Author Archives: danaallen

What do we do with weather forecasts?

By: Peter Clark As I sat in the Kia Oval in Kennington having taken a day off to watch the first One Day International between England and Pakistan, I had plenty of time to appreciate the accuracy and utility of … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Predictability, Weather, Weather forecasting | Leave a comment

Rescuing the Weather

By: Ed Hawkins Over the past 12 months, thousands of volunteer ‘citizen scientists’ have been helping climate scientists rescue millions of lost weather observations. Why? Figure 1: Data from Leighton Park School in Reading from February 1903. If we are to … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, data assimilation, Data processing, Historical climatology, Outreach, Weather | Leave a comment

Mapping bio-UV products from space

By: Michael Taylor Solar radiation arriving at the Earth’s surface in the UV part of the spectrum modulates photosynthetically-sensitive life on the land and in the oceans. UV radiation also drives important chemical reaction pathways in the atmosphere that impact … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, earth observation, Remote sensing, Solar radiation | Leave a comment

The sky is the limit – How tall buildings affect wind and air quality

By: Denise Hertwig Based on current UN estimates, by 2050 over 6.6 billion people (68% of the total population) will be living in cities. Across the world, tall (> 50 m height) and super-tall (> 300 m) buildings already define … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

Balloon measurements at Stromboli suggest radioactivity contributes charge in volcanic plumes

By: Martin Airey Volcanic lightning is an awe-inspiring and humbling display of nature’s power. It results from the breakdown of large electric fields that are generated within the volcanic plume. The processes that result in the accumulation of charge are … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Convection, Measurements and instrumentation, Volcanoes | Leave a comment

Convective self-aggregation: growing storms in a virtual laboratory

By: Chris Holloway Figure 1: An example of convective self-aggregation from an RCE simulation using the Met Office Unified Model at 4km grid length with 300 K SST.  Time mean precipitation in mm/day for (a) Day 2 (still scattered), and … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate modelling, Numerical modelling, Tropical convection | Leave a comment

Modelling Ice Sheets in the global Earth System

By: Robin Smith As Till wrote recently, our national flagship climate model (UKESM1, the UK Earth System Model) has been officially released for the community to use, after more than six years in development by a team drawn from across … Continue reading

Posted in antarctica, Arctic, Climate, Climate modelling, Cryosphere, Numerical modelling | Leave a comment

The Boundary Layer and Submesoscale Motions

By: Alan Grant Science is an exciting career, although what you may consider to be exciting will depend on your field. Sometimes things get most exciting when what initially appears to be a frustrating problem turns into an interesting problem. … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Numerical modelling, Oceans | Leave a comment

Multi-fluids Modelling of Convection

By: Hilary Weller Atmospheric convection – the dynamics behind clouds and precipitation – is one of the biggest challenges of weather and climate modelling. Convection is the driver of atmospheric circulation, but most clouds are smaller than the grid size … Continue reading

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SuPy: An urban land surface model for Pythonista

By: Ting Sun Python is now extensively employed by the atmospheric sciences community for data analyses and numerical modelling thanks to its simplicity and the large scientific Python ecosystem (e.g., PyData community). Although I cherish Mathematica as my native programming … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Climate modelling, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment