Alzheimer’s disease

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Picture this! What’s going on in the brain?

Doctors and researchers use brain imaging methods to diagnose illness and investigate the brain. These talks will introduce brain imaging for science research. Professor Clare Mackay from the University of Oxford will explain how we can see early brain changes in Alzheimer’s disease. Dr Etienne Roesch will talk about brain imaging in science research from virtual reality to the real world. Suitable for all audiences – no science knowledge needed.
To see the full details of the event or to book tickets, click here.

This event takes place at the Three Guineas in a self-contained cellar bar, with a separate entrance from the main bar.

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Mice, men, mad cows, cannibalism and…dementia?

Dementia is a name for a group of diseases which cause reduced brain function. Dr Francesco Tamagnini and Dr Patrick Lewis will introduce two types of dementia: Prion disease and Alzheimer’s disease. This is an excellent event for anyone who wants to learn something new about dementia and hear about the research on it that scientists are doing at the University of Reading. Suitable for all audiences – no science knowledge needed.
To see the full details of the event or to book tickets, click here.

This event takes place at the Three Guineas in a self-contained cellar bar, with a separate entrance from the main bar.

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Brain Glue: Sticking it to Dementia

Wednesday 28 February, 7.30-8.45pm

G11, Henley Business School, Whiteknights campus

This event is free to attend.

Registration in advance is not required, but is recommended as public lectures are often full. Click here to book your place >

Nearly a million people in the UK today are living with dementia. Currently there is no treatment that will prevent, cure or slow down its progression. To overcome this scientists are now studying not only nerve cells in the brain, but the so-called glial cells – previously thought to be just the ‘glue’ that sticks other brain cells together. Evidence suggests that these cells could provide insight and even early warning about the onset of disease, years before clinical symptoms develop.

The human brain is the most complex computer we have, yet we are still discovering the basics of how it works. This lecture will outline some of the challenges in finding treatments for brain diseases, and explore the potential of glial cells in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr Mark Dallas is a Lecturer in Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience at the School of Pharmacy, University of Reading. He is the Academic Co-Ordinator for the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford Network, Neuroscience Theme Lead for the Physiological Society and sits on the editorial board of Physiology News.

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By Dr Mark Dallas, Lecturer in Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience, University of ReadingMark Dallas

Our hope as dementia scientists is that these cells could unlock a new avenue of treatments that alters the course of Alzheimer’s disease

The human brain is a complex structure made up of different types of cells. You have probably heard scientists talk about nerve cells or brain cells. These are the cells that are lost in Alzheimer’s disease.

However, there are a similar number of other cell types within the brain, called glial cells. ‘Glial’ comes from the Greek word for glue, as these cells were originally believed to hold the nerve cells together. It is now clear that these cells are highly specialised and vital for brain function.

So what are these cells, and how could they help us find treatments for Alzheimer’s?

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