Category Archives: Numerical modelling

Without the Tibetan Plateau, what would happen to the Asian summer monsoons?

By Mike Wong The Tibetan Plateau is the highest and most extensive plateau in the world, with an average elevation exceeding 4000 metres and stretching over 2.5 million square kilometres. While it is often called the ‘rooftop of the world’, … Continue reading

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BoBBLE: Air-sea interactions and intraseasonal oscillations in the Bay of Bengal

By Simon Peatman The Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) is one of the most significant features of the tropical climate. The heavy rain it brings during boreal summer provides around 80% of the annual precipitation over much of India with over 1 … Continue reading

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Responding to the threat of hazardous pollutant releases in cities

By Denise Hertwig High population density and restricted evacuation options make cities particularly vulnerable to threats posed by air-borne contaminants released into the atmosphere through industrial accidents or terrorist attacks. In order to issue evacuation or sheltering advice to the … Continue reading

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Time scales of atmospheric circulation response to CO2 forcing

By Paulo Ceppi An important question in current climate change research is, how will atmospheric circulation change as the climate warms? When simulating future climate scenarios, models commonly predict a shift of the midlatitude circulation to higher latitudes in both … Continue reading

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What’s in a number?

By Nancy Nichols Should you care about the numerical accuracy of your computer? After all, most machines now retain about 16 digits of accuracy, but usually only about 3-4 figures of accuracy are needed for most applications;  so what’s the … Continue reading

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Soil Moisture retrieval from satellite SAR imagery

By Keith Morrison Soil moisture retrieval from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery uses the knowledge that the signal reflected from a soil is related to its dielectric properties. For a given soil type, variations in dielectric are controlled solely … Continue reading

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Can observations of the ocean help predict the weather?

By Amos Lawless It has long been recognized that there are strong interactions between the atmosphere and the ocean. For example, the sea surface temperature affects what happens in the lower boundary of the atmosphere, while heat, momentum and moisture … Continue reading

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Why has there been a rapid increase in heat-related extremes in Western Europe since the mid-1990s?

By Buwen Dong In the last few decades, Europe has warmed not only faster than the global average, but also faster than expected from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases (van Oldenborgh et al., 2009). With the warming, Europe experienced record-breaking heat … Continue reading

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The physics behind a physics scheme

By Alan Grant When I joined the Met Office (or, as it was then, The Meteorological Office), I was posted to the boundary layer group. I spent a number of years investigating the atmospheric boundary layer, using data from aircraft … Continue reading

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Changing wet and dry seasons

By Richard Allan The fickle nature of weather patterns is ultimately responsible for the where and when of tropical rainfall extremes which wreak damage on agriculture, infrastructure and people. Tropical cyclones, such as Enawo which battered Madagascar in March, can … Continue reading

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