Category Archives: Climate

Coffee and atmospheric physics

by: Prof Maarten Ambaum Every morning I trundle down to the office kitchen and I make myself a whole thermos flask of coffee which keeps me going for the rest of the day. In fact, most people in our Department … Continue reading

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Climate change is spinning up the global energy and water cycles.

By: Richard Allan I was unfortunate enough to mildly injure my middle finger by typing too frenetically on a train journey from Toulouse returning from an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change meeting. I soon forgot about this by luckily stepping … Continue reading

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Effect of the North Atlantic Ocean on the Northeast Asian climate: variability and predictability

By: Paul-Arthur Monerie North East Asia has warmed substantially after the mid-1990s leading to an increase in temperature extremes and to societal impacts (Dong et al., 2016). Predicting the variability of the North East Asian climate is therefore of primordial interest … Continue reading

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It’s Hotter Than A Ginger Mill In Hades

By: Giles Harrison and Stephen Burt Or so they sometimes say in the south of the United States. But without a reference ginger mill or ready access to Hades, how do we know how hot it really is, and how … Continue reading

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Why was there decadal increase in summer heat waves over China across the mid-1990s?

By: Buwen Dong Heat waves (HWs), commonly defined as prolonged periods of excessive hot weather, are a distinctive type of high-temperature extreme (Perkins 2015). These high-temperature extremes can lead to severe damage to human society and ecosystems. In our studies, … Continue reading

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Challenges in the closure of the surface energy budget at the continental scale

By: Bo Dong Since satellite observations began in the late 1970s, our knowledge of energy flows in and out of the Earth’s climate system has been greatly advanced. Taking advantage of state-of-the-art Earth Observation (EO) programmes such as the Clouds … Continue reading

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30 °C days in Reading

By: Roger Brugge The temperature in the Reading University Atmospheric Observatory peaked at 32.3°C on Saturday 29 June 2019. Press stories were full of pictures of people sunning themselves across parts of the United Kingdom in glorious sunshine – yet … Continue reading

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Science outreach in coastal Arctic communities

By: Lucia Hosekova Figure 1: NASA image by Robert Simmon based on Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) surface temperature analysis data including ship and buoy data from the Hadley Centre. Caption by Adam Voiland. Few people are more aware … Continue reading

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How climate modelling can help us better understand the historical temperature evolution

By: Andrea Dittus Figure 1: Annual global mean surface temperatures from NASA GISTemp, NOAA GlobalTemp, Hadley/UEA HadCRUT4, Berkeley Earth, Cowtan and Way, Copernicus/ECMWF and Carbon Brief’s raw temperature record. Anomalies plotted with respect to a 1981-2010 baseline. Figure and caption from Carbon Brief (https://www.carbonbrief.org/state-of-the-climate-how-world-warmed-2018). Earth’s climate has warmed … Continue reading

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The OpenIFS User Workshop

By Bob Plant I’ve been asked to write a blog post to go live on 17 June, the opening day of the 2019 OpenIFS user workshop. As I’m involved in the organisation, it would almost seem strange not to talk … Continue reading

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