Deathscapes and Diversity research project

We are pleased to welcome the Deathscapes and Diversity research project, led by Dr. Avril Maddrell, as one of the Participation Lab’s growing portfolio of projects.

Deathscapes and Diversity: Making space for Death and Remembrance in Multicultural England and Wales

Using four case study towns in England and Wales and a variety of creative and participatory methods, the project is exploring how the needs of migrants and established minorities are interpreted and met within existing public and private cemetery, crematoria and remembrance site provision, and how any shortfalls might be addressed through community participation and local authority planning. The project aims to identify best practice and to inform local government and other providers about improving cemetery and crematoria provision.

The project is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Economic and Social Research Council and is supported by the Institute of Cemetery and Crematorium Management and the Royal Town Planning Institute.

We’ll keep you posted on the planned visual exhibition, with photographs of participants, and other outputs in the coming months!

Lab Event in September: “Enthusiasm for Citizen Science”

originalAs part of our Participation Lab commitment to co-producing knowledge for social change, we’re also really interested in the role that volunteers play in the collection and production of knowledge relating to social and environmental issues. One of our events this September is all about citizen science, an activity regularly defined as the participation of volunteers in professional science projects. In addition to probing the definition a little further, we also want to consider recent studies on motivations but also the costs and benefits of citizen science. You’re all warmly invited to attend.

 

Enthusiasm for Citizen Science: Taking stock of motivations, costs and benefits.

9th September 2016, University of Reading

It is often said that citizen science is growing as a field of practice, and with that comes a growing understanding of how citizen science can and should be used. At this event, we will be sharing best practice and current thinking on recent research surrounding motivations (of citizens, scientists, practitioners and policymakers) and the costs and benefits of citizen science. The event will introduce several research projects, including two recently funded by the UK Environmental Observation Framework (see http://www.ukeof.org.uk/our-work/citizen-science). Bringing together members of the BES Citizen Science SIG with representatives from monitoring agencies, this one-day event on ‘enthusiasm for citizen science’ will enable participants to take stock of recent research, share good practice and identify new directions and issues for citizen science research to consider.

Speakers

Hilary Geoghegan (Participation Lab, University of Reading), Alison Dyke (Stockholm Environment Institute, University of York), Gitte Kragh (University of Bournemouth), Michael Pocock (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), other speakers/commentators to be confirmed

Location

University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, URS Building, S2S21

WHEN: Friday, 9 September 2016 from 10:30 to 15:30 (BST)

Free booking: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/enthusiasm-for-citizen-science-taking-stock-of-motivations-costs-and-benefits-tickets-26656013855