University of Reading June Open Days

Library building on a clear sunny day with hedge in the foreground.

Make sure to drop by the Library during your Open Day visit!

The Library will be welcoming Open Day visitors on Friday 16 and Saturday 17 June. Have you registered yet? If not, make sure to head over to our Open Days webpage to find out more.    

Throughout our Open Days, prospective students and their families are encouraged to visit the Library building. Our friendly and knowledgeable staff and Student Ambassadors will be on hand to answer questions and queries and provide in-person tours. Self-guided tours are also available for those who want to explore at their own pace. 

 While you’re here, make sure you check out: 

  • Study spaces: Whether you’re collaborating on a group project or prefer to study alone, we have a range of spaces to suit your needs. From bookable group study rooms to silent study spaces, you can be sure of finding your new favourite spot. 
  • Wide range of print resources: Explore our vast selection of print books and journals spanning across three floors. 
  • Study Advice desk: Learn about our Study Advisers and how they can help you get better results and discover how our Academic Liaison Librarians can help with your subject-specific queries. 

If you need to refuel, don’t forget to stop at the Library Café before exploring the rest of our beautiful campus. 

Out of time but still want to see the Library? Watch one of our self-paced tours to learn more at your leisure. 

No matter what you choose to study, the Library is ready to welcome you. Come and visit and find out how to make the most of your studies at the University of Reading. 

We look forward to seeing you. 

  

  

Your Library Team  

World Poetry Day in the Library

UNESCO declared in 1999 that the 21st March would be made World Poetry Day, to promote the writing, reading, publishing and teaching of poetry throughout the world. In the UK we were already celebrating National Poetry Day in the first week of October, but we were very happy to take another one!

So, to celebrate the occasion, we would like to share some poems we particularly like.

Of course they’re all about books. What else would you expect?

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) was regarded as an eccentric during her lifetime for only wearing white and preferring not to leave her bedroom. Of course, nobody really needs to leave their bedroom, if that’s where all their books are, and it certainly didn’t stop her from becoming one of the USA’s most important poets. You can find her work on the 4th Floor of the library at 811.39-DIC, or in a number of e-book editions through the Enterprise catalogue.

I could never have dreamt that there were such goings-on
in the world between the covers of books,
such sandstorms and ice blasts of words,
such staggering peace, such enormous laughter,
such and so many blinding bright lights,
splashing all over the pages
in a million bits and pieces
all of which were words, words, words,
and each of which were alive forever
in its own delight and glory and oddity and light.

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas, who described himself as a ‘roistering, drunken and doomed poet’, also liked to crack open a book. He is perhaps best known for his play Under Milk Wood and his poem ‘Do not go gentle into that good night’. If you’d like to read them, you can find his work at 821.912-THO, on the 4th Floor.

Coincidentally, while Dickinson did her best work during her years of seclusion, Thomas was once locked in a room by a friend until he finished the stage adaptation of Under Milk Wood. Is this an essay-writing tip that Study Advice would recommend? Absolutely not. But at least we can all appreciate the value of peace and quiet and study space and teetering towers of books without necessarily locking ourselves in there.

In the Eden I’d like to build
There’s a wealth of library nooks;
There are thousands of shelves and all of them filled
With an orderly display of books.
And lest the dear number appall
Even one most bookishly willed,
There’s wideness of leisure to read them all
In the Eden I’d like to build.

Anonymous

Aaah, that’s the dream.

Do you have a favourite poem you’d like to share?

Celebrate LGBT+ History month 

University of Reading LGBT+ icon and text; purple text on a bright blue background with a heartshaped rainbow This month is LGBT+ History month, an opportunity to learn about lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and non-binary history, and we wanted to share some resources with you all… 

LGBT+ Guide 

LGBT+ is an area of research that covers a wide range of academic disciplines so we would like to highlight the  online guide to support research into LGBT+-related topics. 

Taking the same format as our  subject guides  this guide focuses on the range of materials available from the Library and Special Collections relating to LGBT+ topics. 

It is one of a series of cross-disciplinary research guides we have developed to support research in areas such as  disability and inclusion, gender, and race and ethnicity. 

It has been created, in consultation with staff and student representatives, to help you find some of the key resources the Library can provide in this area, as well as point you towards other useful online resources, libraries and archives. 

We’d love to hear your feedback on the guide, so  let us know what you think! 

LGBT+2023 logo made up of the rainbow colours with white text on a black clapper board.

Have you explored our collection of LGBT+ film resources?

Suggest resources to help diversify our collections 

You can also help us to continue to diversify the Library’s collections by putting forward your  suggestions. 

If you would like to suggest other items for the Library, please complete our regular  book suggestion form. 

You can see all the Diversity fund titles purchased in current and previous academic years on our dedicated  Library Diversity fund reading lists. 

 

Tim Chapman,

Library Diversity and Inclusion Lead

Introducing the University’s Wellbeing book collection

Letters on a board spelling 'Don't panic' in white capital letters on a pink background.

Our wellbeing collection may be able to help

Thanks to a generous donation from the Alumni and Supporter Engagement Team, the University Library has been developing a collection of books and e-books that fall under the general wellbeing category. We hope this will be of benefit to as many students and staff as possible – and be used in conjunction with all the other support services available at the University.

A stack of brightly coloured books

We have a wide range of books about wellbeing to choose from

Students and staff have been providing recommendations for this collection throughout 2022, helping us to make it as broad as possible. We have bought 100s of items on topics from mindfulness and mental health to student life and resilience. From stress and anxiety to autism and ADHD.

Take a look at the list of everything we’ve purchased so far –  Wellbeing books 2022.

 

It is a living and growing collection so if you spot an area that you think is missing, or can recommend a book that has helped you, it’s not too late to add to the collection. Simply fill in the book details on this suggestion form.

 

You may find a useful gem that could inspire you or help you get back on track. There are so many fantastic books that can provide all sorts of help, but don’t forget our brilliant Counselling and Wellbeing service based in the Carrington building on Whiteknights campus. They work throughout the year to help with a wide range of issues. The service offers support including one-to-one (either face to face, on the phone or over Teams), groups, workshops, online guidance and onward referrals to other support services, and is open to all registered students (undergraduate or postgraduate) at the University, free of charge.

Counselling and Wellbeing service – A guide to accessing the service.

 

Tim Chapman

Diversity and Inclusion Lead

University of Reading Library, September 2022.

Borrow more books for longer!

As well as upgrading all our 7-day loan books to standard loan we’re making even more improvements so you can borrow more books for longer.  

Seated person with a large stack of books on the desk directly in front

Items can be loaned at the Self-Service Points on the Ground Floor

What’s changing? 

From Tuesday 16 August

  • loan allowances will be increased 

All undergraduates, taught postgraduates, and associate members will be able to borrow up to 25 books.  

  • increased standard loan period  

We decided that all members of the University Library would benefit from the same 6 week loan period so all standard loans will be issued for 6 weeks, subject to recall. 

  • no more overdue fines (EXCEPT for overdue recalls). 

Overdue fines on items that are not in demand will no longer apply.  

Fines will only be applicable if you receive an email to say an item is recalled, and you do not return the item before the recall date. Overdue fines on term loans will no longer apply nor will fines be charged on overdue periodicals. In other words, apart from late return on recalled items, fines will no longer be charged. 

 

What about Short Loan? 

All Short Loan items (items which were previously overnight loan only) are now available for standard loan.  

Remember, due to changes to loan periods, these items can be borrowed for 6 weeks. A small number of very popular items have been made non-loan and they are shelved in the main collection. Photocopies are also non-loan and are shelved on the Ground Floor in the quiet study area. 

 

What if the item I need is on loan? 

If you’re already worrying that you won’t be able to get hold of the book(s) you need, please don’t – we’ve got that covered!  

If all copies of an item you need are on loan, please place a hold. This will ensure that the item is recalled and alerts us to the increased demand for the item. We have procedures in place which mean, if an increased demand is evidenced, we endeavour to buy further copies.  

By using the Library services and systems that are already in place you’ll find the new loan periods a real enhancement when borrowing print books.   

Remember – keep an eye on your account to ensure that you know  

  • what items you have on loan and  
  • how many you have. 

These improvements, along with keeping an eye on your account, should mean you need never get a Library fine again! 

As always, if you have any questions or wish to provide feedback on these changes, please let us know. 

Your Library Team 

7-day loans are changing…

What’s happening? 

To improve your access to, and experience of using Library print books, we’re making some changes! The first of these is to loan types. On Tuesday 12 July 2022 we’ll be making all 7-day loan books standard loans so you can borrow them for longer – nearly 40,000 item records will be updated to become standard loans’.

Standard loans are either 6 weeks for staff and research students, or 3 weeks for all other Library members with borrowing rights.

We hope this will improve your experience of borrowing books and help you manage your Library account more easily.

Floating open book surrounded by bookshelves filled with books in dim light Photo by @jareddc?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Jaredd Craig on unsplash.com

Changes to book loans are underway

What will happen to my loans? 

All 7-day loan books that are currently on loan will automatically be made standard loan and renewed. Please check your account for your new due date(s).

There are many other changes to come, all designed to make borrowing easier. Keep up with further information about updates to Library loans and allowances via our social media, our blog or get in touch.

 

Your Library Team

Library website migration

The Library webpages have moved over to the University’s new content management system (CMS) – you may already be familiar with the new interface as many areas of the University website have already been migrated.

Partial image of the new Library website.

The migration means that the look and feel of our webpages have changed, but access to all our guidance, resources and other information should remain available. If you can’t find the information you’re looking for, please email us at library@reading.ac.uk so that we can help you stay on track with all your information needs.

Your Library team

Black History Month 2021- Race & Ethnicity Libguide

This October, we are launching a new guide. 

University of Reading Black History Month graphic, square box made up of black background with flashes of red, yellow and green, with white text. White clenched fist outline on yellow and black background.

Black History Month 2021– there’re lots of activities on offer at the University of Reading

The Race and Ethnicity Libguide covers a wide range of academic disciplines such as sociology, culture, languages, heritage, and many other subjects too.  

