Category Archives: Boundary layer

A Different Kind Of Turbulence

By Miguel Teixeira It might be thought that turbulence is essentially the same everywhere. However, its mixing efficiency depends not only on its intensity (as might be expected intuitively), but also on more subtle properties, such as its anisotropy (which … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Environmental physics, Fluid-dynamics, Oceans, Turbulence, Waves | Leave a comment

Where Do All My Balloons Go?

By: Andrew K. Mirza Turbulence! If you have ever travelled by aeroplane, then you may have experienced atmospheric turbulence during the flight: It is when the captain switches on the seat-belt sign; requests all passengers return to their seats and … Continue reading

Posted in Atmospheric dispersion, Boundary layer, Greenhouse gases, Numerical modelling, Turbulence, Wind | Leave a comment

Air Quality in Reading during COVID-19

By Helen Dacre I’ve been working from home for exactly a month now and like everyone else have been adapting to a new routine.  This involves taking a daily shuffle around Caversham to get some exercise. There’s been a noticeable … Continue reading

Posted in Air quality, Boundary layer, Climate | Leave a comment

Trading Evil lasers for MAGIC Doppler lidars

By: Janet Barlow  Lasers may have an evil reputation in Hollywood, but they are very good for observing urban meteorology. We recently took part in the MAGIC project field campaign in London, deploying a Doppler lidar to measure wind-speed around … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

Challenges in the closure of the surface energy budget at the continental scale

By: Bo Dong Since satellite observations began in the late 1970s, our knowledge of energy flows in and out of the Earth’s climate system has been greatly advanced. Taking advantage of state-of-the-art Earth Observation (EO) programmes such as the Clouds … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, earth observation, Energy budget | Leave a comment

The sky is the limit – How tall buildings affect wind and air quality

By: Denise Hertwig Based on current UN estimates, by 2050 over 6.6 billion people (68% of the total population) will be living in cities. Across the world, tall (> 50 m height) and super-tall (> 300 m) buildings already define … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

The Boundary Layer and Submesoscale Motions

By: Alan Grant Science is an exciting career, although what you may consider to be exciting will depend on your field. Sometimes things get most exciting when what initially appears to be a frustrating problem turns into an interesting problem. … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Numerical modelling, Oceans | Leave a comment

SuPy: An urban land surface model for Pythonista

By: Ting Sun Python is now extensively employed by the atmospheric sciences community for data analyses and numerical modelling thanks to its simplicity and the large scientific Python ecosystem (e.g., PyData community). Although I cherish Mathematica as my native programming … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Climate modelling, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

Remodelling Building Design Sustainability from a Human Centred Approach (Refresh) project overview

By: Hannah Gough In 2014, 54 % of the world’s population resided in an urban area and this is projected to rise to 66 % by 2050 (United Nations, 2014). It is also estimated that 90 % of people’s time in … Continue reading

Posted in Boundary layer, Climate, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

The Role of Synoptic Meteorology on UK Air Pollution

By Chris Webber In the past year the issue of air pollution within the UK has been elevated, driven by the loss of life that it causes (in 2013 > 500,000 years of UK lives lost due to air pollution … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Atmospheric chemistry, Boundary layer, Environmental hazards, Urban meteorology | Tagged | Leave a comment