Posts Tagged ‘climate’

Have aerosols caused the observed North Atlantic multidecadal variability?

By Jon Robson Multidecadal changes in the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (NASST) have been linked to a range of important climate impacts in Europe, Africa (most notably Sahel rainfall) and North and South America. Indeed, in the mid 1990s an increase in hurricane numbers, and a shift in European climate (notably to wet and […]

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A case study of Multidecadal climate variability and prediction: The mid 1990s warming of the North Atlantic

The Earth is a complex system of interacting components, such as the atmosphere and ocean, which produce a wide variety of natural variability. This natural variability ensures that the evolution of a particular region’s climate, e.g. that of Western Europe, could be completely different to another region, or indeed the global mean climate. Such variability […]

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Future pathways for geoengineering research

Geoengineering is not going away any time soon. It is beginning to move from a fringe topic into the mainstream, and a genuine research community is starting to set the agenda for future research. ‘Climate engineering’ or ‘geoengineering’  is an umbrella term covering methods by which humans can modify Earth’s climate: carbon dioxide removal (CDR) […]

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Tell me a story… How do climate perceptions match up to observations?

By Helen Greatrex. “I don’t know the reasons, but I know the climate is changing,” Medhin Reda, a 45-year-old farmer eking a living for her family from two rain-fed fields in northern Ethiopia, said. “I don’t really remember drought seasons as a child… The rain was good.” [1] The world would be nothing without stories.  […]

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At the controls: should we consider geoengineering?

Towards the end of 2010 I wrote a post sketching out the current state of the science of geoengineering: the justification, the methods, and the effects. I closed by explaining that there is more than just the science to consider. It is obvious that something as profoundly significant as altering the climate system must be […]

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Communicating climate variability

Our evolving climate: communicating the effects of internal variability [Part of an article to appear in ‘Weather’] It is “very likely” that humans have caused most of the warming of the Earth’s climate since the mid-20th century; this was a key conclusion of the 4th Assessment Report (AR4; Solomon et al., 2007) of the Intergovernmental […]

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Setting the thermostat: an introduction to geoengineering

Over the course of two days starting on 8th November around 150 people gathered in the hallowed halls of the Royal Society to debate the future. And not just any future. It is a future humanity as a whole has difficulty grasping, and even more difficulty changing. The title of the discussion meeting was ‘Geoengineering: […]

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Week 1 – Current and future Ozone holes

During September and October the large spring-time depletion of stratospheric ozone, the so-called ozone-hole, occurs over the Southern Hemisphere polar cap. Despite the success of the Montreal Protocol in restricting production and emission of ozone depleting substances, large concentrations remain in the stratosphere and continue to cause major depletion of ozone each spring. A summary […]

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A brief history of early climate science

After all the recent controversy over hacked emails, IPCC errors and the British public apparently growing more skeptical about climate science and scientists, it is perhaps interesting to take a step back and look at why we believe that emissions of various gases can influence our climate. There are many comprehensive sources of the historical […]

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