Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Odds On for a White Christmas…? Time Will Tell

by Jon Shonk With Christmas lights sparkling in cities all around the UK, department stores festooned with lights and decorations and Christmas songs starting to be played on the radio, it is clear that the festive season is just around the corner. But will it snow…? The last widespread white Christmas in the UK was […]

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The big freeze in Reading

By Stephen Burt, Department of Meteorology Weather records began at Reading University College (as it was then) back in 1901, but in all the years since we’ve never had a March day as cold as yesterday, Thursday 1 March 2018. At noon yesterday, the temperature stood at just -3.5 °C, and with a strong north-easterly wind […]

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Sea breezes – in Reading?? Surely not!

By Stephen Burt It often comes as a great surprise to residents of Reading and the surrounding areas to find that  sea breezes occur this far inland. In fact, they are not uncommon: in an average year we see around half a dozen, more in warmer summers. There have been several in the recent warm […]

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The new International Cloud Atlas

By Stephen Burt Automatic weather stations (AWS) are increasingly commonplace in meteorological reporting systems: today more than half of all surface observations come from sites that are partly or fully automated. AWS have many advantages, particularly in remote sites, or providing observations outside of normal working hours (for instance, almost all UK night-time synoptic observations are […]

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Winter weather – and cycling in Reading

By Roger Brugge This tongue-in-cheek look at Reading’s weather in winter and its relationship to cycling safety was prompted by a couple of ice-related accidents experienced by members of staff during the cold and foggy weather of the morning of 24 January 2017 while cycling over the new cycle/pedestrian bridge in the town. The University’s […]

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What is an ORCID?

By Karen Rowlett Research Publications Adviser, University of Reading Library Have you been asked for your ORCID ID yet? Increasingly, research funders, employers and publishers are asking their researchers to sign up for an ORCID ID. What is an ORCID ID? An ORCID® identifier or ORCID iD is a 16-character identifier that can be used […]

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Open Access week – and atmospheric effects of solar eclipses

Next week is ‘Open Access Week’ , and to celebrate this, all Royal Society journal content will be completely free to access from Friday 21 October until 6 November. Solar eclipses rarely cross populated regions, but provide great opportunities both for science and science outreach when they do. The recent 20 March 2015 solar eclipse […]

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Watering the garden in April – how unusual is this?

Gardeners among the readership of this blog may already be watering their seeds in an attempt to ensure germination and early growth, and may be wondering how common this activity is (over the years) given the fact that spring is only halfway sprung and the past winter was not that dry overall. One observation carried […]

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A wet winter – and what might come next?

Much has been written/spoken in recent weeks about the amount of rain that has fallen this winter (December-February) in southern England (and other regions) of the United Kingdom. But several other interesting facts appear to have been overlooked in the almost daily (at times) deluge of information above high winds, heavy rainfall, high tides and […]

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December 2013-January 2014 in Reading: Wet and, at times, stormy

A brief overview After a dry start to December 2013 (just 11.3 mm of rain fell in the 33 days ending 0900 UTC on 15 December at the Department’s weather station) there was an abrupt change in the weather that was to last for over three weeks. Many others have, over recent days, written and […]

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