Author Archives: danaallen

Challenges in the closure of the surface energy budget at the continental scale

By: Bo Dong Since satellite observations began in the late 1970s, our knowledge of energy flows in and out of the Earth’s climate system has been greatly advanced. Taking advantage of state-of-the-art Earth Observation (EO) programmes such as the Clouds … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, earth observation, Energy budget | Leave a comment

30 °C days in Reading

By: Roger Brugge The temperature in the Reading University Atmospheric Observatory peaked at 32.3°C on Saturday 29 June 2019. Press stories were full of pictures of people sunning themselves across parts of the United Kingdom in glorious sunshine – yet … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate change, University of Reading, Weather | Leave a comment

Science outreach in coastal Arctic communities

By: Lucia Hosekova Figure 1: NASA image by Robert Simmon based on Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) surface temperature analysis data including ship and buoy data from the Hadley Centre. Caption by Adam Voiland. Few people are more aware … Continue reading

Posted in Arctic, Climate, Climate change, Cryosphere, Outreach | Leave a comment

How climate modelling can help us better understand the historical temperature evolution

By: Andrea Dittus Figure 1: Annual global mean surface temperatures from NASA GISTemp, NOAA GlobalTemp, Hadley/UEA HadCRUT4, Berkeley Earth, Cowtan and Way, Copernicus/ECMWF and Carbon Brief’s raw temperature record. Anomalies plotted with respect to a 1981-2010 baseline. Figure and caption from Carbon Brief (https://www.carbonbrief.org/state-of-the-climate-how-world-warmed-2018). Earth’s climate has warmed … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling | Leave a comment

The OpenIFS User Workshop

By Bob Plant I’ve been asked to write a blog post to go live on 17 June, the opening day of the 2019 OpenIFS user workshop. As I’m involved in the organisation, it would almost seem strange not to talk … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Climate, extratropical cyclones, Numerical modelling, Teaching & Learning | Leave a comment

Climate Action by Reducing Digital Waste

By: John Methven Climate action has never been higher on the global agenda. There is a pressing need to change our activities and habits, both at work and home, to steer towards a more sustainable future. National governments, public sector … Continue reading

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Teaching in China and some Good and Bad Teaching Practices

By: Hilary Weller In April 2019 I visited the Nanjing University Institute of Information, Science and Technology (NUIST) where students are studying for a degree in Meteorology jointly between Reading and NUIST. Staff from Reading visit a couple of times … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Climate, Teaching & Learning | Leave a comment

What sets the pattern of dynamic sea level change in the Southern Ocean?

By: Matthew Couldrey Figure 1a: Multi-model mean projection of dynamic and steric (i.e. due to thermal and/or haline expansion/contraction) sea level rise averaged over 2081-2100 relative to 1986-2005 forced with a moderate emissions scenario (RCP4.5), including 0.18 m +/- 0.05 … Continue reading

Posted in antarctica, Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling, Oceans | Leave a comment

What do we do with weather forecasts?

By: Peter Clark As I sat in the Kia Oval in Kennington having taken a day off to watch the first One Day International between England and Pakistan, I had plenty of time to appreciate the accuracy and utility of … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Predictability, Weather, Weather forecasting | Leave a comment

Rescuing the Weather

By: Ed Hawkins Over the past 12 months, thousands of volunteer ‘citizen scientists’ have been helping climate scientists rescue millions of lost weather observations. Why? Figure 1: Data from Leighton Park School in Reading from February 1903. If we are to … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, data assimilation, Data processing, Historical climatology, Outreach, Weather | Leave a comment