Category Archives: Climate

Convective self-aggregation: growing storms in a virtual laboratory

By: Chris Holloway Figure 1: An example of convective self-aggregation from an RCE simulation using the Met Office Unified Model at 4km grid length with 300 K SST.  Time mean precipitation in mm/day for (a) Day 2 (still scattered), and … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate modelling, Numerical modelling, Tropical convection | Leave a comment

Modelling Ice Sheets in the global Earth System

By: Robin Smith As Till wrote recently, our national flagship climate model (UKESM1, the UK Earth System Model) has been officially released for the community to use, after more than six years in development by a team drawn from across … Continue reading

Posted in antarctica, Arctic, Climate, Climate modelling, Cryosphere, Numerical modelling | Leave a comment

The Boundary Layer and Submesoscale Motions

By: Alan Grant Science is an exciting career, although what you may consider to be exciting will depend on your field. Sometimes things get most exciting when what initially appears to be a frustrating problem turns into an interesting problem. … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Numerical modelling, Oceans | Leave a comment

Multi-fluids Modelling of Convection

By: Hilary Weller Atmospheric convection – the dynamics behind clouds and precipitation – is one of the biggest challenges of weather and climate modelling. Convection is the driver of atmospheric circulation, but most clouds are smaller than the grid size … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Convection, Numerical modelling | Leave a comment

SuPy: An urban land surface model for Pythonista

By: Ting Sun Python is now extensively employed by the atmospheric sciences community for data analyses and numerical modelling thanks to its simplicity and the large scientific Python ecosystem (e.g., PyData community). Although I cherish Mathematica as my native programming … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Climate modelling, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

The future of spaceborne cloud radars, and some very specific questions about raindrops and snowflakes

By: Shannon Mason Cloud profiling radars (CPRs) provide snapshots of the journeys of many billions of hydrometeors through the column of the atmosphere: from ice particles and liquid droplets in clouds, to the snowflakes and raindrops—mostly raindrops—that reach us at … Continue reading

Posted in Climate | Leave a comment

The North Atlantic Oscillation and the Signal to Noise Paradox

By: Daniel Hodson  The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a key driver of European weather. It is an Atlantic pressure dipole (Figure 1a) and varies over time, with some interesting long-term trends (Figure 1b). The NAO directly affects EU climate … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Predictability, Stratosphere | Leave a comment

UKESM1 ready to use and in production for CMIP6

By: Till Kuhlbrodt Development of the UK Earth System Model (UKESM1) has reached a major milestone. After six years of work on the model (see my earlier blog post here) the UKESM core group, and other scientists, are now running … Continue reading

Posted in antarctica, Atmospheric chemistry, Climate, Climate modelling, Numerical modelling | Leave a comment

Improving forecasting of flooding from intense rainfall through interdisciplinary research

By: Linda Speight In England and Wales alone 3 million properties are at risk of surface water flooding. Having spent the past year speaking to a number of experts in the field (see below), I feel confident saying the universal … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Flooding, Hydrology | Leave a comment

Remodelling Building Design Sustainability from a Human Centred Approach (Refresh) project overview

By: Hannah Gough In 2014, 54 % of the world’s population resided in an urban area and this is projected to rise to 66 % by 2050 (United Nations, 2014). It is also estimated that 90 % of people’s time in … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment