New Think-Piece: Law in the Time of Cholera

We are pleased to publish our latest Think-Piece blogpost by Prof. Rosa Freedman (University of Reading) and Dr Nicolas Lemay-Hebert (University of Birmingham):

Law In The Time Of Cholera: Seeking Justice from the United Nations for Haiti’s Cholera Victims

Students build giant lego house to highlight key community issues

Students at the John Madejski Academy (JMA), Reading built a life-size house out of giant Lego blocks with the help of architects, as they constructed a vision of their ideal ‘home’.

The JMA hosted the first Whitley for Real project on Wednesday 10th May 2017, facilitated by the Whitley Researchers and Sally Lloyd-Evans. Students from Years 8 and 12 worked together as a team – named by them as ‘The Royalty’ – using 1,500 ‘bricks’ measuring up to 75 cm long to construct their home.

Whitley for Real is a partnership between Reading Borough Council, JMA, Reading Girls School, the Whitley Researchers and the Whitley Community Development Association (WCDA), Whitley Big Local, the University of Reading’s Participation Lab, Reading UKCIC  and a range  of stakeholders including Bewley Homes, Whitley Excellent Cluster (WEC)  primary schools and the community.  The home-building project, funded by Reading UKCIC and with support from Bewley Homes, the Whitley Researchers and involving academics from the University’s Participation Lab, focused on young people’s attitudes to what makes a ‘welcome home’ in Whitley.

Read the full press release here.

Youth Wellbeing Network

We are pleased to launch the Youth Wellbeing Network, a global network of policymakers, practitioners, researchers and youth supporting a holistic approach to young people’s psychosocial wellbeing, care and support.

For updates, visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/YWellbeingNet/ and join our group to share information about events, resources and to network: https://www.facebook.com/groups/YWellbeingNet/.

Developing a Science Shop in Reading

We are pleased to let you know about our latest Participation Lab project. Alice Mauchline, Lab Advisory Group member, in the School of Agriculture, Policy and Development is exploring how to best go about establishing a Science Shop in Reading and is planning a workshop to learn from existing Science Shops in June 2017. Read more about the project here.

Anxious about austerity: fragile family lives

As part of the Participation Lab’s Think-Pieces, we are pleased to publish our latest blogpost by Emma Cox, Geography undergraduate student, University of Reading: Anxious About Austerity: Fragile Family Lives. She writes that households and families are bearing the brunt of austerity and community systems are suffering.  The blogpost was written as part of the second year undergraduate module, Culture, Identity & Place, taught by Ruth Evans and Sally Lloyd-Evans, University of Reading.

Implementing Change for Hidden Young Carers

The Participation Lab was pleased to host the Implementing Change for Hidden Young Carers conference at the University of Reading on 22 February 2017. The conference was chaired by young adult carers and organised by the Children’s Society Include Project.

The Hidden Photography Exhibition displayed powerful photographs of hidden young carers and their perspectives.

                 

The conference, attended by 80 practitioners, directors of services and commissioners, provided updates on the current national picture for young carers and shared models of effective identification and whole family support for young carers and their families. Delegates heard from Mark Brown, Department of Health, about the new National Carers’ Strategy due to be launched soon in 2017 and from Helen Leadbitter about recent changes brought about by the Carers’ Act and Children and Families’ Act.

The afternoon focused on families affected by stigmatised illness and those often hidden from support, including young carers affected by parental substance misuse and mental illness. Ruth Evans and Helen Leadbitter presented the particular challenges faced by young carers in refugee and asylum-seeking families.

Young adult carers led important discussions about how caring affects young carers’ wellbeing, in positive as well as negative ways, and the importance of young carers’ participation so that they feel valued, heard and represented.

The emotional bucket and how the stresses young carers face can be alleviated by finding ways to open the tap and relax.

See the Agenda for more information.

 

LAST CHANCE TO BOOK: Implementing change for hidden young carers conference

University of Reading, 22 February 2017, 10am-5pm

Meadow Suite, WhiteKnights Campus, University of Reading, RG6 6UA

A FREE conference for practitioners, directors of services and commissioners to provide updates on the current national picture for young carers, share models of effective identification and whole family support for young carers and their families. In particular the afternoon will focus on families affected by stigmatised illness and those often hidden from support. See the Agenda.

Delegates will hear about the current National perspective for young carers and their families, including a review of the national legislation and guidance; hearing from the Department of Health about the new Carers Strategy (due for launch early 2017) and exploring how local authorities and communities can successfully implement whole family working. The afternoon will consist of a series of interactive ‘mini-lectures’ showcasing national and local implementation models from across England.

In order to secure your place please click on the following link

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/henley-conference-implementing-change-for-hidden-young-carers-tickets-29886598621

Launch of our new blogpost series: Think-Pieces!

We are pleased to launch our new blogpost series: Think-Pieces

Researchers, statutory and third sector partners, academics, students and Participation Lab members share their reflections and experiences on doing participatory action research, community development work, citizen science and engaging with young people, families and communities, whether locally in Reading, nationally or internationally.

Our first blogpost is by Dr. Giuseppe Feola, University of Reading:

How can participatory methods be adapted to different socio-cultural contexts? A critical evaluation of Rapid Appraisal of Agricultural Innovation Systems, and its application to agricultural adaptation to climate change in Kazakhstan

photo-2-3

Map of the challenges faced by different actors in the local farming system in Karaoi, Kazakhstan

Feel free to join in the conversation on Twitter using the hashtags, #ParticipationLab and #Think-Pieces.