Category Archives: Climate

Using Old Ships To Do New Science

By: Praveen Teleti Weather Rescue at Sea: its goals and progress update. Observing the environment around us is fundamental to learning about and understanding the natural world. Before the Renaissance, everyday weather was thought to be works of divine or … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Data collection, Data rescue, Historical climatology, Reanalyses | Leave a comment

Including Human Behaviour in Models to Understand the Impact of Climate Change on People

By Megan McGrory In 2020 56% of the global population lived in cities and towns, and they accounted for two-thirds of global energy consumption and over 70% of CO2 emissions. The share of the global population living in urban areas … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling, Urban meteorology | Leave a comment

Making Flights Smoother, Safer, and Greener

By: Paul Williams Atmospheric turbulence is the leading cause of weather-related injuries to air passengers and flight attendants. Bumpy air is estimated to cost the global aviation sector up to $1bn annually, and evidence suggests that climate change is causing … Continue reading

Posted in aviation, Climate, Environmental hazards, Turbulence | Leave a comment

From Ürümqi to Minneapolis: Clustering City Climates with Self-Organising Maps

By: Niall McCarroll As a Research Software Engineer, my job involves developing, testing and maintaining software that scientists can use to analyse earth observation and climate data.  Recently I’ve been developing some software that can be used to visualise climate … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Data Visualisation, Machine Learning | Leave a comment

How On Earth Do We Measure Photosynthesis?

By: Natalie Douglas Photosynthesis is a biological process that removes carbon (in the form of carbon dioxide) from the atmosphere and is therefore a key process in determining the amount of climate change. So, how do we measure it so … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Climate modelling, earth observation | Leave a comment

Using ChatGPT in Atmospheric Science

By: Mark Muetzelfeldt ChatGPT is amazing. Seriously. Go try it: chat.openai.com/chat. So what is it? It is an artificial intelligence language model that has been trained on vast amounts of data, turning this into an internal representation of the structure of … Continue reading

Posted in Academia, Artificial Intelligence, Climate, Students, Teaching & Learning | Leave a comment

Tiny Particles, Big Impact?

By Laura Wilcox Aerosols are tiny particles or liquid droplets suspended in the atmosphere. They can be created by human activities, such as burning fossil fuels or clearing land, or have natural sources, such as volcanoes. Depending on their composition, … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Air quality, Climate, Climate change | Leave a comment

Uncrewed Aircraft for Cloud and Atmospheric Electricity Research

By: Keri Nicoll The popularity and availability of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), has led to a surge in their use in many areas, including aerial photography, surveying, search and rescue, and traffic monitoring.  This is also the case for atmospheric … Continue reading

Posted in Aerosols, Boundary layer, Climate, Clouds, Fieldwork | Leave a comment

Investigating the Dark Caverns of Antarctica

By: Ryan Patmore I am an Oceanographer and I occasionally spend my time trying to find the best ways of understanding the point where ice meets the ocean. This naturally draws me to Antarctica – covered in penguins, yes, but … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, Oceanography, Polar | Tagged | Leave a comment

Oceanic Influences On Arctic And Antarctic Sea Ice

By: Jake Aylmer The futures of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice are difficult to pin down in part due to climate model uncertainty. Recent work reveals different ocean behaviours that have a critical impact on sea ice, highlighting a potential … Continue reading

Posted in Antarctic, Arctic, Climate, Climate change, Climate modelling, Cryosphere, Oceans, Polar | Leave a comment