Monthly Archives: December 2011

Hungary’s New Electoral Law, Part 2: Analysis

Alan Renwick In Part 1 of this post, I outlined the basics of Hungary’s new electoral law.  Now I turn to the question of what we should make of the changes introduced. Before I get going, I should say that … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 28 Comments

Hungary’s New Electoral Law, Part 1: The Basics

Alan Renwick While most of us have been preparing to hang up our stockings, Hungary’s parliamentarians have been hard at work: on Friday alone they passed fourteen new laws.  One of these was a new electoral law – the first … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 11 Comments

The government’s proposals for recall of MPs: moving in the right direction, but further still to go

Alan Renwick Last week, as promised in the coalition programme, the government published its proposals for allowing voters to recall MPs who are found guilty of serious wrongdoing.  The draft bill and accompanying white paper set out procedures whereby a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The rise and rise of human rights in British political discourse

Richard Wood, who graduated with first-class honours in Politics and International Relations from Reading last summer, is now working as a research assistant on Alan Renwick’s project looking at changing patterns of debate over political reform.  In this post, he … Continue reading

Posted in British Politics | 1 Comment

Intervention and Prudence

Patrick Porter Finally after a busy teaching term I’ve got a chance to add some thoughts to the great post and articles by Jon Western and Joshua Goldstein on humanitarian intervention. Bottom line: I think Jon and Joshua make a robust case … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment