-hand Library door.

  • University members gain automatic entry by placing their Campus Card on the ‘proximity reader’ beside the right-hand door.
  • Library Card holders must show their card to staff to gain entry. Please knock for attention if staff are not right beside the door.

RESTRICTIONS FOR VISITORS

Members of the public without cards are only admitted weekdays 08:00–17:00, 7 April – 12 June 2015. Regrettably, they may not use study spaces here as these are required by our own students revising for exams. Visitors are encouraged to look to their own school, college or public library for study space.

As always, our policy is that children in the Library must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We apologise to visitors unable to use CaféLibro during restricted periods. Please try another outlet on campus or at Christchurch Green.

CAMPUS CARD FAULTY?

Should your University Campus Card fail to open the Library’s front door with the card reader, please ask Campus Card Services to fix the fault via their Campus Card non-residential door access report form or email cardfinance@reading.ac.uk.

Alternative UoR Study space

Remember that UoR students can also use alternative study space provided across campus.

 Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

4,299 new, key e-journals for UoR!

student using e-resources

We’ve just arranged for University of Reading staff and students to access even more e-journals than ever …..  24/7, wherever you are, whether the Library building is open or closed! Happy Easter!

Over the last few months the Library has been negotiating with key publishers to increase subscription access to a much greater range of e-journal content. This allows all our researchers to access a much greater range, quickly and easily.

We are pleased to announce you can access all* journals published by Wiley, Taylor & Francis, Sage, Oxford University Press and Cambridge University Press. This complements our existing individual journal subscriptions, as well as the full range of Elsevier journals available on the ScienceDirect platform. We have also increased the number of titles available via Project Muse, and the number of Annual Reviews we take.

*Wiley Online, Taylor & Francis and Cambridge University Press generally provide access from 1997 onwards; Oxford University Press from 1996 onwards; Sage from 1999 onwards.

Key figures

Previous titles available New titles added Total with publisher
Wiley 232 1358 1590
Taylor & Francis 172 1839 2011
Sage 75 632 707
Oxford University Press 70 215 285
Cambridge University Press 86 255 341
Total 635 4299 4934

How to access e-journals

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator & Paul Johnson, Head of Collections and Space

Develop your research skills! – info tip

Research materialsIf you are carrying out research, be it an undergraduate dissertation or a PhD thesis, there are a variety of resources and services available from the Library to help you.

In addition to the suggestions below, don’t forget that your Department or School has a designated subject liaison librarian, who is happy to offer you further advice about locating information for your research.

Suggested resources

Subject databases

The best way to find articles published on your dissertation or thesis topic is to search subject databases in your subject area. These will give you references to journal articles and other published materials.

Online journals

Use Enterprise, the Library catalogue, to see what online journals we have access to. Remember to search for the journal title, not the article title. Enterprise lists the online versions of journals separately from the print versions, so look for the words [electronic resource] after the journal title. Limit your search results to e-journals by selecting “Online” access and “Journal” format.

Use the Summon Discovery Service to find full-text journal articles and book chapters that you have access to.

If you are using subject databases that display the Search for item at Reading button button, use this to see if we have access to the journal in question.

Use Enterprise to find Reading PhD and MPhil theses related to your subject. Theses are kept in the Library’s Closed Access section and Off-site Store (see below). To locate relevant theses written at other institutions use the sources recommended in our Finding theses guide. The British Library’s EThOS service is free and enables you to download digital theses held on their system and order paper theses for digitisation.

Closed Access and Off-site store

Material which is rarely used but which is still of value to researchers, and University of Reading theses, are kept in the Library’s Closed Access section and Off-site Store. These items have a note in Enterprise saying ‘In Closed Access – available on request’ or ‘Off-site Store – available on request.’ To request these items use the ‘Request Item from Closed Access / Off-site Store’ link in its Enterprise record and complete the online form. Your items will be collected for you by Library staff. For more information see Requesting items from closed access collections using Enterprise.

Keep up to date with published information in your subject by setting up current awareness alerts. For help see the Keeping up-to-date guide.

For items not held here at Reading…

The Inter-library loans service enables you to access journal articles and borrow books that we don’t have in our library stock.

Other libraries

If you are away from Reading over the summer or wish to use another library, University staff and students can access most Higher Education libraries in the UK and Ireland via the SCONUL Access scheme. This free scheme allows all students reference only access. Part-time students, those on placement, taught postgraduates and research postgraduates may also be able to borrow items. To use the scheme, register on the SCONUL Access website.

Further help…

There is a dedicated Researcher web page which gives links to many of the most important sources of information. Alternatively contact your subject liaison librarian who will be happy to help advise you about sources for your research.

