New Think-Piece: Law in the Time of Cholera

We are pleased to publish our latest Think-Piece blogpost by Prof. Rosa Freedman (University of Reading) and Dr Nicolas Lemay-Hebert (University of Birmingham):

Law In The Time Of Cholera: Seeking Justice from the United Nations for Haiti’s Cholera Victims

Registration OPEN for our Second Annual Workshop

Participation for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: a one day workshop

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a global plan of action “for people, planet and prosperity”, encompassing both social and environmental concerns. Participation of all members of society is central to meeting and monitoring the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

There is a wealth of existing knowledge around innovative ways of engaging with community members and stakeholders at a range of scales, in a variety of socio-economic contexts, and with a diversity of methods from more passive big data approaches, to mass participation citizen science to participatory action research.

This one day event will explore how methods across this spectrum of approaches can be used to meet and monitor, and engage people with, the SDGs, as well as find synergies between them.

Register here

Download the workshop programme here

Programme
0930-1000 Registration (tea/coffee provided)
1000-1015 Welcome and introduction
1015-1100 Sustainable Development Goals: what do we know about them?
1100-1200 How are people connected to the SDGs through research
1200-1215 The SDGs and Academic Groups
1215-1315 Lunch
1315-1415 Methodological approaches to collecting data and engaging people
1415-1430 Tea/coffee
1430-1530 Taking things forward (1): challenges and opportunities for ethics and funding
1545-1630 Taking things forward (2): whole group discussion, and closing remarks

Students build giant lego house to highlight key community issues

Students at the John Madejski Academy (JMA), Reading built a life-size house out of giant Lego blocks with the help of architects, as they constructed a vision of their ideal ‘home’.

The JMA hosted the first Whitley for Real project on Wednesday 10th May 2017, facilitated by the Whitley Researchers and Sally Lloyd-Evans. Students from Years 8 and 12 worked together as a team – named by them as ‘The Royalty’ – using 1,500 ‘bricks’ measuring up to 75 cm long to construct their home.

Whitley for Real is a partnership between Reading Borough Council, JMA, Reading Girls School, the Whitley Researchers and the Whitley Community Development Association (WCDA), Whitley Big Local, the University of Reading’s Participation Lab, Reading UKCIC  and a range  of stakeholders including Bewley Homes, Whitley Excellent Cluster (WEC)  primary schools and the community.  The home-building project, funded by Reading UKCIC and with support from Bewley Homes, the Whitley Researchers and involving academics from the University’s Participation Lab, focused on young people’s attitudes to what makes a ‘welcome home’ in Whitley.

Read the full press release here.

Youth Wellbeing Network

We are pleased to launch the Youth Wellbeing Network, a global network of policymakers, practitioners, researchers and youth supporting a holistic approach to young people’s psychosocial wellbeing, care and support.

For updates, visit our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/YWellbeingNet/ and join our group to share information about events, resources and to network: https://www.facebook.com/groups/YWellbeingNet/.

Developing a Science Shop in Reading

We are pleased to let you know about our latest Participation Lab project. Alice Mauchline, Lab Advisory Group member, in the School of Agriculture, Policy and Development is exploring how to best go about establishing a Science Shop in Reading and is planning a workshop to learn from existing Science Shops in June 2017. Read more about the project here.

Participation Lab’s 2nd Annual Workshop – call for contributions

Call for Contributions closes 31st March 2017

From Big Data to Participatory Action Research: Participation for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development 

Friday, 30th June 2017, University of Reading

Participation Lab’s 2nd Annual Workshop

Supported by the University of Reading’s Participation Lab and Global Development Research Division, the Participatory Geographies Research Group of RGS-IBG, and Stockholm Environment Institute (York)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a global plan of action “for people, planet and prosperity”, encompassing both social and environmental concerns. Participation of all members of society is central to meeting and monitoring the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Participation in and for the SDGs is the focus of the Participation Lab’s 2nd Annual Workshop in 2017 (https://blogs.reading.ac.uk/participation-lab/).

There is a wealth of existing knowledge around innovative ways of engaging with community members and stakeholders at a range of scales, in a variety of socio-economic contexts, and with a diversity of methods from more passive big data approaches, to mass participation citizen science to participatory action research. This one day event will explore how methods across this spectrum of approaches can be used to meet and monitor the SDGs.

We want to bring together researchers and practitioners to explore how traditional and digital methods such as community engagement, participatory mapping, GIS, digital art, photography and video, online games, interactive web platforms, social media among others, might be combined with crowdsourcing and citizen science approaches to advance progress on the Goals and what innovations might be required.

The programme for our one-day event will be designed by you. We are seeking contributions from academics, practitioners, policymakers and community members in the form of 15 minute presentations, addressing the question of participation and sustainable development. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • SDGs and development
  • SDGs in global North and South
  • Contributory, collaborative or co-created citizen science
  • Citizen science approaches for development
  • Participatory research methodologies, incl. mapping, GIS, art, photography,
  • Participatory Action Research
  • Big data

Please submit the following by 31st March 2017to Hilary Geoghegan h.geoghegan@reading.ac.uk:

Already confirmed: a workshop around the ethics of engaging people in citizen science and participatory methods in global South contexts.

  • Your name, affiliation, career stage, email address
  • Max. 250 word synopsis of your presentation
  • Max. 100 word biographical statement

The organising committee (Hilary Geoghegan (Reading), Rachel Pateman (SEI, York), and Sarah West (SEI, York)) intend to confirm the programme by Monday 10th April 2017.

The Workshop forms the opening day of the Participatory Geographies Research Group (RGS-IBG) Away Weekend in Reading: Participatory Geographies Research Group Away Weekend – June 30th – July 2nd.

Anxious about austerity: fragile family lives

As part of the Participation Lab’s Think-Pieces, we are pleased to publish our latest blogpost by Emma Cox, Geography undergraduate student, University of Reading: Anxious About Austerity: Fragile Family Lives. She writes that households and families are bearing the brunt of austerity and community systems are suffering.  The blogpost was written as part of the second year undergraduate module, Culture, Identity & Place, taught by Ruth Evans and Sally Lloyd-Evans, University of Reading.

Implementing Change for Hidden Young Carers

The Participation Lab was pleased to host the Implementing Change for Hidden Young Carers conference at the University of Reading on 22 February 2017. The conference was chaired by young adult carers and organised by the Children’s Society Include Project.

The Hidden Photography Exhibition displayed powerful photographs of hidden young carers and their perspectives.

                 

The conference, attended by 80 practitioners, directors of services and commissioners, provided updates on the current national picture for young carers and shared models of effective identification and whole family support for young carers and their families. Delegates heard from Mark Brown, Department of Health, about the new National Carers’ Strategy due to be launched soon in 2017 and from Helen Leadbitter about recent changes brought about by the Carers’ Act and Children and Families’ Act.

The afternoon focused on families affected by stigmatised illness and those often hidden from support, including young carers affected by parental substance misuse and mental illness. Ruth Evans and Helen Leadbitter presented the particular challenges faced by young carers in refugee and asylum-seeking families.

Young adult carers led important discussions about how caring affects young carers’ wellbeing, in positive as well as negative ways, and the importance of young carers’ participation so that they feel valued, heard and represented.

The emotional bucket and how the stresses young carers face can be alleviated by finding ways to open the tap and relax.

See the Agenda for more information.