A wet winter – and what might come next?

Much has been written/spoken in recent weeks about the amount of rain that has fallen this winter (December-February) in southern England (and other regions) of the United Kingdom. But several other interesting facts appear to have been overlooked in the almost daily (at times) deluge of information above high winds, heavy rainfall, high tides and … Continue reading “A wet winter – and what might come next?”

December 2013-January 2014 in Reading: Wet and, at times, stormy

A brief overview After a dry start to December 2013 (just 11.3 mm of rain fell in the 33 days ending 0900 UTC on 15 December at the Department’s weather station) there was an abrupt change in the weather that was to last for over three weeks. Many others have, over recent days, written and … Continue reading “December 2013-January 2014 in Reading: Wet and, at times, stormy”

The summer of 2013 in Reading

The first five months of the year in Reading had been cool – with an average temperature 1.8 degC below normal. After the coldest May in Reading for 17 years, June continued in the same vein – being 0.9 degC colder than average and the coldest June (along with June 2012) since 1991. However, in … Continue reading “The summer of 2013 in Reading”

2012-2013 – a long winter and a cold Easter

The winter of 2012-13 definitely extended into late March (and, as I write this, into early April). Figure 1 (courtesy of Mike Stroud, our meteorological observer) sums up why it failed to feel like spring towards the end of the month. Shown in red are the daily values of the maximum and minimum air temperatures … Continue reading “2012-2013 – a long winter and a cold Easter”

Climate Science and the Media – Ed becomes a Daily Mail star

Some of you may have been aware of some interesting goings on amongst some of those in the Department and the Daily Mail over the last week all started by this article by David Rose, which used (without attribution until he made a complaint) a figure from Ed Hawkins’ blog. Since there has been lots … Continue reading “Climate Science and the Media – Ed becomes a Daily Mail star”

Recovering space weather events from historical data

The impact of the Sun and solar wind on Earth’s technological systems has become known as Space Weather. In order to understand the impact of space weather and better forecast its occurrence it is important to gather as much information as possible. Historical data sets could help us understand space weather conditions from a time … Continue reading “Recovering space weather events from historical data”

Future sea-ice conditions and shipping routes in the Arctic

by Steffen Tietsche Sea ice in the Arctic has declined dramatically in recent decades, and we will most likely see summers with an ice-free Arctic ocean before the century is over. This has far-reaching consequences for the Arctic environment, for global climate, and for the way humans interact with the Arctic. One of these consequences … Continue reading “Future sea-ice conditions and shipping routes in the Arctic”

Have aerosols caused the observed North Atlantic multidecadal variability?

By Jon Robson Multidecadal changes in the North Atlantic sea surface temperature (NASST) have been linked to a range of important climate impacts in Europe, Africa (most notably Sahel rainfall) and North and South America. Indeed, in the mid 1990s an increase in hurricane numbers, and a shift in European climate (notably to wet and … Continue reading “Have aerosols caused the observed North Atlantic multidecadal variability?”

8-9 February 2013 Winter Storm in the US Northeast

It was only about six months ago when the US Northeast was the focus of our attention in Weather and Climate Discussion. Hurricane Sandy, also known as the “Frankenstorm”, brought a massive storm surge and devastating coastal flooding to the states of New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. Two weeks ago, the US Northeast was … Continue reading “8-9 February 2013 Winter Storm in the US Northeast”

Stakeholder event on floods and droughts

I recently organised a stakeholder engagement event on “floods and droughts – what can the latest science tell us?” which involved over 20 researchers from across the Met Department (see list here). By stakeholders – I mean people outside academia, for example from Government Departments,business, charities.  The event gave stakeholder s an opportunity to engage … Continue reading “Stakeholder event on floods and droughts”