 

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Melvin Morbey, Research Support Co-ordinator and Liaison Librarian.

Library heating/ventilation and refurbishment

Hot, cold or just right in the Library? Here are some tips for finding your favourite Library environment, how to ask us for local adjustments and most importantly, news of University investment in the system.

Find your microclimate!

Grey desks with purple dividers and lamps beside windows and book shelvesDifferent people prefer different study areas and temperatures.

  • If you are particularly susceptible to chills from moving air, try to avoid sitting right under vents on the 5th Floor which alternately blow warm and cooler air.
  • If you like it warm, try studying at open tables beside warm radiators, e.g. 3rd Floor, north side (illustrated).
  • Like it bright and hot? If the sun is shining, sit on the south Pepper Lane side in the afternoon or the western Whiteknights House side late afternoon/early evening.
  • We recommend wearing layers to the Library so you can adjust to the day’s and each area’s conditions.

Request an adjustment!

  • Windows can be opened on the Library’s 1st to 4th Floors. Reach lower ones yourself or ask for help with high ones, either at a floor Information Desk Monday-Thursday 09:00-17:00 & Friday 10:00-17:00; or the Ground Floor at other times.
  • Heating and air conditioning is controlled remotely by University Estates and Facilities (E&F) according to heat sensor information. If you feel it is not working correctly, please use our new online heating & ventilation form to tell us exactly when and where you had a problem so we can pass it on.

Library heating and ventilation: challenges and opportunity

The Library heating system is settling down again after full attachment to the new campus heat distribution system. However, the University acknowledges our 50-year-old Library presents challenges to balancing energy efficiency against contemporary consumer demand. Its vast open spaces and single glazed windows are still heated with 196os panels plus an ambient air circulation system and radiators in the 1985 extension. A new but separate 5th Floor heat exchange system blows warm air when sensors register 18°C or cool at 24°C.

Forthcoming major Library refurbishment plans will address not only heating and ventilation systems, but window replacement and external cladding. (Additionally, the lifts, 1st and Ground Floors will be completely redesigned). This ambitious project will span several years, possibly starting this summer. Refurbishment surveying is taking place this March and April. So watch this space!

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator
Robin Hunter, Library Facilities Manager

 

CaféLibro hours Easter/Summer 2015

CafeLibro logo reversed on window, red tree behindCaféLibro will open around Easter and beyond as follows:

  • Spring Term
    until Friday 27 March
    Monday–Friday    08:00–21:00
    Saturday–Sunday  11:00–17:00
  • Early Easter Vacation
    Saturday 28 March to Monday 6 April
    Closed
  • Later Easter Vacation
    Tuesday 7 to Sunday 19 April
    Monday–Friday    08:30–16:00
    Saturday–Sunday  11:00–17:00
  • Summer Term=exam-time extended opening
    Monday 20 April to Friday 12 June
    Monday–Friday    08:00–23:00
    Saturday                   11:00–18:00
    Sunday                      11:00–23:00
  • Summer vacation
    from Monday 15 June
    Monday–Friday    08:30–16:00
    Saturday–Sunday Closed

See the Library website for general Library opening hours.

Alternative catering options

Self-service machines for hot and cold drinks, and snacks are always available at CaféLibro, and you can eat your own food here, even if the staffed cafe is closed.

Alternatively, check out University Catering‘s other campus outlets.

Rachel Redrup, Library Marketing Co-ordinator, for Martin Batt, Catering

Planning your revision – info tip

Boy reading in sunshineEaster’s coming up fast, and you may be still completing assignments for the end of term. Exams might still seem a long way off but they’ll be here before you know it. Now’s a good time to start thinking about your revision – and the Library and Study Advice are here to help.

Working out a schedule
It’s important to have a plan, to make sure you have time to cover all the topics you need to. Avoid making your revision plan too detailed and prescriptive though – you will need to build in time for relaxation, exercise – and the unexpected! See our Study Guide on Planning your revision for more on how to work out your schedule.

Where will you revise?
The Library is many students’ first choice of location for revision. We have dedicated group, quiet and silent study areas so whether you want to work alone or with a group of friends, there will be a suitable place for you. However, the Library can get busy in exam period. So for alternative places to revise on campus, check the list of study spaces.  Wherever you revise, remember to take breaks. We may be open 24 hours but that doesn’t mean you have to work through the night – your brain needs rest and time for processing information.

Finding materials for revision
You will probably start by reading through your lecture notes, and then looking at texts on your reading list. The Library has guidance on finding different types of publication as well as videos that will help you to get the most out of the Library. You should also check the subject resources and guidance for information resources in your topic – much more reliable than ‘just Googling it’.

