Author Archives: Stephen Burt

Heat waves of the past decade in Chinese mega-cities: a quick review

By Ting Sun Although cities are often already warmer than their rural surroundings (the well-known “urban heat island” effect), heat waves (HWs), excessively hot periods, will not only enhance the urban and rural temperatures but also exacerbate the contrast between … Continue reading

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Abrupt climate change at the Royal Meteorological Society

By Joy Singarayer Recently I was excited to be invited to attend and talk at a Royal Meteorological Society meeting in London on abrupt climate change since the last ice age. The scope of the meeting was to highlight mechanisms … Continue reading

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The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (UROP)

By Charlie Williams The Undergraduate Research Opportunities Programme (UROP) is a scheme run by Careers at the University of Reading, enabling undergraduate students in the middle of their degree to work alongside an academic and gain hands-on research experience. They … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling, Monsoons, University of Reading | Leave a comment

Simulating the effect of electrical charge on cloud drops using Direct Numerical Simulation

By Torsten Auerswald In the atmosphere, clouds develop when water vapour condenses leading to the formation of cloud drops. This process is usually supported by the presence of condensation nuclei which allow drop formation at low supersaturations. Aerosol particles in the … Continue reading

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Forecasting the Indian monsoon

By Arathy Menon The South Asian monsoon, which brings rainfall to India and the neighbouring countries during the boreal summer season, is a major atmospheric circulation system. India receives more than 80% of its annual rainfall during the monsoon season, generally … Continue reading

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Recent progress on decadal prediction in the North Atlantic

by Jon Robson The North Atlantic is a region of the Earth that is characterised by pronounced multi-decadal variability in surface temperatures – a phenomenon that has become known as Atlantic Multi-decadal Variability (AMV, see Sutton et al for a … Continue reading

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Without the Tibetan Plateau, what would happen to the Asian summer monsoons?

By Mike Wong The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and most extensive plateau in the world, with an average elevation exceeding 4000 metres and stretching over 2.5 million square kilometres. While it is often called the ‘rooftop of the world’, … Continue reading

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Can we use future data to improve our knowledge of the ocean?

By Chris Thomas An interesting problem in climate science is working out what happened in the world’s oceans in the last century. How did the temperature change, where were the currents strongest, and how much ice was there at the … Continue reading

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Sunny, Windy Sundays

By Daniel Drew Throughout the day National Grid (the system operator of the electricity network in Great Britain) must ensure there is a balance between the demand for electricity and the amount generated. Historically this has involved forecasting the level … Continue reading

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The Role of Synoptic Meteorology on UK Air Pollution

By Chris Webber In the past year the issue of air pollution within the UK has been elevated, driven by the loss of life that it causes (in 2013 > 500,000 years of UK lives lost due to air pollution … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Atmospheric chemistry, Boundary layer, Environmental hazards, Urban meteorology | Tagged | Leave a comment