Category Archives: Climate modelling

Regional vs Global Models From The Perspective of a Polar Climate Scientist

By: Charlotte Lang There is a debate in the world of polar climate and ice sheet surface modelling about global (GCM) versus regional (RCM) models and each side is trying to convince the other that they do better: global modellers … Continue reading

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Modelling Dust Extremes Over East Asia

 By: Dhirendra Kumar Mineral dust plays an important role in the earth system due to its interaction with climate, ecosystems, biogeochemical cycles, and human society in direct and indirect ways [1,2,3]. Their interactions with the weather and climate occur at … Continue reading

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Does working from home help to reduce climate change?

By: Helen Dacre During a recent conversation about working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic a friend asked me ‘Given that I no longer commute to work in my car every day, will that help to reduce climate change?’  The … Continue reading

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Large and irreversible future decline of the Greenland ice-sheet

By: Jonathan Gregory Sea-level rise is one of the most serious consequences of global warming. By the end of this century, if emissions of greenhouse gases continue to increase (mostly carbon dioxide, from burning oil, natural gas and coal), global … Continue reading

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How can we contribute to extreme event attribution in the Arctic?

By: Daniela Flocco News of broken temperature records, droughts and extreme climate events are nowadays constantly present in newspapers and on social media. The study of the connection between extreme and global climate changes has become subject of an area … Continue reading

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What is “net zero” for methane?

By: Bill Collins Recent research is suggesting that the way methane is accounted for in climate targets overemphasises its contribution to climate change at the end of the century. This might mean that countries or sectors (e.g. agriculture) with large … Continue reading

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Desert Dust in the Atmosphere: Giant Particles, Giant Consequences?

By: Claire Ryder As I write, storm Gloria decays over the Mediterranean Sea, while large amounts of desert dust whipped up by strong winds over the Sahara desert have been whirled in to action by Gloria and remain in the … Continue reading

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A Tipsy Earth?

By: Jonah Bloch-Johnson Hi. I’m Jonah, a scientist here at the UoR, and I study whether global warming will be more like drinking water, soda, or beer. What do I mean by that? Let me explain. Both thirst and the Earth’s … Continue reading

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The latest on aerosol radiative forcing

By: Nicolas Bellouin Aerosols are tiny liquid or solid particles suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere. Some aerosols form naturally, like the sea spray emitted by breaking waves, the mineral dust that form sandstorms, or smoke from wildfires. But human activities, … Continue reading

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Don’t (always) blame the weather forecaster

By: Ross Bannister There are (I am sure) numerous metaphors that suggest that a small, almost immeasurable event, can have a catastrophic outcome – that adding the proverbial straw to the load of the camel will break its back. In 1972, … Continue reading

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