Author Archives: hjia

Clouds, climate and the Roaring 40s

By Richard Allan In our new research we have traced large and long-standing biases in computer simulations of climate, affecting the tempestuous Southern Ocean, to errors in cloud that emerge rapidly within the atmospheric models. Biases evolve over time through … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling, Clouds, earth observation, Energy budget, Numerical modelling, Oceans, Solar radiation | Leave a comment

Why was the sky Orange?

By William Davies I was sitting in my house one morning in October 2017, engrossed in what I was doing. Gradually I noticed that an eerie darkness was smothering the natural light in the room. I stopped and looked outside. … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Atmospheric chemistry, Atmospheric optics, Climate, Climate modelling, earth observation, Environmental hazards, Numerical modelling, Remote sensing, University of Reading | Leave a comment

Climate change art and politicisation

By Max Leighton Figure 1 “Ice Watch” by Olafur Eliasson at the Place du Panthéon. The blocks of glacial ice taken from Greenland melted away from 3rd to 12th December 2015, during the Paris COP21 international climate negotiations. Artists have … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Climate, Climate change | Leave a comment

Characteristics of cumulus population and microphysical properties observed over Southeast Atlantic

By Yann Blanchard Figure 1. Cumulus in the vicinity of Ascension Island, in a 100 x 100km image (which is close to global climate model spatial resolution) from MODIS onboard AQUA (22 July 2016) Shallow cumulus cover large areas in … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Atlantic, Atmospheric chemistry, Climate modelling, earth observation, Numerical modelling, Oceans, Remote sensing, Solar radiation, University of Reading | Leave a comment

Sting jets in winter storms : how do the winds get so strong?

By Ambrogio Volonté Figure 1: Windstorm Tini (12 Feb 2014) passes over the British Isles bringing extreme winds. A sting jet has been identified in the storm. Image courtesy of NASA Earth Observatory The arrival of a winter storm battering … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate change, extratropical cyclones, Monsoons, Numerical modelling, sting jet, University of Reading, Weather, Weather forecasting | Leave a comment

Summer temperatures 2018 – the ‘new normal’?

By Professor Sir Brian Hoskins (Grantham Institute, Imperial College London and Emeritus Professor at the University of Reading department of Meteorology) and Stephen Belcher (Met Office Chief Scientist and Visiting Professor at the University of Reading department of Meteorology) Figure 1. Hyde … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate change, Greenhouse gases, Historical climatology, Weather | Leave a comment

Exploring the impact of Gulf Stream temperature biases on the global atmospheric circulation

By Robert Lee The climate state in numerical models often have differences when compared to a climatology from observations. These differences are often termed ‘biases’ and can be considered as a kind of error or deficiency in the model. These … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate modelling, Numerical modelling, Oceans, Waves | Leave a comment

What a summer!

By Ben Cosh What a summer it has been so far. The data is brilliant when it is like this. Stephen Burt keeps an eye on it and has filled me in on the (nearly) record-breaking numbers we’re seeing. It’s … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Historical climatology, Weather | Leave a comment

A newcomer’s reflections on the fourth Lusaka Learning Lab

By Max Leighton (Social Research Assistant for Professor Ted Shepherd) Figure 1: Lusaka participants recording a video message for the Maputo Learning Lab team. The fourth Lusaka Learning Lab took place on the 17-18th April 2018, which is where I … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Climate, Climate change, Hydrology | Leave a comment

DARE to use datasets of opportunity

By Joanne Waller To accurately forecast the weather, we must first describe what is currently happening in the atmosphere. To determine the current atmospheric state, we could use: Previous forecasts (data from complex computational models of the atmosphere) which provide … Continue reading

Posted in data assimilation, earth observation, Flooding, University of Reading, Weather, Weather forecasting | Leave a comment