PhD success: An exploration of patients’ experiences, coping strategies and management of peripheral neuropathy in Kuwait

Maryam (center) with her academic supervisor, Dr Amelia Hollywood (right) and internal examiner, Dr. Rosemary Lim (left).

Many congratulations to Maryam Alkandari for sucessfully passing her PhD viva with minor corrections. Maryam’s research was conducted under the academic supervison of Professor Kath Ryan, Dr. Amelia Hollywood and Professor Rebecca Green. Her thesis explores the patient’s experiences and coping strategies of peripheral neuropathy in Kuwait. Her work has also been published in the peer-reviewed journal Pharmacy: https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy7030127

Reference

Alkandari, M. Ryan, K and Hollywood, A. The Experiences of People Living with Peripheral Neuropathy in Kuwait – A Process Map of the Patient Journey Pharmacy 2019;7(3):127

Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (UROP) 2019

This year we had three pharmacy undergraduates who successfully completed the research opportunity programme at Reading. We are especially pleased to announce that Pharmacy’s own undergraduate student, Bilal Mohammed was the recipient of the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (UROP) prize for the Health research theme 2019.

Bilal Mohammed, winner of the health research theme prize

Bilal was named as one of two overall winners awarded the opportunity to present their work at Posters in Parliament in Spring 2020. Bilal’s project was supported by an EPSRC Vacation Bursary awarded by the University of Reading. The project was supervised by Professors Rachel McCrindle and Simon Sherratt (Biomedical Engineering) and Professor Parastou Donyai (Pharmacy) and examined technologies to support medication reuse. Many congratulations to Bilal and the project team.

 

Selen Morelle

Selen Morelle, project entitled “How to best communicate with patients about their medication when they are being discharged from a Mental Health setting”, working with Orla McDonald (Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust).

 

Jamila Koradli

Jamila Koradli, project entitled “Pharmacy outreach project; podcasts, career wheel and happy families career cards”, working with Dr Mark Dallas as the co-investigator.

‘Behavioural insights to strengthen immunisation programmes’

Flavia, GTA in pharmacy practice, attended the BISS Summer School 2019

The Wellcome Global Monitor is a worldwide study on how people perceive science and health issues. Results from this study has shown that 79% of people believe in the safety of vaccines while in the UK, this figure drops to 75%. Vaccination is a vital health intervention that saves lives by preventing vaccine preventable diseases. It is also a key strategy in tackling antimicrobial resistance, a global health threat, by reducing the need for antibiotics. Flavia, GTA in pharmacy practice, attended a summer school organised by the University of Erfurt and World Health Organisation in August. The summer school focused on behavioural insights on how to strengthen immunisation programmes by following the Tailoring Immunisation Programmes (TIP) approach. Flavia will give a talk at the Pharmacy school seminar on 3rd Oct 19 to share her learning from the summer school by presenting the core elements of the TIP process to design interventions that can improve vaccination uptake.

Recent conference presentations

Catherine Langran, Kat Hall and Dan Grant presented their work at the 10th Biennial Monash Pharmacy Education Symposium in Prato, Italy, 7-10th July.

Presentation by Catherine Langran

Catherine Langran gave an oral presentation entitled “An Evaluation of Pharmacy Undergraduate Student Wellbeing”

Authors: Catherine Langran, Pari Ajgaonkar, Mona Qassim & Alicia Pena

Congratulations to Catherine, who was awarded first prize for the best talk on Education Research at the conference.

Presentation by Dan Grant

Dan Grant presented a poster snapshot on “Peer Assisted Learning – a learning opportunity and a life hack?”

Authors: Rosemary Lim, Caroline Crolla, Daniel Grant, Taniya Sharmeen & Wing Man Lau.

 

Presentation by Kat Hall

Kat Hall presented a poster snapshot on “An Evaluation of a certificate in business administration (CBS) programme for Mpharm students”

Authors: Kat Hall, Catherine Langran & Gavin Lawrence

“Hobson’s choice or a horned dilemma”: A grounded theory synthesis of the qualitative literature examining adherence to hormone therapy in breast cancer survivorship

The winning presentation by final year PhD researcher, Othman AlOmeir, at the PhD Pharmacy Conference, April 2019, Henley Business School, University of Reading.

Othman AlOmeir
Professor Parastou Donyai, Dr. Nilesh Patel and Dr. Nicola Stoner
Reading School of Pharmacy, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6UB. UK

Background: Depending on the researchers’ epistemological position, meta-syntheses of qualitative studies have used different approaches that include grounded theory synthesis. Numerous stand-alone qualitative studies have examined non-adherence to long-term hormonal treatment in breast cancer but no qualitative synthesis on this topic existed.

Objective: To theorise about why and how women experience non-adherence to hormonal treatment in breast cancer using published qualitative reports.

Methods: Qualitative reports were retrieved using 10 databases that included PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. Primary reports written in English that encompassed qualitative descriptions of women’s non-adherence to hormonal therapy in the management of breast cancer were included. In total 21 articles published 2010-2018 were included. A first order interpretation of quotes (n= 767) in these publications was first completed and then compared against the original authors’ analyses. Quotations and interpretations were reinterpreted in NVivo using open, axial and selective coding to develop new categories. Causal conditions, actions/interactions, consequences and mediating factors were then identified for each of three emerging categories using the paradigm model.

Results: Three main categories were identified describing the 1) initial consideration of hormone therapy; 2) adhering to prescribed treatment; and 3) stopping hormone therapy. The core category explored whether and where the patient’s decision to take the medication was akin to Hobson’s choice or a horned dilemma. Hobson’s choice describes a situation where only one real viable option is offered, and encapsulates the decision
faced by many at the start of the treatment. A horned dilemma in contrast is facing two equally bad options and relates to later experiences of having to tolerate medication side effects or stop the treatment and risk losing the prophylactic cover afforded by the
medicine.

Discussion: It was possible to uncover a world of collectively shared experiences and understandings in this area by examining commonalities in existing published papers. The core category explained the difficulties women face with the initial decision to accept long term hormonal treatment and then the everyday challenge of continuing with the treatment or stopping it prematurely.