This guide will introduce you to some of key resources the Library can provide and will point you towards other relevant online resources and libraries. 

We have lots of new books for you to explore. Many of these titles are relevant to UK Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) experiences but there is also a wide selection relating to International experiences. Look at the Books tab to see newly published and seminal resources that are available from the Library to help you build on your knowledge and understanding of BAME dialogues.  

Books on shelves, purple pillar, grey carpet

What would you like to see on our shelves?

 

Have you heard about our fund to help to Diversify the collections

 

The section on ‘Diversifying our collections’ will help build your understanding of this movement- why it matters and what you can do to help. 

 

If you want help finding out more about BAME academics here at the University of Reading, have a look at the Further Resources tab to see a list of some of the recent research outputs by BAME staff. You can also search for publications about race and ethnicity in the research repository, centAUR. 

 

If you have an idea for a resource you’d like to see listed, please get in touch. We hope that you will find this guide useful.

 

Your Library Team

 

Black History Month 2021- Race & Ethnicity Libguide

This October, we are launching a new guide. 

University of Reading Black History Month graphic, square box made up of black background with flashes of red, yellow and green, with white text. White clenched fist outline on yellow and black background.

Black History Month 2021– there’re lots of activities on offer at the University of Reading

The Race and Ethnicity Libguide covers a wide range of academic disciplines such as sociology, culture, languages, heritage, and many other subjects too.  

This guide will introduce you to some of key resources the Library can provide and will point you towards other relevant online resources and libraries. 

We have lots of new books for you to explore. Many of these titles are relevant to UK Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) experiences but there is also a wide selection relating to International experiences. Look at the Books tab to see newly published and seminal resources that are available from the Library to help you build on your knowledge and understanding of BAME dialogues.  

Books on shelves, purple pillar, grey carpet

What would you like to see on our shelves?

 

Have you heard about our fund to help to Diversify the collections

 

The section on ‘Diversifying our collections’ will help build your understanding of this movement- why it matters and what you can do to help. 

 

If you want help finding out more about BAME academics here at the University of Reading, have a look at the Further Resources tab to see a list of some of the recent research outputs by BAME staff. You can also search for publications about race and ethnicity in the research repository, centAUR. 

 

If you have an idea for a resource you’d like to see listed, please get in touch. We hope that you will find this guide useful.

 

Your Library Team

 

Education students, welcome to UoR Library!

Femail teacher at door of school classroom furniture

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Solutions on Unsplash

Early September, children return to school and we welcome postgraduate students learning to teach them with our Institute of Education. Greetings!

Why not come to meet your Education Academic Liaison Librarians and Study Advisers at the ‘marketplace’ in RUSU’s Cafe Mondial, 10:00-12:30 on Friday 3 (secondary students) or 12:00-13:00 Wednesday 8 September (primary students). We’ll also be around all year to support your studies of course!

Check out our Education subject and referencing guide online to discover online and physical resources – much is online, linked to your reading lists, with printed theory and Teaching Practice Collection resources in the Library building.

You can see what the Library is like right now on YouTube. Do visit the Library on Whiteknights campus once you receive your Campus card. Please note that our opening hours extend in a few weeks time when full term begins. Watch our Library website for changes to accessing collections and our modern study spaces, or follow us on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram)!

Your Academic Liaison Librarians for Education

 

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

May 17 is International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia aka ‘IDAHOBIT’ Day.

Rainbow flag flapping in the wind with blue skies and the sun

The LGBT+ Libguide (Library resources for researching LGBT+ related topics) is a really great starting point to find out more about LGBT+ resources (https://libguides.reading.ac.uk/LGBT)!

Are you are interested in helping to continue to diversify the Library collections? If so, why not submit a resource suggestion?

The Library Diversity Fund, was created to help ensure increasing access to knowledge and resources about intersections and protected characteristics. This means that we can continue to build the collections, specifically in areas that are currently underrepresented in the Library.

Visit the official IDAHOBIT website today https://may17.org/ to find out more about how you can develop awareness and celebrate diversity.

 

Emma Allison, Library User Services

Interested in Arts and Health? Take a look at our new guide

Paint brushes in a glass jarIf you are planning your Masters dissertation, or you are heading into your final year this Autumn and your thoughts are starting to turn to topics for your dissertation, you might be interested to take a look at our new guide covering Arts and Health. It draws together useful resources for undertaking research in this interdisciplinary area, which is the focus of the University’s Health and Arts Research Initiative.

The guide has been compiled by our Academic Liaison Librarian for Pharmacy in conjunction with Dr Ranjita Dhital, Lecturer in Pharmacy Practice and Co-Chair of the Arts, Health and Wellbeing Special Interest Group of the Royal Society for Public Health. It includes details of recently purchased books bought specifically to support research in this area, as well as relevant databases, and key websites.

So if you are studying Art, Architecture, Film, Theatre & Television, Food & Nutrition, Pharmacy, or Psychology, take a look at our new guide to whet your appetite for possible dissertation topics.

Jackie Skinner
Academic Liaison Librarian for Pharmacy