Author Archives: Stephen Burt

Evaluating convective-permitting models over South Africa

By Will Keat Several operational forecasting centres around the world now run convective-permitting models (CPMs) to forecast rainfall. These kilometre-scale models are sufficiently high  resolution to allow convection to be resolved explicitly (i.e. without the need for parameterisation), and have … Continue reading

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Climate change in the Mediterranean Sea

By Fanny Adloff The Mediterranean is the largest semi-enclosed sea on our planet. Acting as a miniature ocean, this basin is appropriate to study climate change impact on the ocean. The residence time of the Mediterranean waters – of about … Continue reading

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The “size” of the NWP/DA problem

By Javier Amezcua There is a professor in the University of Reading that likes to say that the Data Assimilation (DA) problem in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) is larger than the size of the universe (estimated to be around 1080 … Continue reading

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Hidden in the clouds

By Nicolas Bellouin Our atmosphere contains varying amounts of tiny liquid or solid particles called aerosols. Some aerosols have a natural origin, like the mineral dust particles that form sandstorms, or the sea spray emitted by breaking waves. Other aerosols … Continue reading

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U.K. Spring Weather and the Natural World

By Pete Inness We are now just over half way through April, so about half way through meteorological Spring which is defined as March, April and May. Despite the warm weather of the last few days it’s been a fairly … Continue reading

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Skirting the Issue

By Geoff Wadge During a major explosive volcanic eruption a set of three main processes transfers mass and heat from the solid earth to the atmosphere. These three processes are: a gas thrust (jet) extending up from the volcanic vent, … Continue reading

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Playful floods

By Sanita Vetra-Carvalho Flooding is no fun for those who have been affected by it. However, being able to ‘experience’ flooding in some sense is one of the best ways to communicate flood risks as well as the potential solutions to … Continue reading

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Estimating the risks of climate change: what are the effects of climate policy?

By Nigel Arnell I am writing this from Beijing, where the 13th National People’s Congress has just reaffirmed the Chinese commitment to control future emissions of greenhouse gases and meet the aspirations of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. This … Continue reading

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Improving estimates of soil moisture over Ghana

By Ewan Pinnington This work aims to improve estimates of soil moisture over Ghana as part of the ERADACS project. In regions where the population relies on subsistence farming it is soil moisture, rather than precipitation per se, that is … Continue reading

Posted in Africa, Climate, Climate modelling, data assimilation, Hydrology, land use, Numerical modelling | Tagged | Leave a comment

A simple way to find out where the moisture for regional rainfall comes from

by Liang Guo Moisture tracing is an interesting scientific topic that has fascinated meteorologists and hydrologists for decades. Methods for tracing moisture are numerous, from observations to numerical modelling, from water isotopes to remote sensing, from online tracking to off-line … Continue reading

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