‘Behavioural insights to strengthen immunisation programmes’

Flavia, GTA in pharmacy practice, attended the BISS Summer School 2019

The Wellcome Global Monitor is a worldwide study on how people perceive science and health issues. Results from this study has shown that 79% of people believe in the safety of vaccines while in the UK, this figure drops to 75%. Vaccination is a vital health intervention that saves lives by preventing vaccine preventable diseases. It is also a key strategy in tackling antimicrobial resistance, a global health threat, by reducing the need for antibiotics. Flavia, GTA in pharmacy practice, attended a summer school organised by the University of Erfurt and World Health Organisation in August. The summer school focused on behavioural insights on how to strengthen immunisation programmes by following the Tailoring Immunisation Programmes (TIP) approach. Flavia will give a talk at the Pharmacy school seminar on 3rd Oct 19 to share her learning from the summer school by presenting the core elements of the TIP process to design interventions that can improve vaccination uptake.

Rugby win!

Dr. Amelia Hollywood with her rugby team

Dr Amelia Hollywood, Lecturer in Health Services Research in the Reading School of Pharmacy, was selected to represent the South East of England and play in the England Nationals Masters Tournament.

The South East Sharks won the masters women’s category, after winning all their games with an overall score line of 49 tries for and only 5 tries against!

The Rugby World Cup starts this Friday, 20th September, with Japan taking on Russia. You can watch all the games on ITV to cheer on your country.

If you are inspired and would like to give a less contact version of rugby a try, there are o2 touch session running at the University of Reading Sports Park. More information can be found here: https://www.o2touch.co.uk/centres/university-of-reading/20711/

 

Professor Kath’s retirement

Professor Kath and PhD students at her retirement lunch

Professor Kath Ryan retired from the department in the summer after being in the school for four years. She has been a valuable member of staff within pharmacy practice in her role as Professor of Social Pharmacy. During her time in Reading, she made significant impact through her multiple research interests and through her supervision of numerous PhD, MSc and undergraduate pharmacy students. She provided a wealth of research experience and her support and guidance has been greatly valued by her colleagues and students. Following her retirement, Kath will be involved in the development of the pharmacy curriculum in Kenya which demonstrates her commitment and expert contribution to pharmacy practice. We wish her the best for all her future endeavors.

Recent conference presentations

Catherine Langran, Kat Hall and Dan Grant presented their work at the 10th Biennial Monash Pharmacy Education Symposium in Prato, Italy, 7-10th July.

Presentation by Catherine Langran

Catherine Langran gave an oral presentation entitled “An Evaluation of Pharmacy Undergraduate Student Wellbeing”

Authors: Catherine Langran, Pari Ajgaonkar, Mona Qassim & Alicia Pena

Congratulations to Catherine, who was awarded first prize for the best talk on Education Research at the conference.

Presentation by Dan Grant

Dan Grant presented a poster snapshot on “Peer Assisted Learning – a learning opportunity and a life hack?”

Authors: Rosemary Lim, Caroline Crolla, Daniel Grant, Taniya Sharmeen & Wing Man Lau.

 

Presentation by Kat Hall

Kat Hall presented a poster snapshot on “An Evaluation of a certificate in business administration (CBS) programme for Mpharm students”

Authors: Kat Hall, Catherine Langran & Gavin Lawrence

Recent publication from the Pharmacy Practice team

Community pharmacist led medication reviews in the UK: A scoping review of the medicines use review and the new medicine services literatures

 

1Duncan Stewart, 2Cate Whittlesea, 3Ranjita Dhittal, 1Louise Newbould, 1Jim McCambridge

 

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sapharm.2019.04.010

 

1. Department of Health Sciences, ARRC Building, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK

2. School of Pharmacy, University College London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX, UK

3. School of Pharmacy, University of Reading, Harry Nursten Building, PO Box 226, Whiteknights, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6AP, UK

 

Background

Medicines Use Reviews (MURs) and the New Medicine Service (NMS) are services delivered by UK community pharmacists to improve adherence, improve patient understanding of their medicines and reduce medicines wastage.

Aim

In this scoping review we aim to identify, map and critically examine the nature of existing empirical evidence in peer reviewed journals relating to MUR and NMS consultations.

Method

Systematic searches identified the available MUR and NMS empirical literature. We sought data on barriers and facilitators to conducting MUR or NMS consultations, the perceptions of pharmacists and patients, the conduct of consultations, and outcomes of consultations. Searches from 2005 (when MURs were introduced) to May 2018 were conducted in MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase and Scopus databases. Data were extracted into Excel for examination of study characteristics, participant characteristics, type of intervention/services delivered and key study quantitative and/or qualitative findings.

Results

Forty-one papers from 37 studies met the inclusion criteria: 28 papers were of MURs, 10 of NMS and 3 for both services. Studies focused on the introduction and implementation of these services, with little attention to outcomes for patients; effectiveness was not evaluated beyond in a single NMS RCT. Observational data indicated that pharmacists and patients view MURs and the NMS positively, despite challenges implementing these services and apparent lack of communication between pharmacists and GPs. Consultations were reported to be short, typically 10–12 min, characterised by limited engagement with patients and their health problems. The extent and nature of advice on health behaviours during consultations or other content was rarely examined.

Conclusion

The research literature on MURs and the NMS has developed slowly. There is much scope for further research attention to developing more patient-centred care.