Making your revision effective
If you can find six minutes Student studying at desks separated by green divider panelsin your busy schedule, you can watch our video tutorial on Effective revision – and save yourself a lot of wasted time. We also have a Study Guide on revision and memory techniques. If you’re taking exams in the UK for the first time, have a look at our information on assessment by examination in UK higher education to give you a clearer idea of how they may differ from what you have done in the past. Remember that the purpose of revision is not to memorise everything you can find about the subject, but to prepare yourself to answer exam questions. Have a look at our video tutorials on exams for guidance on the best way to prepare for different kinds of exams.

Where to get more help
If you have any questions about revising or taking exams at university, you can always make an appointment to meet with a Study Adviser.

 

This is one of a series of tips to help you save time and effort finding or using information.

This tip was written by Kim Shahabudin, Michelle Reid and Sonia Hood (Study Advice team).

Restricted entry for exams – carry your card!

Rows of small tables and chairs set out for exams

Planning on revising in the Library over the coming weeks? Make sure you know what our Easter vacation opening hours are and that it’s ‘no card, no access’ after the Easter closure until the end of the summer term. Tuesday 7 April to Friday 12 June, overnight (Monday to Thursday, 17:00 – 08:00) and all weekend (17:00 Friday – 08:00 Monday) Library space is reserved for our own University members with Campus Cards and Library members holding Library Cards. This is to prevent disruption to our own revising students from non-University members, right until their last exam is over.

We reserve the right to refuse access to anyone, including University members, who cannot identify themselves adequately.

How to get in – card-holders

University of Reading Campus Card-holders and Library Card holders are welcome at all times. However, during restricted times, the revolving door will be locked, so please enter by the right-hand Library door.

  • University members gain automatic entry by placing their Campus Card on the ‘proximity reader’ beside the right-hand door.
  • Library Card holders must show their card to staff to gain entry. Please knock for attention if staff are not right beside the door.

Restrictions for visitors

Members of the public without cards are only admitted weekdays 08:00–17:00, 7 April – 12 June 2015. Regrettably, they may not use study spaces here as these are required by our own students revising for exams. Visitors are encouraged to look to their own school, college or public library for study space.

As always, our policy is that children in the Library must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

We apologise to visitors unable to use CaféLibro during restricted periods. Please try another outlet on campus or at Christchurch Green.

Campus Card faulty?

Should your University Campus Card fail to open the Library’s front door with the card reader, please ask Campus Card Services to fix the fault via their Campus Card non-residential door access report form or email cardfinance@reading.ac.uk.

 Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator

More surveying for future Library refurbishment

26718429You may notice more surveyors in the Library building, Monday 16 March to Monday 6 April, working on behalf of the ‘Feasibility Group on Refurbishment of the University Library’. This Group is considering a possible multi-million pound Library refurbishment over the next few years including:

  • total 1st and Ground Floor redesign (incorporating cafe and entrance changes)
  • window and building exterior renewal
  • heating and ventilation work and
  • re-siting new lifts.

Work may begin after exams.

How spring surveying may affect you

The Library’s disabled parking bays and an area of Blackhorse House car park will become inaccessible from the Thursday 12 March in order to house the  contractors’ compound. Heavy machinery will be delivered from Monday 16 March – take care when walking around the building.

Surveying work on the Library building begins outside on Wednesday 18 and inside on Thursday 19 March. Disruptive work will be limited to the early part of the working day when the Library is least busy, as far as is practicable. More disruptive work will be done in the first week of vacation (week beginning 30 March), just before the Easter shutdown. Work stops on the Library after Easter to allow for more peaceful exam revision. However, the URS building next door is also being surveyed and works here continue until the end of vacation, (17 April). Continue to take care outside our buildings.

Rachel Redrup, Marketing Co-ordinator; Robin Hunter, Facilities Manager

Citing references made easy with EndNote Web!

Student studyingThere are spaces still available on this week’s EndNote Web workshop for undergraduates and masters students.

Come along to learn how to use EndNote Web to…

  • store details of the books and articles you read
  • download references from databases such as the Web of Science
  • insert citations in your Word documents
  • build a bibliography in a style of your choosing at the click of a button

Workshop time

Wednesday 11 March, 14:00 – 15:30

Book your place

Book your place via the ‘Library course bookings’ link on the RISISweb portal.

This workshop is part of the Student Training and Experience Programme (STEP) and counts towards the RED Award.

Sally Smith, Learning Support Co-ordinator