Monthly Archives: September 2019

Probing the atmosphere with sound waves

By: Javier Amezcua Summer is a quiet time for both the University of Reading and the town itself. The buzzing that fills campus during term time is gone, the population decreases and activities are reduced. Some people find it relaxing … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, data assimilation, Stratosphere, Wind | Tagged | Leave a comment

Coffee and atmospheric physics

by: Prof Maarten Ambaum Every morning I trundle down to the office kitchen and I make myself a whole thermos flask of coffee which keeps me going for the rest of the day. In fact, most people in our Department … Continue reading

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Do we have an appropriate description of energetic particles in the Earth’s outer radiation belt?

By: Oliver Allanson Figure 1: A particle undergoes Brownian motion. The short answer: probably not, at least not all of the time. In our state-of-the-art and physics-based numerical experiments, we analyse the motion of 100 million individual high-energy electrons that evolve … Continue reading

Posted in Space, space weather | Leave a comment

Climate change is spinning up the global energy and water cycles.

By: Richard Allan I was unfortunate enough to mildly injure my middle finger by typing too frenetically on a train journey from Toulouse returning from an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change meeting. I soon forgot about this by luckily stepping … Continue reading

Posted in Climate, earth observation, Water cycle | Leave a comment