prosperity and resilience

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This free event organised by the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM) will bring together researchers and practitioners from France, the UK, and the USA who work with bilingual children with language impairment. The workshop will address the challenge of identifying language impairment in bilingual children. It will illustrate assessment material for bilingual children, explore the use of parent and teacher interviews, standardized tests, and narrative language sampling to support clinical decision making regarding diagnosis and intervention processes. Attendees will interpret standardized test data and use assessment protocols for making decisions based on language sampling that can be employed in everyday practice with bilingual children.

Maximum number of attendees: 40

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This free event will look into contemporary suggestions about the neuroprotective effects of bi-/multilingualism against brain decline in healthy and patient populations. It will bring together early career and established researchers in the fields of second language acquisition and cognitive/clinical neuroscience, and will comprise a state-of-the-art snapshot in the field, as well as discuss potential future directions for research.

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Professor Rhona Stainthorp will be giving a public lecture about multilingual literacy development. The event, hosted by the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM), aims to raise awareness of the challenges and opportunities multilingual children face when they learn how to read and write in more than one language.

Successful reading and writing involves coordinating word reading and spelling processes with language comprehension processes including vocabulary knowledge. Multilingual literacy involves coordinating these processes in at least two languages and two writing systems. We need to understand how the writing systems work to appreciate the challenges and opportunities faced by young literacy learners.

The public lecture will be followed by a roundtable discussion with Q&A with Professor Rhona StainthorpProfessor Ludovica Serratrice, Dr Naomi Flynn, and education practitioners. Before the public lecture, guests can attend our art exhibition titled ‘Point of Entry’ by Duncan Swann.

Admission is free, but booking is required.

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My name is Penélope, I am an architect activist/researcher from Venezuela, and part of the academic team of new School of Architecture.

Caracas, where I grew up, is a beautiful and exciting city, with great architecture, lively cultural scene, friendly people, delicious food, and the beautiful mountain Cerro Ávila. Sadly, in the last decade, Venezuela has become extremely politically polarised while Caracas is now one of the most violent cities in the world. The fear of being a victim of violence has compelled most people to entrench themselves in their homes. But this creates a vicious cycle, because the less we inhabit our streets and public spaces the more dangerous they become, and with time they fade from our mental, emotional and cultural map of the city.

I had always admired the work of Candy Chang, Rebar Group, Maya Lin, FLIX and the urban artivism collective Ser Urbano (of which I was an active member).  I realised that as an architect I not only had the creativity and skills to design and make buildings but also to positively transform how the city is perceived, occupied and inhabited, even through small but significant interventions in urban space. So I decided to take action.

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‘Fine-grained patterns of language use contribute to variance in bilingual language processing.’

Joanna John, University of Reading

3-4.15pm

‘Effect of socio-economic status on cognitive control in non-literate bilingual speakers.’

Dr Vishnu Kaleeckal Krishnankutty Nair, Flinders University, Australia

4.15 – 5.30pm

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‘How do you read a language you can’t hear? Insights into literacy from children who are deaf.’

Mairead McSweeney, University College London

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The Fate of the West

The Decline and Revival of the World’s Most Successful Political Idea

Bill Emmott, former editor of the Economist

 Free entry. No reservation necessary.

The idea of ‘the West’ has underpinned our prosperity and security for over seven decades. It stands for democratic institutions and values, a rules-based system of steadily freer trade, and a common European and Atlantic defence through NATO. Now it is under threat from within, as national-populists from Budapest to Washington seek not more democracy but authoritarian rule, not freer trade but protectionism, not common security but narrow national interest.

This is the alarming context in which the UK general election is taking place. Few people are better placed to analyse it than Bill Emmott, who presents his new book The Fate of the West at the University of Reading’s Van Emden Theatre on Tuesday 9 May at 7PM. Bill Emmott was editor of the Economist for thirteen years, has dissected the malaise of countries as distant as Japan and Italy, and is currently an independent writer and consultant, contributing to a wide range of publications and blogs including In Facts. He is joint founder of the Wake Up Foundation, a charity dedicated to using film, text and data for public education about the decline of Western societies. But The Fate of the West is not a cry of despair; rather, it is a tool kit for those of us who want to see Western values revive and prevail.

 

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Wolfenden Lecture

THE INAUGURAL WOLFENDEN LECTURE

LGBT equality: past, present and future

Thursday 4 May – 7.00pm | doors at 6.30pm

Van Emden Theatre, Edith Morley

We are delighted to welcome guest speaker Ruth Hunt, Chief Executive, Stonewall to the University of Reading to deliver our inaugural Wolfenden Lecture. Ruth will be discussing ‘LGBT Equality: Past, Present and Future’.

Ruth Hunt is the Chief Executive of Stonewall. In 2015, Ruth was voted the third most influential LGBT person in Britain in the Independent’s Rainbow List. She continues to be an inspirational figure today.

This special event is named in honour of the report written by The Wolfenden Committee, which was chaired by Lord Wolfenden in 1957, the University’s Vice‑Chancellor between 1950 and 1964. The report became a key milestone in LGBT history in the UK when it recommended that, ‘… homosexual behaviour between consenting adults in private should no longer be a criminal offence.’

On the 60th Anniversary of The Report of the Departmental Committee on Homosexual Offences and Prostitution (better known as the Wolfenden Report), we are pleased to celebrate this extraordinary part of our heritage with this special event to reflect on progress, and inspire future generations of the LGBT+ community and their allies to achieve great things.

Admission free. Booking essential. Please click here to register.

We look forward to welcoming you at what promises to be an interesting event.

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Reading Interdisciplinary Research Network for the Study of Political History & Politics in America

This is a one day conference to mark the launch of the new reading Interdisciplinary research network – The Monroe Group for the study of politics in the Americas.

The Monroe Group, is designed to encourage dialogue between scholars in the arts, humanities, social sciences and sciences working on all aspects of politics in the American continent. It has been developed in response to recent expansion of staff and student recruitment working in the field of US and Latin American politics at the University of Reading.

The Monroe Group will be home to existing UoR researchers and PhD students working in this area and will facilitate new collaborative projects, research grants applications and teaching development across all disciplines, including

  • US foreign policy
  • Climate Change Diplomacy
  • Gender, Diversity and Inclusion
  • Representations, Rhetoric and Media
  • Policy

Book your place here.

 

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CeLM Seminar Series

Development of a vocabulary screener for young children speaking multiple languages 

by Dr Claudine Bowyer-Crane, Dept of Education, University of York

 

The number of children in UK primary schools learning English as an additional language is growing. A consistent achievement gap is found in national assessments of language and literacy between children learning EAL and their monolingual peers at the early stages of schooling. Support for these pupils is vital.  However, in order to provide the right support it is important to identify those children who have a language impairment from those who may simply need more exposure to English. This paper will highlight some of the issues around the assessment children learning English as an Additional Language with a particular focus on vocabulary. Drawing on recent research, the paper will discuss the importance of assessing children in both their first and second languages and the challenge this poses for practitioners.  The paper will demonstrate a newly developed task for assessing receptive vocabulary in a child’s home language which is designed to be used by practitioners and researchers working with children learning EAL.

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